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Poster [clear filter]
Friday, June 1
 

3:30pm

01. (Research and Technical Studies) An American Icon in Plastic: The Technical Analysis, Study, & Treatment of a Early Edition 1959 Barbie
An early edition (c. 1959) polyvinyl chloride Barbie™ doll afflicted with bleeding autograph ink and white leg efflorescence was studied with chemical analysis and computed tomography to understand her construction and symptoms. Comparison with a second Barbie™ of slightly later manufacture (c. 1960) shows how the early design of Mattel’s flagship toy was refined including a shift from all-PVC construction to body parts of different plastics and associated changes in mold design. Contrary to a more frequently encountered “sticky leg syndrome,” wherein plasticizer migrates from the PVC to the surface as a tacky liquid, this doll exhibited a waxy white stearate bloom from the mid-thighs to the ankles. In addition, the doll was autographed by Ruth Handler, the original designer of BarbieTM and a cofounder of the Mattel Corporation. Her signature and the date are now barely legible, as the once sharp lines of ink have migrated within the PVC plastic. The dolls were imaged with computed tomography, multi-spectral imaging, and X-radiography, and the composition of their component parts was discerned with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Collectively, this information helped the team decide whether the compound exuding from the 1959 doll’s legs has an ongoing function in the plastic, whether its utility was limited to the manufacturing phase, and whether it will recur. Once the stearate was identified, the decision to treat or remove the waxy bloom from the Barbie™ could be rationalized and achieved.

Speakers
avatar for Odile Madden

Odile Madden

Senior Scientist, The Getty Conservation Institute
Odile Madden is Senior Scientist and leader of the Modern and Contemporary Art Research Initiative at The Getty Conservation Institute. Prior to joining the GCI, she was Research Scientist at the Smithsonian’s Museum Conservation Institute where she developed a modern materials... Read More →

Co-Authors
ML

Morgan L Burgess

Fellow, National Museum of American History
Morgan Burgess graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2012 with a B.A. in Classical Archaeology and a minor in Studio Art. Her first conservation experiences were as an undergrad at the Mugello Valley Arcaheological Project: Poggio Colla Field School in Vicchio, Italy. After... Read More →
avatar for Marci Jefcoat Burton

Marci Jefcoat Burton

Engen Conservation Fellow, National Air and Space Museum
Marci Jefcoat Burton is currently an Engen Conservation Fellow at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Smithsonian Institution. In 2018, she graduated with an MA in Conservation from the UCLA/Getty Conservation of Archeological and Ethnographic Materials program, after completing... Read More →
DH

David Hunt

Physical / Forensic Anthropologist, D-ABFA, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
David Hunt is a physical and forensic anthropologist and archaeologist specializing in mortuary analysis and the curation of skeletal remains. He is the physical anthropology collections manager at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History where he oversees... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein

Ellen Pearlstein

Conservator, UCLA/Getty Master’s Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles in both Information Studies, and is a founding faculty member in the UCLA/Getty Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation. Her research interests include American Indian tribal museums and how... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

02. (Objects) Electroplated silver during a re-lacquering campaign at Winterthur: treatment and analytical insights
The Conservation of Silver and Copper Alloy Objects project is part of a multiphase institutional initiative to treat objects in Winterthur Museum’s diverse collections prioritized by greatest conservation need. Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library received IMLS funding to support a two-year project to remove aged or failed lacquer coatings, polish, and coat approximately 500 of its most vulnerable silver objects, to continue analytical research related to silver surface corrosion, and to commence new research on corrosion and coating issues. Most of the time tarnish is easily removed from a silver surface with a mild abrasive; however, polishing the silver in this way permanently removes the most superficial layer of the precious metal. This is commonly considered acceptable if the silver in question were to be lacquered, which would protect the object for up to 30 years by making aggressive polishing campaigns unnecessary. However, unlike silver, silver-plated objects have an extremely thin display surface of silver and a more substantial substrate of a base metal. Objects that have been electroplated are particularly prone to mistreatment as the precious metal display surface is merely atoms thick and can be removed during a single polishing campaign. For delicate electroplated surfaces, technicians at Winterthur have been using a newly developed acidified thiourea gel cleaning system. However, uncertainty regarding the efficacy of thiourea on a copper substrate has encouraged the IMLS team to research other methods for cleaning electroplated silver. Initial treatment results will be presented here. The silver-plating method employed on an object will likely determine the treatment of the surface. As a result, the Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory at Winterthur Museum has been conducting parallel research into ways of differentiating plate methods. ED-XRF (energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence) spectroscopy was performed to determine object elemental composition. Alpha and beta x-ray emission lines are absorbed differently by surrounding elements after emission: the deeper the element or the thicker the layer on top, the more the ratios are affected. In order to semi-quantify the thickness of the plate, Cu-K ratios were used to measure the absorption of these emission lines by the silver plate. For example, during cleaning tests performed on an Argand lampshade, the thinness of the silver film and the fact that it was easily removed by abrasive cleaning all indicated the presence of an electroplated film. By analyzing the XRF data in the aforementioned way, the shade showed a silver plate thickness of much less than 1 µm, which was clearly different in plating technique from the rim, the shade support and the Argand lamp body, which was already confirmed as Sheffield Plate. Electroplate is generally found to be much less than 5 µm, although can be built up to more. It was therefore found that XRF can be used to quickly and non-destructively gauge possible plating techniques. As more plated objects are analyzed as part of this project, a database will be accumulated in order to inform thickness variations across plating methods.

Speakers
TP

Tia Polidori

Conservation Technician, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Tia is a conservation technician working on a two-year IMLS grant at Winterthur recoating silver objects in the Winterthur collection.
avatar for Katelyn Rovito

Katelyn Rovito

Conservation Assistant, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Katie is a conservation technician working on a two-year IMLS grant at Winterthur recoating silver objects in the Winterthur collection.

Co-Authors
avatar for Rosie Grayburn

Rosie Grayburn

Associate Scientist, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Rosie is an Associate Scientist within the Conservation Department at Winterthur Museum, and Affiliated Assistant Professor at the University of Delaware's Department of Art Conservation.

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

03. (Objects) THEOPHILUS ON THE HARDENING OF STEEL FILES
Casehardening is a technique developed to harden the exterior of low carbon content steels for objects such as hand tools or gun parts. Historic descriptions for the process of casehardening are rare. In his 12th century treatise On Divers Arts, Theophilius Presbyter presents one of the earliest, most complete explanations on the process of hardening small files. Traditionally it is thought that carbon is mainly responsible for the hardening of the metal surface, however, a question has arisen on the role of nitrogen in the process. In this experiment, Theophilus’s casehardening method was recreated and the samples produced were analyzed to determine if the method was one of carburization or nitrocarburization. Casehardened samples were analyzed by optical microscopy using a Zeiss Axio Imager. Microstructures of possible nitrides were found in each fired sample though it is not possible to definitively confirm them. While the presence of nitrogen cannot be absolutely confirmed in these casehardened samples, the goatskin used in the recipe was found to be one possible source of nitrogen. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy were utilized to verify and measure the presence of nitrogen.

Speakers
avatar for Katrina Zacharias

Katrina Zacharias

Third-year Graduate Fellow in Art Conservation, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State
Katrina Zacharias is a current Graduate Fellow in the Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State College. She is specializing in Objects conservation with an interest in Arms and Armor- firearms in particular. Katrina holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Missouri... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Aaron Shugar

Dr. Aaron Shugar

Professor/Educator, Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo
Ph.D., University College London | M.S., University of Sheffield | B.A., York University | | Aaron Shugar, PhD | Dr. Aaron Shugar is currently the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Conservation Science in the Art Conservation Department, SUNY - Buffalo State. Dr. Shugar earned his... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Thornton

Jonathan Thornton

Conservation Professor, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo State)
Jonathan Thornton has taught objects conservation at the Art Conservation Department since 1980. Following an earlier career as an artist/silversmith, he studied conservation in this department when it was still located in Cooperstown, NY, and received his M. A. and Certificate of... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

04. (Wooden Artifacts) Investigating the Renaissance Marriage Chest: A Study of the Methods and Materials Used in the Construction of Two Florentine Cassoni from the Workshop of Paolo Uccello
The Yale University Art Gallery has in its collection two rare examples of fifteenth-century cassoni from the workshop of Paolo Uccello (Florence, 1397-1475): a cassone front panel, depicting The Triumphal Entry of Titus and Vespasian into Rome (ca. 1430), and a complete cassone with painted panels depicting The Battle of the Amazons Before the Walls of Troy; and female allegories of Faith and Justice; with its original lid, which features a reclining female nude on the interior (ca. 1460). Initial investigations of the cassone and the cassone front panel indicated the need for in-depth technical research that would inform and support their restoration treatments. In 2016, technical examinations of both works were performed in preparation for the forthcoming conservation treatment of the painted panels. Through visual examination, infrared and ultraviolet photography, reflectance transformation imaging (RTI), micro x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, x-radiography and stereo radiography techniques, the materials and methods used to construct the cassone and the preparatory and paint layers techniques could be identified. These investigative techniques, which most importantly confirmed the presence of original 15th-century nails in all corners, show that the cassone has maintained its structural entity and essential dimensions despite several 19th-century additions. In addition to structural changes, these techniques have also informed several alterations made to the painted surfaces and have shed light on the overall conservation history of the cassone. Technical research of the cassone has helped to better understand cassone panel fragment, in terms of its preparatory and paint layers, conservation history, and dismemberment. Comparisons of these two works, each created at early and late periods in Uccello’s career, not only speak to the changes and consistencies in Paolo Uccello’s workshop(s), but also help to elucidate our understanding of other 15th-century cassone panels. The preliminary results of our technical investigation will be discussed in this poster with a focus on the artist materials and techniques encountered in these two fifteenth-century cassoni.

Speakers
avatar for Sydney Beall

Sydney Beall

Postgraduate Fellow in Paintings Conservation, Yale University Art Gallery
Sydney Beall is a Postgraduate Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the Yale University Art Gallery where she is focusing on the conservation treatments of two Italian 15th-century cassone painted by Paolo Uccello (1397–1475). She earned her M.S. from the Winterthur/University of... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Irma Passeri

Irma Passeri

Senior Conservator of Paintings, Yale University Art Gallery
Irma Passeri is Senior Paintings Conservator at the Yale University Art Gallery. She received her degree in the Conservation of Easel Paintings from the Conservation School of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, in Florence in 1998. Prior to working for the Yale Art Gallery, she worked... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

05. (Objects) Preserving the Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Leatherface
The mask used in the 1974 horror classic, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, is housed in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas Austin. The mask was made from a latex rubber and meant to resemble human flesh – a grisly prize of the film’s cannibalistic villain. Over time, the mask has become fragile and brittle, losing its original flexibility. It was determined that a supportive mount should be made in an effort to improve long term storage and display options. However, the mask could not withstand the pressure of most traditional casting materials which could be used to obtain the interior topography of the mask. By exploring the uses of photogrammetry, laser scanning, 3D digital modeling and 3D printing, we were able to create a support for the mask. The digital model of the underside of the mask was printed and a support was made using the 3D print out rather than the original mask. In doing so, we made a custom mount for the fragile mask without the risks involved with excessive handling.

Speakers
ML

Morgan L Burgess

Fellow, National Museum of American History
Morgan Burgess graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2012 with a B.A. in Classical Archaeology and a minor in Studio Art. Her first conservation experiences were as an undergrad at the Mugello Valley Arcaheological Project: Poggio Colla Field School in Vicchio, Italy. After... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Olivia Primanis

Olivia Primanis

Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center
Olivia Primanis is the Senior Book Conservator at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, where she performs conservation treatments and manages the book lab and special projects. She is interested in general conservation and preservation subjects relating to library and museum... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

06. (Book and Paper) Ain’t No Mountain High Enough: Treatment of a board game with iron corrosion
While trained to work with different types of materials, conservators are sometimes presented with composite objects that are outside their area of expertise. The Newberry Library has some unusual board games in their collection that aren’t always made out of materials a book conservator is accustomed to. The Newberry recently acquired the 1955 board game Mt. Everest that includes a 3-dimentional folding mountain for the game board, designed so that magnets in the playing pieces stick to the board as the players “climb” the mountain. While this was an innovative idea at the time, the long term consequences of layering an iron sheet in the middle of the board were not considered. Now that the iron in the board is rusty, the board is delicate. The mountain is flaking apart at the corners and appears to have staining due to chemical reactions between the paper and iron. Stains are also present in portions of the box that were in contact with the board. The presence of iron precludes treatment with water as migration of iron ions would be detrimental over time, and the board would not survive an attempt to wash and chelate the rusted metal. Book and paper conservators usually work with iron in the form of iron gall ink or impurities left in the paper from contaminated water. While many lessons are transferable to this situation, most of the treatment procedures are not. Local objects conservators with experience working with metallic iron will be consulted for their experience treating corroded iron. The Newberry’s mission is to preserve items while also making them accessible to the public in the reading room. Particularly delicate items are more difficult to treat because they may be used more than would be ideal for their preservation. The condition of the board prevents patrons from assembling the original mountain without damage. In order to preserve the original, a facsimile will be created using archival materials so that library users can still get an idea of how the game was designed. The poster will focus on the tradeoffs between the need to preserve the game and allow researchers to experience the game using as many of the original components as possible. It will also explain the treatment conducted on the original (incorporating collaborative expertise) and the methods and materials used in constructing the facsimile.

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

07. (Collection Care) Cadmium Plating in Scientific and Technological Collections
Cadmium plating is a common surface treatment that has been used to protect iron alloys in military, automotive, aerospace, and other industrial fields throughout the 20th century. Cadmium is in limited use today due to its toxicity. The surface coating industry and military have made efforts to find suitable, safer alternatives, but none can replace the combination of cadmium’s unique characteristics as a single, cost-effective plating system. Cadmium serves as a sacrificial layer that preferentially corrodes before the substrate. The yellow- and white-colored corrosion products are loose and powdery thereby posing health and safety risks to those who come into contact with them. During a survey of the collection at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), more than 2100 objects were identified as having active cadmium corrosion and in need of immediate stabilization. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of information on how to identify, characterize, treat, and safely dispose of cadmium corrosion in the Conservation and Collections Management literature. While the dangers and deterioration of cadmium pigments have been explored in analysis of painted surfaces, to date only one conservation-focused article has endeavored to understand why metallic cadmium corrodes in technological collections. The limited, yet continued, use of cadmium in military and aerospace applications will continue to be problematic as NASM and other history and technology museums continue to collect. This poster will present the case study of a treatment methodology carried out on World War II era aircraft equipment. It will also present techniques for characterizing cadmium corrosion and provide practical health and safety guidelines for its treatment and disposal.

Speakers
avatar for Arianna Carini Johnston

Arianna Carini Johnston

Contractor, National Air and Space Museum
Arianna Carini has a MSc in Conservation Practice from Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. She graduated in 2013 and is originally from Bloomington, Indiana.

Co-Authors
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

08. (Collection Care) Mercuric Chloride Reduction on Feathers
Pesticides have historically been used in the museum environment to prevent, repel, destroy or mitigate pests in order to preserve collections. Many of these compounds, particularly heavy metal pesticides, are toxic to humans as well as pests (Pool et al. 2005). While heavy metal pesticides are no longer used in the museum environment their presence is acutely felt within collections as they do not dissipate and remain on treated artifacts (that may not be labeled as such), which can cross contaminate adjacent object (ibid). What might be more concerning, handling items treated with heavy metal pesticides presents a potential risk to those in contact with these collections. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to analyze feathers treated with mercuric chloride on twentieth century Kachina figures from the Buffalo Museum of Science. Six feathers were selected for treatment and three pesticide mitigation methods were compared. Two sample sets were solvent cleaned on a vacuum suction platen; one set with ethanol and the other with isopropyl alcohol. Another set was washed in a deionized water bath. The feathers, used blotters and wash water were analyzed to evaluate the movement of the mercuric chloride and effectiveness of these meditation methods.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Cashman

Stephanie Cashman

Graduate Fellow, Midwest Art Conservation Center
Stephanie is originally from Denver, Colorado where she received a BFA in Fine Art from the University of Denver. She is a recent graduate of the Buffalo State Garman Art Conservation Department specializing in objects conservation. Currently, Stephanie is the objects fellow at the... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Aaron Shugar

Dr. Aaron Shugar

Professor/Educator, Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo
Ph.D., University College London | M.S., University of Sheffield | B.A., York University | | Aaron Shugar, PhD | Dr. Aaron Shugar is currently the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Conservation Science in the Art Conservation Department, SUNY - Buffalo State. Dr. Shugar earned his... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

09. (Book and Paper) An Experimental Gel-Based Treatment of Iron Gall Ink Corrosion Halos: Sodium Metabisulfite and Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid Solution in Agarose Gel
A research project was carried out at Queen’s University to determine the effectiveness of an agarose gel-based treatment of iron gall ink corrosion halos using reducing agent sodium metabisulfite and chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid. The ink fabricated for this experiment contained the metal ions of iron, copper, and zinc to increase the amount of visible corrosion, as well as replicate historic inks that have metals other than iron in them. The experimental treatment accounts for the chelation of the copper and zinc ions from the paper substrate along with iron, which cannot currently be done using the widely accepted calcium phytate treatment, as phytate is iron selective. The effectiveness of this experimental treatment was primarily determined using qualitative methods of analysis. Photographic documentation, ultraviolet fluorescence, optical microscopy, scanning election microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis were the techniques that yielded the most useful results. Color spectrophotometry and pH measurements of the sample swatches yielded results that support observations made with the aforementioned techniques. Unfortunately, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, the main technique that would have confirmed the success of the treatment, did not yield results because of unknown error. Though no definite conclusions could be drawn on the effectiveness of the treatment, suggestions for future research and potential treatment procedures can be considered based on the results from the qualitative analyses.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly M Conlin

Kelly M Conlin

Conservator, Element Materials Technology
Kelly Conlin is a recent graduate of Queen's University's Art Conservation Program where she was a student in their Science Stream. At the Association for North American Graduate Programs in Conservation's annual meeting she gave an oral presentation of her preliminary research findings... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Rosaleen Hill

Rosaleen Hill

Art Conservation Program, Queen's University
Rosaleen Hill is Director and Assistant Professor - Paper Conservation, Photographic Materials and New Media for the Art Conservation Program at Queen's University.
avatar for Alison Murray

Alison Murray

Associate Professor, Conservation Science, Queen's University, Art Conservation Program
Alison Murray is the Associate Professor of Conservation Science for the Art Conservation Program at Queen's University. She is conducting a research program for characterizing and conserving modern materials, including acrylic paints and grounds; this research integrates information... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

10. (Book and Paper) (Un)Finished Thoughts: Approaches to Conserving Transitory States in the Working Documents of Gwendolyn Brooks
“Nothing that happens to you is inadmissible: anything that happens anywhere, anyhow, is valid material for poetry. Love, light, loss, liberty and laceration.” Gwendolyn Brooks, 1917-2000
Gwendolyn Brooks is one of the most influential American poets of the 20th century.  Coming of age in Bronzeville, Chicago, her works captured the trenchant existence of the black urban poor before/during Civil Rights.  Brooks went on to receive significant recognition and acclaim as the first Black author to receive the 1950 Pulitzer Prize, and she became the Poet Laureate for the State of Illinois in 1968.  In 2013, Gwendolyn Brooks’ archives were acquired by the University of Illinois Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML), consisting of over 100 boxes filled to the brim with her personal papers.
Brooks was an avid record keeper. Like her experiences, nothing that she wrote—letters, grocery lists, fragments of thought, food diaries, annotated pictures, homemade chapbooks and more—was inadmissible. Her singular, often editorial marginalia and labelling existed on most items she saved.  Moreover, the purposes of her retained materials transformed over time. Drafts became published works, published works became the starting point for new directions, middles became beginnings and beginnings became ends. And while the idiosyncrasy of a creator/collector might be present in any modern archive, Brooks’ papers are especially revealing of her personality, as well as of her innate need to impose a distinctive organization.  It was such a prominent feature of the unprocessed acquisition that it became a separate aspect of the collection that curators wanted to preserve in addition to the physical papers.
In setting out to stabilize Brooks’ “working documents” for an exhibit at the National Poetry Foundation in 2017, several salient issues came to fore.  Firstly, many of her most important drafts were recorded on poor, embrittled materials (deteriorated composition books, newsprint, fugitive inks etc.).  Secondly, much of Brooks’ creative process included intentional damage to her drafts (lacunae or whole pages purposefully removed or reordered).  Furthermore, as an archival and unprocessed collection in the RBML, a close relationship of communication had to be established between curator and conservator in order to make long-term care decisions that would not risk erasing or obscuring the heart of the material—Brook’s own care and keeping decisions made during her lifetime.
The state of flux of Brooks’ papers is an interesting if not challenging one for conservators. Early, we are taught to understand “ephemeral” objects and “temporary” bindings.  At least in these cases, the intellectual work is finished even if its presentation is problematic. But, what if the intellectual work was unfinished? What if the value of a document stemmed from its lack of finality, the fact that it was paused forever, mid-thought, mid-sentence? What if the content and not the form is “incomplete” or “ephemeral” or by its very nature, “transitory”? This poster will explore these questions through treatment case studies, as well as examine significant value of the curator/conservator relationship when making decisions for the long term care of such a rare and rich collection.

Speakers
avatar for Quinn Morgan Ferris

Quinn Morgan Ferris

Senior Conservator for Special Collections, University of Illinois
Quinn Morgan Ferris is the Senior Conservator for Special Collections at the University of Illinois Library at Urbana-Champaign, where she started as the Rare Book Conservator in 2016. Quinn's current position at the U of I includes conservation treatment and planning for Special... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

11. (Archaeological Conservation) Conservation in a Changing Climate: Examining the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Submerged Wooden Artifacts
Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is not only one of the leading factors of global warming, but also one of the leading contributors to continuing ocean acidification. The historic average for ocean pH is 8.2, but since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, this has decreased to 8.1. It is projected to reach a pH of 7.6 by 2100 if current concentration trends continue. Much research has been done by biologists and nature conservationists to address the effects this acidification could have on sea life. However, little research has been conducted on the effects ocean acidification has and could increasingly have on the degradation of underwater archaeological sites and remains. This study examines the effects of increased acidification on the preservation of waterlogged wooden artifacts, by examining sample degradation using SEM after prolonged submergence in solutions of varying acidities. These solutions are prepared to match the pH levels of past, present, and projected oceanic conditions. The study focuses on the effects of increased ocean acidity on woods commonly used in historic ship construction, specifically oak, cedar, and pine. It also draws on published climate projections to identify areas where sites are most at risk of increased degradation due to ocean acidification.

Speakers
avatar for Annabelle Fichtner

Annabelle Fichtner

Preprogram Student, University of Delaware, Undergraduate Program in Art Conservation


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

12. (Textiles) A preliminary evaluation of lining and surface patching techniques for doped aircraft fabric
Doped fabric is ubiquitous on historic aircraft found in the collection at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Doping is the practice of applying a waterproof coating to fabric, which also serves to shrink the material over a rigid structure. A doped surface is traditionally made of multiple coats of clear cellulose nitrate, acetate, and/or acetate butyrate applied over a cotton or linen fabric. These cellulosic resins, known as aircraft dope, have a limited usable lifespan once applied to flight surfaces as dictated by their material properties. As these resins age, they become brittle and shrink, sometimes cracking or splitting in the process. Because of the requirement for scheduled inspections of the structures beneath, doped fabric materials have long been considered dispensable and are expected to be replaced or patched during routine operational maintenance or restoration. Restoration practices for patching localized damage entails the application of patches with new dope according to strictly defined methods illustrated in the FAA Advisory, AC43.13. This irreversible application of new dope can lead to further damage to the surrounding areas as the fresh dope shrinks. Traditional restoration practices can compromise the authenticity of the aircraft through the re-fabrication, removal, or covering of battle damage, historic finishes, and original art. Alternative options to preserve original doped aircraft fabric in situ through lining and surface patching techniques require further research as these topics are not well published in the field of conservation. NASM conservation is currently deviating from long-established restoration protocols to develop new methods to preserve original fabrics. New processes being explored include full lining of fabric components and employing localized patches using conservation fabrics and adhesives. Visible surface patching from the exterior is necessary in many instances due to constraints of the aircraft structure. In cases where lining is required, it provides much needed support to damaged and structurally weakened doped fabric. Over the last two years, NASM conservation treatments of aircraft fabric included the application of surface patches with nylon gossamer and Lascaux 498 HV and full lining of doped fabrics with BEVA 371b onto Ceconite 102 (a polyester fabric). This poster assesses these past treatments and explores two additional adhesives (methylcellulose and a wheat starch paste/sturgeon glue blend) as potential surface patching materials. The patching and lining materials were tested using t-peel and lap/shear tests as evaluation tools to determine adhesive/bond strength. The goal of this research is to identify reversible and stable materials and techniques to replace traditional methods of restoration.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren M. Gottschlich

Lauren M. Gottschlich

Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 2012 from the University of Mary Washington, graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa; she completed majors in Art History, Studio Art, and Historic Preservation. Her classes fostered a keen interest in traditional art materials... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

13. (Research and Technical Studies) Sticking with it: Following up on HSC’s effort to develop a user-driven adhesives database
This past fall, the Heritage Science for Conservation group at Johns Hopkins University hosted a one day workshop, Adhesives in Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Industry and Conservators, with the aim of gathering information from participants towards developing a user-driven adhesives database. Through talks and break-out groups, intentions around data and functionality desired in an adhesives database were discussed. Two surveys were administered, one before and one after the workshop, that gathered data on different aspects of adhesives selection and use in conservation. These results were paired with the data gathered at the workshop to inform database design and implementation. The details of the workshop, survey results, and next steps are presented here.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea KI Hall

Andrea KI Hall

Student, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation testing... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Andrea KI Hall

Andrea KI Hall

Student, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation testing... Read More →
avatar for Molly McGath

Molly McGath

Conservation Scientist, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Molly K. McGath is the Analytical Chemist at The Mariners' Museum and Park. McGath received her doctorate from the University of Arizona in Materials Science and Engineering with a focus in Conservation Science. | Her current research includes studying the deterioration mechanisms... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Patricia McGuiggan

Dr. Patricia McGuiggan

Professor/Educator, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Dr. McGuiggan obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota.  During her Ph.D., she was a research scholar in the Applied Mathematics Department at the Australian National University working with Richard Pashley.  She spent 3 years as a postdoctoral... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

14. (Research and Technical Studies) Gamma Radiation of Cultural Heritage in Disaster Response
Disaster Preparedness Planning requires knowledge of the materials in a collection, their value, and information on the best treatments available. Often, treatments can only mitigate damage done to collections, following a disaster. In some instances, there are few options and treatment only allows for a window of time when the materials can then be digitized, or otherwise documented. The degree of damage, the size of the collection impacted, or the urgency of the disaster may require the use of techniques that otherwise are not typically used within the field. The use of such methods is exceptional and, as such, requires scientific investigation before the treatment needs to be used. This project addresses one such emergency treatment: the use of gamma radiation, and its immediate effects on materials within archive and paper-based collections. A set of surrogate materials was treated with gamma radiation to test how this treatment affects the materials. Colorimetry and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to discern if the materials underwent chemical change, and to discern which materials underwent the most change.

Speakers
avatar for Molly McGath

Molly McGath

Conservation Scientist, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Molly K. McGath is the Analytical Chemist at The Mariners' Museum and Park. McGath received her doctorate from the University of Arizona in Materials Science and Engineering with a focus in Conservation Science. | Her current research includes studying the deterioration mechanisms... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Jenn Foltz Cruickshank

Jenn Foltz Cruickshank

Conservator, Maryland State Archives
Jenn Foltz Cruickshank is a Conservator at the Maryland State Archives (MSA) in Annapolis, Maryland, starting in 1998, when she began as a conservation technician. She specializes in paper artifacts and photographs, custom rehousing and mounting solutions, pest management, and emergency... Read More →
avatar for Andrea KI Hall

Andrea KI Hall

Student, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation testing... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Patricia McGuiggan

Dr. Patricia McGuiggan

Professor/Educator, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Dr. McGuiggan obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota.  During her Ph.D., she was a research scholar in the Applied Mathematics Department at the Australian National University working with Richard Pashley.  She spent 3 years as a postdoctoral... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

15. (Textiles) Frass-tacular!: Textile Conservation Techniques Adapted to the Stabilization of Moth-Damaged Aircraft Fabric
Historic WWII bombers have not typically been the subject of innovative textile conservation treatments. However, a unique opportunity arose while the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) was evaluating 50 fabric panels used to insulate the Museum’s Martin B-26 Marauder, better known as Flak-Bait. This particular aircraft is most noteworthy for having flown over 200 successful missions during WWII and is one of the most authentic and historic aircraft in existence. The overall preservation goals for this aircraft are to stabilize as much original material as possible, reverse previous restoration efforts, and celebrate historic battle damage. The fabric panels that line the interior of Flak-Bait are only found in the front, or nose section of the aircraft. The majority of the panels are constructed from dyed fulled wool fabric, lined on the reverse with a thick layer of undyed cotton batting. This fabric structure is machine-sewn around a support border of perforated aluminum strips. Cadmium plated steel buttons are fed through the perforations in the aluminum boarder strips thereby securing the panels to the aircraft’s interior walls. The nose section of Flak Bait had been on display for forty years during which time the insulating fabric panels suffered a severe webbing clothes moth infestation, followed by a heavy-handed restoration to hide the moth damage. This earlier restoration effort utilized large adhesive-applied fabric patches to cover losses from moth damage that were then spray painted in-situ to match the surrounding fabric. Other condition issues affecting the textiles include embedded corrosion, light damage, accumulated frass, and areas of additional moth damage resulting in structural instability. This poster will serve as a case study of how textile conservation techniques were used to stabilize and aesthetically re-integrate original interior fabric panels that would otherwise have been completely replaced. The techniques employed include experimentation with rigid gels and C02 for adhesive reduction, needle- and wet-felted loss compensation, solvent cleaning for overpaint reduction and dry cleaning methods to remove frass. This poster will also discuss how the treatment decision-making process was influenced by a comprehensive understanding of these composite objects. The panels’ history, condition, range of materials and the proposed display environment influenced the treatment decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Meghann Kozak

Meghann Kozak

Engen Preprogram Conservation Fellow, National Air and Space Museum (NASM)
Meghann Kozak has an individualized B.A. concentrating in Chemistry, Critical Art Theory, Studio Art, and Art History with a minor in French Language from New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. Since receiving her degree, Kozak has been continuously gaining... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

16. (Textiles) Using SEM to Examine Metal Threads from the King's Bed (1672) at Knole House
This research report presents the results of a morphologic and compositional study of 4 different metal threads set-aside after a 1974-87 wet cleaning. These threads are from the ‘King’s Bed’, a late 17th century royal bed, now at Knole in Kent, England. Although the ‘King’s Bed’ is not currently in need of cleaning or restoration, analysis of the Knole House threads should help in determining the best plan for future conservation treatment. The threads were examined via SEM-EDS to confirm their elemental composition and morphology and provide an update on their condition. Multiple readings, both point and box field, were taken on each sample with an effort to sample all places that looked different (dark, light, scratched, edge, field…). The surface on the gold gilded samples was scratched and exhibited varying degrees of brightness. For these areas, multiple points on each sample were tested and the surface ‘mapped’ along lines to investigate if the composition varied between bright and dull areas or if corrosion products could be detected. Also a cross-sectional sample was prepared to investigate, if possible, the thickness of the gilded layer. Some readings at 10 and 7 kV were also attempted on the gold gilded surfaces in an effort to see if this could also give any insight into the thickness of the gilded layer. All threads were silver; one solid, and 3 with metal foil wrapped silk cores. The solid silver thread showed tooling striations indicating manufacturing by drawing, while high gold readings suggested possible gold gilding. The other treads were of cut metal foil wrapped about silk cores. However, their surface striations suggested different manufacturing methods. Attempts (including cross sections and low kV readings) were made to determine the thickness of the gold gilding while the EDS line-mapping tool helped correlate visual evidence with elemental composition. It was hoped that more information could be gleaned about corrosion products, but the threads appeared very clean, with scant evidence of either dust/dirt or Ag2S or AgCl corrosion products. No information was available on the detarnishing process 50 years ago. The very thin layers of gold gilding should be of interest as it is possible that the solid silver thread was gilded at one time. If so, this may have been removed during the previous cleaning. This SEM-EDS examination provided significant information on the manufacturing method and composition of the metal threads.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Murphy

Erin Murphy

Assistant Conservator, The Field Museum
Erin is an Assistant Conservator at The Field Museum. There she is working on the redevelopment of the Native North American hall and joined the Field Museum’s staff in August 2018. She recently served as the Marshall Steel Senior Conservation Intern, Archaeological Collections... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

17. (Architecture) Challenges in Documenting Historic Finishes During Construction at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, MD
Enoch Pratt Library serves as a case study, demonstrating the challenges of completing time-pressure paint investigations in the midst of the construction phase. EverGreene was contracted to determine the original decorative scheme in seven spaces and rooms on the second floor of the library. Decorative finishes, particularly on a large scale project such as this, communicate with one another. Though the rooms are different, colors often overlap, and schemes and patterns can be repeated throughout to create a cohesion between rooms. At the Pratt Library, research and precise documentation became increasingly difficult as selective demolition and renovation activities created tremendous time pressures during the study. In addition to the current renovation project, many of the walls had been previously demolished, and ceilings were significantly perforated with post-historic mechanical systems and lighting. In some cases, it was impossible to review conditions to clarify issues raised during sample examination, and in-situ reveals had to be matched immediately, because the finishes would no longer exist shortly after they had been examined. Recommendations often had to be made on the spot, making client interest and interaction a key part of the process. Combining physical investigations with archival research, conservators were challenged to document colors and composition of stenciling as well as freehand decorative and figurative work on plaster walls and ceilings, even as ongoing demolition reduced the contextual evidence in historic spaces. Each new discovery revealed by the investigation added perspective to the design process, which was driven by a desire to honor the historic decoration while accommodating present-day aesthetic tastes. Keeping lines of communication open between the conservation team, the design team, and the building owner was crucial in the selection of colors and decorative motifs for the renovation process.

Speakers
avatar for Brooke W. Young Russell-[PA]

Brooke W. Young Russell-[PA]

Architectural Conservator, EverGreene Architectural Arts, Inc.
Brooke Young Russell is an Architectural Conservator and has been employed by EverGreene Architectural Arts since 2016. Brooke acquired her Masters of Science in Historic Preservation from Columbia University's GSAPP in 2013 and feels fortunate enough to exercise her love of paint... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

18. (Objects) The Use and Effect of Pickering Particle Emulsions and Cyclomethicone Cleaning Systems in the Treatment of Hair in Water-Sensitive Composite Objects
Keratinaceous materials, including animal hair, have long been used in the manufacture of utilitarian and art objects. The cleaning of composite objects constructed of hair attached to water-sensitive material now presents a challenge to conservators. In recent years Pickering particle emulsions and cyclomethicone have been used with great success in the cleaning and protecting of water-sensitive painted surfaces. Through a case study of the treatment of a 19th century hearth brush (1958.2326) from the Winterthur Museum collection, this research assesses the use of Velvesil™ Plus emulsions and D4 cyclomethicone, also known as D4 silicone solvent, in the aqueous cleaning of natural hair bristles attached to a wooden substrate. To test the effectiveness of Pickering particle emulsions and cyclomethicone in the treatment of hair, a soiled hair sample from the Winterthur hearth brush was trisected. One section was left uncleaned; a second cleaned with 10% deionized water in Velvesil™ Plus and D4 cyclomethicone and left unrinsed; and the third cleaned with the same solution and rinsed with D4 cyclomethicone. The three samples, representing the hair before, during, and after cleaning, were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy- energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), secondary electron imaging, and false color elemental mapping to asses the ability of the emulsion to remove embedded grime, to identify residual cleaning agents, and to visualize possible damage to the hair structure. Results showed the Velvesil™ Plus emulsion effectively cleaned the hair with minimal residues and no damage to the hair’s microstructure. The cleaning system was then applied in the treatment of the Winterthur hearth brush. The complete cleaning method included saturating the bristle bundles and wooden bristle board with silicone solvent to prevent the emulsion from absorbing into the wood and preventing the swelling and trapping of residues. The Velvesil™ Plus emulsion was then applied by brush and cosmetic sponge and rinsed from the surface with additional applications silicone solvent. This treatment method showed a drastic macroscopic improvement to the hair’s color, sheen, and pliability based on overall visual examination after treatment. A Pickering particle emulsion cleaning system combined with cyclomethicone masking of sensitive material is a promising method for the treatment of hair in composite objects, allowing for careful and controlled cleaning of soiled keratinaceous materials.

Speakers
avatar for Amaris Sturm

Amaris Sturm

Conservator, Cleveland Museum of Art


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

19. (Objects) Cosmetics as artifacts: the analysis and conservation of a 1930s theatrical makeup kit
A 1930s era theatrical makeup kit in the collection the Buffalo Museum of Science was analyzed and treated at the Garman Family Art Conservation Department at Buffalo State College. The kit, contained within a tinplated-steel L. Leichner brand expandable makeup box, was tightly packed with 105 individual items that included: paper, metal, and glass containers of powder- and cream-based cosmetics that had broke, spilled and smeared; insect-eaten wool crepe hairs; makeup-stained cotton balls; degrading plastics; and paper documents, including a hand-written journal with notations made in lipstick. The kit was gifted to the museum in 1983, where it had since remained in storage. Discussions with the curator lead to the idea that the kit, while not typical of the museum’s collections, could nonetheless serve as an interesting launching-off point into science for visitors interested in cosmetics or the theatre. A treatment philosophy was developed that would approach the kit as an “archeological artifact,” with the goal of maintaining the kit’s original appearance as it was assembled by its owner. Materials analysis, treatment and preventive conservation strategies were employed in tandem to stabilize the object group for display and storage. Materials analysis was performed to gather information about the components of the make-up kit that could be used to inform decisions about treatment and display. Significantly, the box’s strong “old makeup” odor was considered a potential concern to both to the paper and metal components in the box and to other objects housed nearby it. The questions posed for the first phase of analysis were: what types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) comprise this strong “old makeup” smell? Could these components be problematic to other materials? In collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, solid-phase microextraction headspace analysis (HS-SPME) was performed on the unopened box and some components, to detect volatile and semi-volatile species present. In a second step, experiments to replicate a “low fi” approach to non-invasive VOC analysis were performed in the BSC science laboratory. Pellets of sorbents were tested for their ability to adsorb VOCs from a two strong off-gassing objects and low temperature pyrolysis was performed to desorb analytes for gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis (py-GC-MS). A third phase of analysis began with research into the history of theatrical cosmetics to lend context to the historical moment from which the items emerged. This is best emblematized by the greasepaints, the main group of objects in the kit and the precursor to modern-day foundation. To characterize colorants, six pink greasepaints in the kit were sampled for analysis that combined X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (transmission-FTIR), optical microscopy (OM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and selective py-GC-MS. In the treatment phase, extensive collaboration from across the BSC conservation department was solicited in order to approach a variety of object types including: mends to sprung three-dimensional paper containers filled with cosmetics, fills in broken glass jars, stabilization of a hand-written journal, and fabrication of missing metal components.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Wilcop

Mary Wilcop

Fellow in Objects Conservation, Yale University Art Gallery
Mary Wilcop is the Fellow in Objects Conservation at the Yale University Art Gallery. She was previously a third-year graduate intern in Objects Conservation at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Mary received her M.A./C.A.S. in Art Conservation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nathan Eddingsaas

Nathan Eddingsaas

Assistant Professor, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Rochester Institute of Technology
avatar for Jonathan Thornton

Jonathan Thornton

Conservation Professor, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo State)
Jonathan Thornton has taught objects conservation at the Art Conservation Department since 1980. Following an earlier career as an artist/silversmith, he studied conservation in this department when it was still located in Cooperstown, NY, and received his M. A. and Certificate of... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

20. (Book and Paper) An In Depth Treatment Study of Humidification and Flattening in Paper Conservation
This presentation will provide an overview of an in depth study of humidification and flattening of paper based artworks/artifacts conducted during a Cathleen A. Baker Fellowship at the University of Michigan Library. Humidification and flattening of paper is one of the most fundamental components of a book and/or paper conservator’s practice, and while it may seem basic or rudimentary the finesse required when selecting the techniques, materials and methodologies to employee in a given situation should not be discounted. When it comes to determining the appropriate procedure for reducing planar distortions in a paper support Material Matters! Factors inherent to the paper itself including the fiber type, processing, sheet formation and finishing affect how the paper will react with the environment and in treatment; by isolating variables and using a standard set of sample papers that reflect a wide range of paper supports typically seen in museum, library and archival collections a more comprehensive understanding of the treatment process can be achieved. The primary aim of this project was to combine a through literature review with personal interviews with practicing conservators of various career levels and training backgrounds to formulate a series of practical experiments which would inform my personal knowledge of the subject. Comparative data- both quantitative and qualitative in nature- in the form of dimensional measurements, observations of surface texture and planarity and efficacy provide insight into manipulating the vast array of humidity delivery systems coupled with restraint drying set-ups to achieve the desired outcome. In the end there is no silver bullet, there is no one "go to" system that will work for all papers in all situations but there are ways to tailor most any system to achieve the goal for each paper.

Speakers
avatar for Kesha Talbert-[PA]

Kesha Talbert-[PA]

Associate Paper Conservator, HF Group/ECS Conservation
Kesha Talbert joined ECS in 2012 as an Assistant Paper Conservator. She earned her Master’s degree in Art Conservation with a specialization in paper conservation from the State University of New York Buffalo State College. During her graduate studies she completed internships at... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

21. (Book and Paper) Mass Deacidification Carrier Fluid Selection to Protect Media
In order to build an alkaline reserve in paper that neutralizes acids already present and protects against acids adsorbed in the future, most mass deacidification processes use a liquid carrier to deliver alkaline particles or solutes. While certain mass deacidification carrier fluids in use today are inert, others are toxic, flammable, and odoriferous. A few significant carriers (heptane, HMDS) are industrial solvents capable of changing the appearance of susceptible media. Although vendors using more aggressive fluids screen collections for media compatibility, given the hundreds of thousands of artifacts undergoing mass deacidification yearly, we can expect loss of historic and artistic content. We have performed several experiments, taking thousands of measurements in the CIELAB color space to quantify the color change of an increasingly large number of relevant media (highlighters, stamp pad ink, colored pencils, markers) on relevant acidic (book and bond) papers. Measuring before and after mechanical action while submerged in relevant mass deacidification carrier fluids in use today (perfluorohexane isomers, heptane, and hexamethyldisiloxane—HMDS) gauges their susceptibility to color change during treatment. We concluded that perfluorinated hydrocarbons seldom if ever cause noticeable changes in color density of even of the most fugitive media. By contrast heptane and HMDS produce changes noticeable to the human eye. Therefore, carrier chemistry is an important though underappreciated criterion in the selection of mass deacidification methods.

Speakers
avatar for John W. Baty

John W. Baty

Conservator, Preservation Technologies
Collaborating with Preservation Technologies’ leading team of scientists and engineers, John Baty is responsible for research and development, process improvement, quality assurance, and other duties within this world leader in supplying services, products, and equipment to preserve... Read More →
LV

La Verne Lopes

Senior QC Technician, Preservation Technologies, L.P.

Co-Authors
KJ

Kent John

Dispersion Production, QC, and R&D Technician, Preservation Technologies, LP
N/A

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

22. (Collection Care) Nothing is Ever Simple: A Case Study in Flexible Project Management for Archives Conservation
Project parameters can change substantially from initial planning once work begins, particularly with large archival collections. In this case, several changes required a re-evaluation of the methods, processes and techniques used. The size of the collection tripled, staff discovered significant mold damage, and environmental conditions truncated treatment time. This poster will describe how I was able to adjust treatment processes and techniques to accommodate rapidly changing project needs. The legal records of the Leo Hershkowitz Collection (TAM 415) were initially thought to be the simplest of three collections to be treated as part of the Gardiner Project. This evaluation was based on staff experience with tri-folded legal documents and what eventually proved to be an extremely biased sample used in initial project planning. Once I began treatment, I discovered that the 150 boxes of the collection were larger than originally thought, tripling the size of the collection, that the paper was more brittle, and that many more inks were present than the sample indicated. Archives staff discovered extensive mold contamination when they began to inventory the collection, prompting me and other conservation staff to conduct an emergency survey of the material, revealing that 10% of the collection had extensive mold contamination. The initial workflow had to be entirely re-written. In order to manage the increased volume of work I triaged treatment steps, eventually using minimal surface cleaning and passive flattening. I ruled out humidification due to the variety of inks present, so flattening was performed only with the lab’s ambient seasonal humidity, meaning flattening was unexpectedly confined to the wetter spring and summer months as the lab’s HVAC system is unable to provide humidification in New York City’s dry winter months. As this was only one of three collections I was responsible for, there were not enough staff hours to cope with the mold, so I collaborated with an outside vendor who was able to perform mold remediation as well as some of the cleaning and flattening to NYU Libraries’ specifications. By maintaining a flexible approach to project management, and adjusting treatment plans throughout the process, the project is on track to meet goals despite serious initial setbacks.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Bero

Alexander Bero

Conservator, NYU Libraries
Alex Bero is a Special Collections Conservator at New York University. He holds a Masters of Science in Information Studies with a Certification of Advanced Study in Book and Paper Conservation from the University of Texas at Austin. He has experience at the American Museum of Natural... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

23. (Collection Care) Biblio-Archaeology: A Codicological Inventory, Condition Survey and Preservation Needs Assessment of Pre-Modern Codices and Incunabula in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection of the OSU Libraries
For the Undergraduate Summer Library Research Fellowship, I conducted condition surveys, a codicological inventory and preservation needs assessment of 48 pre-modern codices and 98 incunabula in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library (RBML) of the OSU Libraries. In my proposal I planned to assess all physical features, general condition and the preservation needs of each item under the supervision and guidance of OSU Libraries’ Book and Paper Conservator, Harry Campbell and the OSUL RBML Curator, Eric Johnson (my supervisors). I researched the fundamentals of building and operating a condition survey by reaching out to those who have had years of experience in conservation. I quickly became accustomed with the subject matter and created a reference document of descriptive elements that guided me through each evaluation which I adapted into my condition survey design. Upon the completion of the condition surveys I created a catalogue that would help organize 146 bound items from the RBML and guide faculty and students through the data. While it is designed to provide concise information, the individual condition surveys of each item can provide greater (or additional) detail. Condition work for special collections often go overlooked, but I was able to create a strong foundation for the recorded conditions of bound medieval manuscripts and incunabula in the RBML. I look forward to the hands-on conservation work that Harry Campbell has pre-approved for the manuscripts and incunabula that are in need of attention as part of my job as a student assistant technician in the Conservation Unit. I am hopeful that the condition and needs assessment survey I designed specifically for the RBML will become standard practice, and continue to be used to record physical aspects for future acquisitions, as well as provide an informative source for augmenting item records in the OSUL online catalog.

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Demmerle

Danielle Demmerle

Student Assistant, The Ohio State University Libraries Conservation Unit
I am a fourth year undergraduate at The Ohio State University Columbus campus. I am majoring in Medieval and Renaissance Studies with a minor in English and Studio Art. I am a student assistant at The Ohio State University Conservation Unit where I work with Harry Campbell, the head... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

24. (Book and Paper) Pineapple Paper - A New Material from Taiwan for Paper Conservation
This article will introduce “Pineapple paper”, which was developed and produced in Taiwan since 1970. Paper, one of the most important materials in paper conservation. In Eastern conservation field, there are several types of paper that are well-known by conservators, such as Minogami and Kozo Paper from Japanese, as well as Xuan Paper from China. Meanwhile, with the increasing variety of paper material and their characteristic, new conservation papers are then considered using to enrich the choices for conservators and helpfully to meet different conservation needs. Pineapple Paper was produced to conform to this requirement. Pineapple Paper is made in the process similar to traditional Xuan Paper. It presents Taiwanese environmental characters and integrates environment protection. This paper not only has the characteristic of visual pure color and elegant quality as traditional Xuan Paper but also paper strength advantage as Japanese paper. In addition, it hardly shows deterioration or discoloration after aging test procedures. In recent years, Pineapple Paper is starting to be accepted and used by Eastern painting and paper conservators in Taiwan for conservation and preservation. Furthermore, was also made especially for a famous Chinese Artist Chang Dai-Chien. In the article, we will also introduce the production process of Pineapple Paper, its paper characteristics and conservation case studies. We wishing that paper conservators who have not yet aware of this material to have one more choice in his paper material cabinet for future conservation work.

Speakers
avatar for Ting-Fu Fan

Ting-Fu Fan

Conservator, San-Jian Art & Conservation 三間
Founder & Chief Conservator, San-Jian Art & Conservation (三間) , Taipei & Hong Kong (2008~NOW) | ----------------- | 2018 Asian Cultural Council (ACC) Grantee. | 2016 Project Coordinator, the First International Conference on Appreciation Collection and Conservation of the Ancient... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

25. (Collection Care) The conservation of textile linings and seal cords- with a little help from textile and paintings conservation
This project confronts the often varying and complex problems encountered in book and paper conservation: the need to establish a minimal conservation treatment solution that remains sympathetic to the original document. In this case, two objects were treated adopting and adapting textile and painting conservation techniques, which here have been successfully applied for in situ treatments on two archival paper and parchment documents with textile components: • IR 130/41/22 - a nineteenth paper map lined with linen, torn with big losses in the fabric • E 24/18/1 – a sixteenth century parchment charter with a large wax pendant seal, with split silk braided cords. Both objects are part of the collections of the National Archives, the official archive for the UK government for England and Wales. Both identified as being ‘unfit for production’, due to their fragile physical state after a condition survey completed in 2010. With such fragile objects, it is expected that the treatment process from beginning to completion will be both testing and time consuming. As the traditional method of removing the original linen lining from the verso of paper maps would have severely affected IR 130/41/22 original structure, an in-situ treatment was devised from a method usually applied to cotton canvases in paintings conservation: the thread by thread tear mending, a variation of the Heiber technique. This in-situ treatment method successfully provided the means to retain all elements of the original map while at the same time stabilising the map allowing it to be accessed, once again, by the public. The damage associated with E 24/128/1, a sixteenth century parchment charter with a large wax pendant seal on degraded silk braided cords is a common problem within many collections. This provided the conservator with the challenge to retain the original structure of the silk cords while still attached to the seal and the parchment charter. The chosen treatment is an adaptation on the sewing cord repair of fifteenth century incunabula as published by Birgit Speta in 2003. In the case of the charter E 24/128/1 each of the original silk braided cords were partially broken and holding on only by individual silk threads. The treatment involved the addition and securing of new silk threads to the split original threads in order to stabilise the whole cord. For this, preliminary tests were undertaken in order to establish an appropriate choice of repair materials and repair procedures. The threads were secured in place supported by new cotton and silk threads, the chosen adhesive Lascaux 498H provided strength and at the same time sufficient flexibility to allow for the threads to be re-braided and stabilise what remained of the original cord. This method provided a way to retain all elements of the original silk cords while remaining attached to the parchment charter. The treatment solutions for the map and the charter proved to be highly successful in making the objects once again accessible to the general public, whilst maintaining their historical structure.

Speakers
SF

Solange FitzGerald

Conservation Manager, The National Archives
Solange FitzGerald has worked at the National Archives as a paper and book conservator since 2002. For the past 15 years she has led and worked extensively on the varied and often challenging book projects. The conservation work within the archive collection covers a wide range of... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

27. (Research and Technical Studies) The Permeation of Vapors through Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films
Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, aka Mylar® or Melinex®, are widely used materials within conservation. One of the most common uses of these films is for encapsulation. Our studies have shown that water can permeate through the PET whereas formic acid vapor permeates at a much slower rate and acetic acid vapor permeates even more slowly, if at all. The rate of permeation is dependent upon the molecular diameter of the vapor. The varying rates of penetration have a two-fold impact. One, they can act as a protecting layer against some hazardous volatile compounds within polluted environments. Two, they can trap hazardous volatile compounds within enclosures, creating a microenvironment which maybe hazardous to cultural heritage objects.The data suggests that deacidification should be performed prior to encapsulation.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Patricia McGuiggan

Dr. Patricia McGuiggan

Professor/Educator, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Dr. McGuiggan obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota.  During her Ph.D., she was a research scholar in the Applied Mathematics Department at the Australian National University working with Richard Pashley.  She spent 3 years as a postdoctoral... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Andrea KI Hall

Andrea KI Hall

Student, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation testing... Read More →
avatar for Molly McGath

Molly McGath

Conservation Scientist, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Molly K. McGath is the Analytical Chemist at The Mariners' Museum and Park. McGath received her doctorate from the University of Arizona in Materials Science and Engineering with a focus in Conservation Science. | Her current research includes studying the deterioration mechanisms... Read More →
avatar for Bill Minter

Bill Minter

Senior Book Conservator, Pennsylvania State University Library
William “Bill” Minter is currently senior book conservator for The Pennsylvania State University Libraries. Previously, he worked with the post-doctoral fellows in the Heritage Science for Conservation group at Johns Hopkins University. And during this time, he has maintained... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

28. (Architecture) Art or Awful: The Preservation and Conservation of Graffiti
Graffiti is a drawing or inscription made on a wall or other surface, usually without permission, so as to be seen by the public. It’s done for many different reasons like self-expression, boredom, or disrespect. When does graffiti go from an act of vandalism to be immediately removed, to an artful expression which should be saved and shared? Graffiti has a long and proud history dating back to Ancient Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire. The oldest graffiti at Pompeii is a simple Gaius was here, or more precisely, “Gaius Pumidis Dilphilus was here” dated October 3, 78 B.C. It is a classic that stands the test of time, as anyone familiar with Kilroy knows. Graffiti comes in many different forms: from carving in stone, spray paint on a brick wall, marker on a marble statue, pencil on walls, etching on glass, to stickers on everything. Although graffiti has become an accepted art form, there is still a wide chasm between work exhibited in a museum and work done without the permission of the property owner. The National Park Service has two documents related to the removal of graffiti: Keeping it Clean and “Preservation Brief 38: Removing Graffiti from Masonry” both dating to 1995. But information and guidelines on the preservation of graffiti is scarce. Papers have been presented on the conservation of murals and graffiti-style street art, but what about graffiti that was created just as an act of defacement? What makes some graffiti worth saving while other requires swift removal? It is easy to be fascinated by graffiti left by a Rear Admiral of the British Navy on the Temple of Dendur in 1817, and less so by the spray-painted tag found on your garage. Is there really a difference between Keith Haring’s mural “Once Upon a Time” in the men’s bathroom of The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center and the penises that (for reasons unknown) boys love to draw on any vertical surface? Although many factors go into the decision to remove or preserve, some of the most important are age, context, and the artist. Graffiti exists in our public spaces, our communities, and our streets. It can be thoughtful, crude, political, humorous, simple, artistic, territorial, offensive, creative, or a combination of these. Can conservators work together to create guidelines and standards for the preservation and conservation of graffiti? Or is it like many issues of conservation where the answer is “It depends?” Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc. has worked on several graffiti-related projects including the preservation of pencil graffiti on wallpaper in a museum, protection and conservation treatments to a spray-painted graffiti mural in a previously industrial neighborhood, and the removal of offensive graffiti from the side of a church. This presentation will discuss how each of these projects required us to stop and think about the consequences of removal versus preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie M. Hoagland-[PA]

Stephanie M. Hoagland-[PA]

Principal, Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc.
Stephanie M. Hoagland is a Principal and Architectural Conservator with Jablonski Building Conservation Inc. where she has been employed since 2003. She has a Master of Science in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

29. (Objects) On A Roll: A New Artifact Support Approach during the Treatment of Cannons
Supporting and rotating heavy and cumbersome objects throughout the treatment process can present a real challenge. This problem is especially true when it comes to the conservation of cannons. The awkward size, shape, and weight of cannons makes it difficult to conduct surface cleaning and coating because work can only progress so far before the objects have to be turned over. This task is often carried out by having the objects elevated on wooden blocks which enables them to be carefully rolled over by hand to expose a new side to work. This process can be time consuming, requires the participation of several staff members, and can lead to surface abrasion of the objects and/or recently applied coatings. Therefore, when the conservation staff at The Mariners’ Museum and Park in Newport News, Virginia was asked to treat several cannon within the museum’s collection, it provided an opportunity to develop a new support approach. This led to the fabrication of a wheeled mount that held the cannons in an elevated horizontal position while at the same time through the use of a bearing system allowed the objects to be freely rotated. The use of the new support device during the conservation of the cannons resulted in a much easier and safer treatment for both staff and objects. This poster will provide an overall description of the construction and operation of the new support structure as well as highlight how the system could be modified for use with other kinds of large objects.

Speakers
avatar for William Hoffman

William Hoffman

Director of Conservation, The Mariners' Museum
Will Hoffman received his Master's degree in art conservation from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 2009 specializing in the conservation of objects. He received Bachelors’ degrees in Anthropology and Fine Arts at The State University of New York College at Buffalo in... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

30. (Electronic Media) Using Open Source Software as New Media artworks restoration method and evaluate its pros and cons: A case study of New Media Art collection of National Museums in Taiwan.
In recent years, New Media Art has become one of the mainstreams Art trend in Taiwan. As museum starts to collect those artworks, how to preserve and conserve the New Media Artworks also becomes a challenge for those Contemporary Collecting Institutes. Comparing to the New Media Art preservation and conservation pioneers, such as U.S and some European countries, it seems Taiwan has started a little bit late. Due to the lack of experience, when National Museums in Taiwan face the challenge, there are rarely no in-field references to consult. This is a case study about the restoration of a New Media artwork, “Goang-ming Yuan, The Reason For Insomnia,1998 “, which its original software malfunction that trigger the interaction between the artwork and the audience is no longer capable to debug the software error. During the research, there are already some Contemporary and New Media Art conservation team from U.S and European countries chose Open Source Software as a tool to conserve these kinds of artworks. In this conservation project, museum members also decided to migrate the original Software to Open Source Software. After the migration, the works has return to its original function and able to exhibit again. This research focus on the New Media Art collection of National Museums in Taiwan, try to use Open Source Software as a technical method to conserve New Media Artworks, and evaluates its superiority and risk that may cause from the method.

Speakers
avatar for Tzu-chuan Lin

Tzu-chuan Lin

Museum Administrator, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts
Tzu-Chuan Lin works as a Project Coordinator at the Collection Management Department of National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts (NTMoFA) since 2014. He implemented the Taiwan Tech X Art Innovation Program which combines important collections of the museum with digital technology. He holds... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

31. (Research and Technical Studies) Degradation makers of cellulose acetate during aging
Being the first cellulose derivative that has been put into commercial production, CA (cellulose acetate) is a material that was used extensively in the 20th century by the film industry as well as by artists to create fine and decorative art. Compared with traditional material used in cultural heritage, cellulose acetate is a chemically unstable material resulting in shrinkage and deformation even at room temperature (such as “Little Large Glass” by Marcel Duchamp, Yale University Art Gallery). The material may has suffered from severely degradation when visible changes are found. It’s important to have proper evaluation of its preserve condition. Currently, scientists are concentrating on case studies instead of systemic research. In light of such situation, based on the review of plenty literature, several chemistry analysis methods are applied in this research, in order to find the degradation makers during degradation of cellulose acetate in different scales. Modern scientific methods such as SEM, FTIR, GPC and XRD are hired to explain degradation makers of cellulose acetate, providing support in the aspect of evaluation of degradation of cellulose acetate. The results showed deformation, curling and newly formed pores with the diameter in micrometer scale appears with the processing of degradation. The change of crystallinity differs from samples with different plasticizer content and artificial ageing in different conditions. The molecular weight experienced a significant decreasing during aging, while the molecular weight distribution didn’t see the same trend. Data from FTIR proves the characterization vibration bond changes. It should be highlighted the peak attributes to unbound water appears during ageing. Data from TGA-FTIR proves that the amount of thermal violate material decreases while degradation happens. The trend comes more significant with higher plasticizer content. Thermoporometery based on DSC analysis is an efficient method to characterize the pore structure in porous materials. Results from DSC and SEM shows that pore size of 7nm was found in all cellulose acetate samples, the diameter increase with the degradation. Cellulose acetate with 20% plasticizer content owns bigger pores compared with cellulose acetate ( 7.892 nm-9.347 nm). Interestingly, new pore with radius of 2.255nm appears in cellulose acetate with 20% plasticizer content. For the first time, a systemic research has been applied to investigate degradation makers, the results offer scientific support for cellulose acetate study as well as related micro-climate design.

Speakers
LL

Liu Liu

Postdoc Associate, Northwestern Polytechnical University
Being trained as a conservation scientist, Liu received her PhD of Conservation Science in 2017 from University of Science and Technology of China. She hold a bachelor degree of Material Chemistry and was a visiting assistant in research in Yale-Institute for the Preservation of Cultural... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lukasz Bratasz

Lukasz Bratasz

Head of Sustainable Heritage, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Łukasz Bratasz received his PhD in 2002 from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. In the same year, he joined the staff of the Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, where he remains a research fellow. He was a head... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

32. (Contemporary Art) Conservation of The Spirit of Sunday in Shaw by Billy Colbert; Challenges of Treatment Design and Execution for Oversized, Contemporary, Multimedia Artwork
This poster will present the treatment of an oversized, contemporary, multimedia artwork in the collection of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The Spirit of Sunday in Shaw by Billy Colbert is a varnished and screen printed artwork on two found photographs printed on RC paper and attached to separate aluminum panels using a pressure-sensitive adhesive. The aluminum panels are attached with screws to a wood and aluminum framework for display and installation. Commissioned for the space, the artwork has hung in the Washington Convention Center since 2003. Shortly after installation, the artwork developed large, snaking, draw-like distortions across the surface that cyclically worsened and improved every summer and winter until they were permanently held in place just four years after installation. In addition to these distortions, one of the aluminum panel supports was warped, bulging outward at the central join of the two panels. These problems compromised the stability and visual integrity of the artwork, thus necessitating conservation treatment. Consultation with the artist in addition to a collaboration between, paintings, photography, and paper conservators allowed for a multidisciplinary approach to be developed. An extensive testing phase was implemented, not only to examine the solubility parameters of the materials, but to design methods that would be effective in treating the artwork. This phase included the creation of mock-ups to determine how the artwork could be re-assembled if removed from the aluminum panels. In addition to defining an appropriate treatment, it was necessary to discuss the cause of the distortions in the support and what steps would be required to prevent them from recurring. With all the data gathered, confident that conservation intervention would stabilize the support and significantly improve the visual appearance of the artwork, a treatment was designed and executed to remove the varnished and screen printed RC paper from the aluminum support, eliminate the distortions, modify the aluminum panel and framework support, and finally re-attach the artwork back onto the aluminum panels and framework. While art in public spaces is often subject to less than ideal conditions for preservation, the Washington Convention Center was willing to collaborate with conservators to improve the installation location and maintain a more consistent display environment for the artwork.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Loudermilk

Kristen Loudermilk

Conservator of Paintings, ARTEX Conservation Laboratory
Kristen earned her BS in Biochemistry, BA in Chemistry, and BA in Art History from Virginia Tech in 2003 and her Master’s in Art Conservation with a specialty in Paintings from Queen’s University in 2005. She has practiced paintings conservation at the ARTEX Conservation Laboratory... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

33. (Archaeological Conservation) The Wild West Comes to Southern Maryland: The conservation of three solder dot cans from Deadwood, South Dakota
Located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in Southern Maryland, the Maryland Archaeological Conservation (MAC) Laboratory is a tailor-made, state-of-the-art facility where conservation, archaeological research, and curation of Maryland’s archaeological collections occur. The MAC Laboratory not only conserves the State’s archaeological collections but also provides conservation services and guidance to Cultural Resource Management firms, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and museums throughout the United States. Over the past few years, the MAC Laboratory has steadily built a rapport with the City of Deadwood, in South Dakota, while conserving a variety of historic artifacts from their archaeological collections. In September of 2016, the City of Deadwood sent three metal solder dot cans with paper labels to the MAC Laboratory for conservation treatment. Each cylindrical can has a lead soldered seam along the side, a lead solder-filled hole in the lid, and are likely made of tin-plated iron. The cans are part of a collection of artifacts that were unearthed during the relocation of a historic structure, known as the Fountain House, within the city in March of 2015. The cans arrived at the lab with a corroded metal surface and stains and soil partially obscuring the fragile and fragmentary paper food labels that were still in situ. The artifacts presented a unique conservation challenge, as the paper labels had to be detached entirely from the metal can in order to treat the materials separately. Each material required a different approach to cleaning and stabilization. This poster will highlight the collaborative nature of the project and the techniques employed to conserve these uncommon archaeological objects.

Speakers
avatar for Francis Lukezic

Francis Lukezic

Conservator, Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory
Frances Lukezic is an objects conservator at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory and is currently a Co-Chair of AIC’s Archaeological Discussion Group. She has an MSc in Conservation from Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. Previously, she has worked at the... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

34. (Research and Technical Studies) Integrated Approaches to the Conservation of Multi-Component Systems - A Case Study with Dog Tags
This study examined the components of a set of dog tags from the movie Deer Hunter in the De Niro collection at the Harry Ransom Center. More specifically, this entailed the development of a set of analytical techniques to identify the composition of all item components along with the subsequent development of a long-term housing and exhibition solutions. Robert De Niro represents one of the most prominent actors in modern film, and many of his works a snapshot of the American identity throughout the latter half of the 20th century. The De Niro Collection at the Ransom Center subsequently represents an all-encompassing archive, housing materials with a wide variety of compositions, all of which have shown differing degrees of degradation, particularly those composed of plastics. The dog tags in particular represent one of these items, comprising two metal dog tags attached by a chain enclosed in a plastic covering. This enclosure was a typical characteristic of tags assigned during the Vietnam War, the setting of the Deer Hunter movie, to silence the metal during combat and protect it from the humid environment. Ironically, this plastic covering has contributed most to the degradation of the item, with leaching contributing to the corrosion of the metal underneath. The challenges of the project ultimately came down to finding the proper pieces of equipment to effectively identify the composition of the dog tags along with their covering, as well as the source of the exudate. We chose methods with an eye towards applications to similar projects and mixed compositions. The project utilized a combination of Infrared Spectroscopy along with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry to identify the main composition of the plastic covering along with the liquid present at the interface between the tags and their enclosing. This was combined with X-ray Fluorescence to identify the metals in the tags themselves along with any oxides forming at their surface. This has not only allowed the discovery of the source of the degradation, leaching of phthalate plasticizers, but also begin to identify methods of cleaning the metal underneath as well as saving the plastic so important to the context of the piece.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Ma

Emily Ma

Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Co-Authors
avatar for Ellen Cunningham-Kruppa

Ellen Cunningham-Kruppa

Assoc. Director for Preservation and Conservation, Harry Ransom Center
Ellen Cunningham-Kruppa has been an active practitioner, educator and consultant in the field of cultural heritage preservation for 35 years. From 1985 to 1987 she was project archivist (supported by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission) at The Johns Hopkins... Read More →
avatar for Olivia Primanis

Olivia Primanis

Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center
Olivia Primanis is the Senior Book Conservator at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, where she performs conservation treatments and manages the book lab and special projects. She is interested in general conservation and preservation subjects relating to library and museum... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

35. (Research and Technical Studies) Optimizing Paint Cross-Section Preparation for Modern and Contemporary Art: A Case Study
Big Egg (1968) by Ed Clark is a large oval-shaped abstract painting on canvas, created while the artist was working in France. The painting is from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) collection and underwent technical study and conservation at the Museum Conservation Institute (MCI). Clark is known for his technique of painting with the canvas on the floor, pouring and splashing many thin layers of paint and pushing them around with a large broom. Much of the paint surface has a matte and chalky appearance. Big Egg was originally thought to be acrylic, but preliminary analysis showed the underlying paint layers to be water sensitive and the pigments to be bound in polyvinylacrylate (PVAc) with a possible ethylene co-polymer. Currently, the painting is on view at the Visual Art Gallery at NMAAHC. This study is a continuation of research conducted in 2015-2016 on un-embedded paint samples from Big Egg with ATR-FTIR and Hirox microscopy. In this study, a paint cross-section embedding and polishing technique was developed to further the binder and pigment analysis of each paint layer with FTIR chemical mapping and SEM-EDX. This research is part of broader investigations by the authors with the goal to optimize paint sample preparation for modern and contemporary art. The paint cross-section methodology is as follows: 1) embed the paint sample in Bio-Plastic® 2) mount the embedded sample on double-sided silicon tape onto a glass slide 3) place the paint layers parallel to the glass slide 4) ensure strata of paint is fully on view when the sample is released from the mold 5) use metal tube as mold, ¾” in diameter cut to ¾” height 6) coat the interior of the mold with silicon grease 7) a negligible amount of resin exists between the paint sample and silicone tape resulting in minimal polishing 8) dry polish with MicroMesh 8) use Hirox reflective bright field to confirm paint sample surface topography. The analysis of the paint cross-sections starts from the least invasive technique, ending with the more invasive method—from Hirox microscope examination to FTIR mapping (measured in reflectance mode) to SEM-EDX. Using the methodology listed above, a paint cross- from Big Egg was analyzed and 13 layers of paint were observed. The thickness, inorganic elements, and binder of each stratum was examined by FTIR mapping and SEM-EDX. Water-sensitive PVAc paint in Big Egg was confirmed by ATR-FTIR on non-embedded paint and FTIR mapping of the embedded paint cross-section. This result supports the treatment selection of water-based consolidant, water-based inpainting material, and the choice of Beva film as a lining adhesive. Fully polished paint cross-sections ready for analysis can be prepared within a day. The application has been extended to include egg tempera paint, photographs, and polychrome. This cross-section preparation expands the instrumental analysis capability from one paint sample, maximizing the information gathered. Future work includes more comparative experiments with ion milling systems to improve the paint surface quality and further organic material analysis with FTIR-mapping.

Speakers
avatar for Jia-sun Tsang

Jia-sun Tsang

Senior Paintings Conservator, Museum Conservation Institute
Jia-sun Tsang is senior paintings conservator at the MCI, where she conserves paintings for Smithsonian museums. She holds an M.Sc. from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and an M.Sc. in chemistry from Bowling Green State University, OH. Since 2007... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Stephanie Barnes

Stephanie Barnes

Conservator of Paintings, Barnes
Stephanie Barnes is a graduate of the Queen's University Master in Art Conservation program where she specialized in the conservation of paintings. She also holds a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Mount Allison University and an M.Sc. in Chemistry from Laval University. Stephanie recently... Read More →
avatar for Elle D Friedberg

Elle D Friedberg

Pre-Program Intern, Worcester Art Museum
Elle Friedberg is the Pre-Program Intern at the Worcester Art Museum in Worcester, MA. Previously, she has held internships at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute, National Gallery of Art, and Smithsonian National Museum of American History in the greater DC area. Friedberg... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Lam

Thomas Lam

conservation scientist, Smithsonian Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University. After his PhD, Thomas completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Thomas is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledge... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

36. (Collection Care) Fire Hazard of Traditional Potteries with Polyester Overlay Plywood
Fire poses one of the greatest threats to irreplaceable cultural heritage. While ensuring human safety is of uttermost importance, fire and rescue departments and cultural heritage institutions have also endeavored to understand the impact that museum fire has on the exhibits. So far, a list of possible risk factors has been drawn, but no empirical analysis has ever been carried out on any of the factors. As different materials react to the changes of temperature and humidity differently, this paper selects pottery, a commonly seen material, for our examination. We will first identify the possible risk factors for the exhibits when museums catch fire. We then choose high-temperature and smoke as the research subject and conduct experiments on four types of Taiwanese traditional potteries (two types traditional Chinese handmade teapots, Zisha clay and Taiwan red-clay teapot) for tolerance testing. The possible complication that wooden exhibition cases may cause for the above-mentioned potteries is also considered. Based on the experiment results, this paper will make rescue priority suggestion for pottery type exhibits in museums. It is hoped that the research will make contributions for museums to make fire safety and evacuation plan, and preventive conservation in the future.

Speakers
MT

Mei Tu

Research & Collection Department Assistant, Tainan Art Museum (TAM)

Co-Authors
JH

Jay Hsieh

Professor, Department Of Materials Science And Engineering, National Taiwan University
PH

Patricia Huang

Assiant Proffesor, Department of Art & Design Design, National Taipei Education University

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

37. (Paintings) Archiving for the Museums Using the Ultra-High Resolution Scanning System
On May 18, 2015, the Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation (Tokyo, JAPAN) closed its doors in preparation for the construction of a new building, presenting us with a unique window of opportunity for performing ultra-high resolution scans of the museum’s most valuable paintings. The Ishibashi Foundation Collection includes more than 2,600 works of art. The core of the collection consists of 19th century Impressionist paintings from France, 20th century Western art, Japanese Western-style paintings, and so on. While the museum was closed to the public, an ultra-high resolution digital archiving project was undertaken for conservation of artworks and digital exhibitions. The museum chose to use scanners manufactured by Sabia Inc., developed at the Advanced Imaging Technology Laboratory of Kyoto University for its large-scale digitization project.  The Ultra-High resolution imaging is on the rise in the field of digital archiving of cultural heritage. Conventional commercially available systems are both time consuming and costly for museums and galleries. However, by using a high resolution scanner which is particularly designed to address the limitations of conventional techniques, we could reduce both time and cost significantly. We have brought the scanners to universities, museums, and temples around the world and has digitized thousands of works. The main feature of the scanner is its excellent portability, so it can be carried around to the site and the scanning time is very shorter compared to other available technologies. The scanner features a dual line camera head which can take simultaneous visible and near infrared images. This unique feature offers greatly reduced the acquisition time unlike conventional imaging techniques where these two types of images must be acquired separately. The light sources used were a visible LED and near infrared LED (~850nm spectral peak). The cameras were two line CCD cameras. One camera was filtered using a UV/IR cut filter while the other camera was filtered with an IR filter. At the Bridgestone museum scanning project, the scanning resolution was 1000dpi (~39 pixel/mm). There were over 100 oil paintings digitized belonging to the collection of Bridgestone Museum of Art at the Art Research Center in Tokyo and it only took around 10 days to acquire multiple types of ultrahigh resolution images which include symmetrically-lit visible images, specularly-lit visible light images and near. In this Bridgestone Museum project, these paintings represent the best of the best in their collection. The paintings vary in sizes the largest of which is around 2 x 2 m. In this paper, we present the result of our scanning and share some insights on how to do a large-scale ultrahigh resolution digitization projects within a practical budget and time limit. Our more than 10 years of experience in digitizing large objects would be of interest to the museum community who are planning to do a similar project. We would also share how we can use these ultrahigh resolution images for studying the material and techniques used in the artworks for conservation and preservation efforts.

Speakers
YS

Yasuhide Shimbata

Curator, Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation
JA

Jay Arre Toque

CTO, Sabia Inc
Dr. Jay Arre Toque is currently the Chief Technical Officer of Sabia Inc. He has doctoral degree from the Graduate School of Engineering at Kyoto University, specializing in developing high-resolution analytical imaging technology. He was a JSPS postdoctoral fellow for two years before... Read More →

Co-Authors
AI

Ari Ide-Ektessabi

Professor, Kyoto University
To follow
RM

Ryota Magara

Researcher, Sabia, Inc
KO

Koji Okumura

CEO, Sabia Inc
To follow
MT

Masahiro Toiya

Director, Sabia Inc
To follow

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

38. (Book and Paper) You’re Printing What? Where? The material stability and safety of 3D printing thermoplastic polymers for fused filament fabrication.
The rapid growth and adoption of 3D printing technologies has or will soon bring a new generation of printed polymer objects into our collections. With almost half a million printers shipped in 2016 alone, 3D printed objects are likely to stay with us for as long as the polymers last. While 3D printing encompasses a variety of distinct processes, fused filament fabrication (FFF) is the most popular and accessible 3D printing technology, utilizing a heated nozzle head to deposit layers of polymer into a computer generated design. FFF is widely used in museums, arts, and educational settings as a low-cost teaching tool. At the University of Florida (UF), we have printed exhibit mounts, archaeological replicas for classroom use, and prosthetics for a children’s charity. Despite the widespread adoption of FFF technology, little testing has been done to either understand the stability of the thermoplastic polymers used in these printers or potential health ramifications of bringing industrial production methods to a desktop printer. To better understand the long-term stability of the variety of polymers compatible with the 3D printers at UF, the UF Libraries are undertaking Oddy testing and Photographic Activity Testing on the commercially available polymers to understand their long-term stability for possible use in collection storage and display. In parallel with the material testing, we will be measuring the emission of ultrafine particles (UFPs) during the printing process. UFPs and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) impact indoor air quality and may be a potential health risk to users. The results of this testing will help conservators make key materials decisions for the health and safety of our collections and our creators. Materials testing will provide insights to potential hazards entering collections as well as potential tools for use in creating custom housings and exhibit mounts. Understanding the emission of UFPs during printing can help guide room and ventilation design to minimize potential health risks to conservators, artists, and other makers.

Speakers
avatar for Fletcher B. Durant

Fletcher B. Durant

Librarian (Preservation), Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Fletcher Durant is the Preservation Librarian at the University of Florida Smathers Libraries. His work focuses on the preventive conservation of library and archival materials, the sustainability of cultural heritage, and risk management. He is a trained book and paper conservator... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Neelam Bharti

Neelam Bharti

Chemistry Librarian, Marston Science Library at the University of Florida
Neelam Bharti is the Chemistry Librarian at Marston Science Library at the University of Florida. She has her PhD in Chemistry from Jamia Millia Tslamia.

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

39. (Archaeological Conservation) Stone-panelled red lacquer wooden table excavated from King Lu’s tomb of Ming Dynasty and its lacquer technique study
The earliest-known Chinese lacquerware is a wooden bowl dating back to 7000 years ago, the era of Neolithic, which lacquer was regarded as waterproof function with decorating fine objects artistically. With the development of sophisticated lacquer process for thousands of years, the manufacture of lacquerware during Ming Dynasty have reached the summit in art and techniques, favoured by the privileged class as which is symbolic of social status, power and wealth. The tenth son of the first emperor (ZHU Yuanzhang) of Ming dynasty, ZHU Tan (1370-1389AD) , King Lu, whose tomb was found in Mt. Jiulong at Zoucheng, Shandong Province. More than 1100 funerary objects, including guard of honour figurines, lacquerwares, costumes, and furniture have been excavated and have provided precious material for further study of the ritual system together with clothing and furniture styles, of early Ming Dynasty. It has also revealed that the lacquerwares of Ming Dynasty have transformed functional usage of earlier period into ornamental purpose like for household exhibition. In order to better understand the lacquer craft of the stone-panelled red lacquer wooden table (see Fig. 1) in the past and restore and preserve this valuable artefact particularly the lacquered-wooden part with appropriate treatment, scientific exploration has been conducted before and during the conservation process. SEM-EDAX, XRD and FT-IR are main methodologies were applied to investigate fallen fragments of the red lacquer wooden table. The cross sectional analysis of the lacquer sample elucidated that, apart from the substrate, is composed of three layers, e.g. ground layer, finish layer, and surface layer (red lacquer film layer). Characterisation of lacquer film has shown that raw Chinese lacquer and cinnabar (HgS) added as the pigment, were mixed for the manufacture technique. Structure of polysaccharides has also been detected via IR and further analysis has suggested the support layer is made of fibres which might be derived from hemp. The fibre netting is believed to strengthen the whole furniture purpose, as well as increase the porosity of the item for gripping more layers of lacquer. Infrared spectrum has also indicated that tung-oil, a popular additives for manufacture lacquerwares during that time, was missing, not added during the lacquer-making process. Elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction suggested that quartz (SiO2) were added, and the well-rounded quartz particles showed they might have been artificially ground and then added into the lacquer as a filling to increase the hardness. Historical documents may not be able to fully explain the initiative in technical evolvement of the lacquerwares and how aesthetic taste of that time influenced and reformed the lacquerware’s manufacture process and artistry; nevertheless cultural objects would provide nuggets of information to unlock the past, how lacquerwares had been juxtaposed with contemporary architecture, furniture and furnishings to reach a visual harmony and ideal. Less practical and prone to decorative, may reflect social and economic development and state of that era.

Speakers
JW

Jianlan Wang

Lecturer, Shanghai Institute of Visual Arts
Jianlan Wang is currently teaching and doing research in Shanghai, China, after completing her PhD study in chemistry and conservation at Queen's University Belfast, UK. Her research interest is in archaeology /conservation and scientific analysis of objects and textiles.

Co-Authors
YW

Yunpeng Wang

deputy director of department of modern analysis, Shandong cultural relics protection and restoration center
Yunpeng Wang graduated in 2007 from School of physics in Shandong University, with a bachelor degree. In 2017 he has got master degree in School of materials science and engineering in Shandong University. Now he is deputy director of department of modern analysis of Shandong cultural... Read More →
JX

Junping Xu

Director of department of object conservation
Junping Xu has graduated from Northwestern University with Bachelor degree of Science in conservation technology in 2003. From July 2003 to December 2015, he engaged in the protection of cultural relics in the Museum of Shandong. From January 2016 to now, he has been engaged in the... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

40. (Book and Paper) Extraction and Analysis of DNA from Renaissance-Style Prepared Paper
Our overall goal is to test the hypothesis that biological material, including ancient DNA, can be extracted from 500-plus-year-old Renaissance artworks such as written folios and metalpoint drawings. We report here the preliminary results of a multidisciplinary technical and scientific research study where samples of modern “prepared” paper were analyzed. An IRB-approved human subjects protocol was initiated to allow us to collect saliva samples. The saliva samples were then used to fabricate prepared paper samples according to Cennini’s original description of methods (Broecke, L., “Cennino Cennini’s Il Libro dell’Arte: A New English Translation and Commentary with Italian Transcription”, London: Archetype Publications, Ltd., 2015). We then developed techniques to extract DNA from homogeneous samples of the prepared paper. Using real-time quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction, RT q-PCR), we measured the sensitivity of the extraction methods and determined whether the DNA that can be extracted is suitable for DNA sequencing. We determined that DNA from the cells in human saliva used to prepare paper could be extracted quantitatively from various paper types, and that the DNA can be amplified and detected using RT q-PCR. From a 1.2-mm “punch biopsy” we achieved the theoretical detection limit of 6 picograms of DNA, which corresponds to the amount of DNA in one human epithelial cell. On average, the DNA yield from a punch biopsy from the prepared paper is the equivalent of about 7 cells. We have begun to test aged specimens and will further study the inhibitory effects of metalpoint media, paints, resins, glues, waxes, etc. to human DNA testing. We will also employ single-cell Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) in order to obtain genomes from DNA extracted from the paper samples. In summary, we report preliminary results that provide a basis for developing a minimally-invasive method to analyze artworks, such as drawings on Renaissance-prepared paper. The methods we develop are applicable to studies of authentic artworks and paper documents from various periods. Conservation scientists using UV, XRF and X-ray technologies to study artworks should consider that under certain conditions, UV light and X-rays damage DNA, thereby forever removing the possibility of extracting artists’ DNA and other biological information from works on paper or other substrates.

Speakers
avatar for Manija Kazmi

Manija Kazmi

Research Specialist, Rockefeller University
Manija A. Kazmi, M.S. is a research specialist in the Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Signal Transduction at the Rockefeller University in New York. She received her M.S. in molecular biology from New York University and has extensive experience in molecular cloning and recombinant... Read More →
avatar for Thomas P. Sakmar

Thomas P. Sakmar

Richard M. & Isabel P. Furlaud Professor, Rockefeller University
Thomas P. Sakmar, M.D. is a physician-scientist and the Richard M. & Isabel P. Furlaud Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Signal Transduction at The Rockefeller University in New York. He is also a guest professor at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr... Read More →
avatar for Karina C. Åberg

Karina C. Åberg

Artist-in-Residence/Guest Investigator, Rockefeller University
Karina Åberg is a member of The Leonardo da Vinci DNA Project and currently artist-in-residence at The Rockefeller University in New York. In 1988 she received her bachelor of fine arts (BFA) degree in illustration from the School of Visual Arts (SVA) in New York. In 1991 she received... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Thomas Huber

Thomas Huber

Research Assistant Professor, Rockefeller University
Thomas Huber, M.D., Ph.D. is a faculty member at the Rockefeller University in New York where he studies chemical and molecular biology of G protein-coupled receptors, an important cell surface protein that serves as a drug target for up to one-third of therapeutic medicines. He was... Read More →
avatar for Rhonda K. Roby

Rhonda K. Roby

Guest Investigator, Rockefeller University
Rhonda K. Roby, Ph.D., M.P.H. is a forensics geneticist with a special interest in DNA detection technology. She received an A.B. in Biology and French from Washington University in St. Louis, an M.P.H. from University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. in genetics from Universidad... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

41. (Book and Paper) Rising from the ashes : The conservation and treatment of paper support objects with large loss and burn
Burn is not a common deterioration in the cultural relics of paper base. Burn may be from the process of material made or the bad collection environment, like the mounting or storage made by the bad materials. “Mazu” journal's first issue collects by National Museum of Taiwan Literature, has a large part loss and burn on the book cover and pages, there is over half of the book cover missing that the item is so weak and unstable. Since this object is one evident of special regime conversion in Taiwan, it’s very important in cultural change, the history of literature and book binding. Therefore, this paper will use present digital printing out technology to restore this important journal, and will make contribution for the condition and consider treatment of the burned object. “Mazu” is a Japanese journal published during the period which Japan colonial Taiwan. ”Mazu”, the name of journal, is the goddess of the sea from the Taiwan traditional belief, and the content of journals is the poems and novels all surrounded by this theme. The magazines are hand binding by the editor, Mitsuru Nishikawa, due to his personal hobby for beauty of the binding and limited book, and publishing for those who collect books. It’s also the first one literature magazine which is combined of literature with art and printing technology. The illustrations of book are the print works all about Taiwanese folk and religious themes, and the pages are Asia handmade paper, on the endpaper stick a sheet of “paper money”, which used to be in the ceremony of Taiwan's Traditional Belie. “Paper money” base is made of straw fiber, and d decorate with gold leaf and red prints, and is incensed with fire to sacrifice to gods in East Asian traditional belief which is meaning for communicate with god and pray for blessings. In this journal, paper money is meaning the decoration of book ticket. The deterioration of this book is serious that the burn, brittle and lose the full cover and pages. The paper supports are dark brown color, and the water stain, tide line on the paper outward diffused from the spine as the center. It’s easily broken and peeling off since burn and brittle when doing the treatment, and that makes it extremely difficult during all the conservation treatment with the choice of treatment materials also have many considerations. At the same time this paper also the basic scientific analysis for burn part of the paper, and compensation large missing by using Asia mounting lining technique with inkjet printing out technology to maintain the texture of the cultural relics and visual continuity.

Speakers
avatar for Su-Yuan Cheng

Su-Yuan Cheng

paper conservator, National Museum of Taiwan Literature
Su-Yuan Cheng as a paper conservator at the National Museum of Taiwan Literature. She received a MA degree in paper conservation from Tainan National University of the Art in 2014. She obtained training in National Library of Australia and Germanisches National museum. Since 2015... Read More →
JJ

Jen Jung Ku

Senior Paper Conservator, National Museum of Taiwan Literature
Jen Jung Ku received a MA in paper conservation from the Tainan National University of the Arts Tainan National University of the Arts (2010). She undertook advanced internships and additional training at the George Eastman House and Library and Archives Canada .She is presently senior... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

42. (Architecture) Cooperation with different backgrounds for monument protection. How deep can we interfere with the monument?
A social initiative, connecting people of different professions, formed in order to save wooden monuments. The responsibilities are divided between the Departments of Wood Conservation and Architecture of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, and the Androlli Foundation. A team from Wood Conservation Department prepared the assessment of the technical condition of the monument. Another team from Architecture, attempted to save the original monuments' substance and proposed a new form of adaptation for the Wooden Villa. The enthusiasts of old wooden architecture from the Andriolli Foundation researched the history of the building and took care of the legal aspects. In other hand work on a historic wooden building forces on conservator to make detailed analysis and research of the conservation status of structural and decorative wooden elements. The conservation program must take into account the historical destiny of the building, but also the requirements of modern construction. It often involves the need to adapt it to new conditions. The paper presents also the problems that a conservator has to solve to preserve as much historical substance as possible in order to adapt to new needs and, above all, to take care of the safety of users of modern facilities. How deep he can ingere in historical susbtance to protect them? The aim of the presentation is to present our experiences of cooperation between different organizations focused on saving a wooden building and conservation dilemma which they met. The reflections are presented on the Gurewicz Pension located in the Otwock in Poland.

Speakers
avatar for Ewa Lisiecka

Ewa Lisiecka

Warsaw University of Life Sciences
AM

Agnieszka Mielnik

Warsaw University of Life Sciences
Wood passionist.


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

43. (Research and Technical Studies) Laying with Tiffany: Conservation of the Swan Memorial Glass Mosaic at Woodlawn Cemetery
The glass designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany and his studio were unparalleled in American art of the late 19th and early 20th century. Less known, but no less significant were the studio’s architectural mosaic and monument designs. Historians have begun to research commissions but much remains to be done on the original fabrication and conservation of this work. The Swan Monument was designed by Tiffany Studios and installed in Woodlawn Cemetery in 1914. The mosaic was commissioned from Tiffany by Helen M.W. Swan for her late husband Charles. The first phase of a conservation study on the monument documented current conditions, analyzed materials and fabrication, determined deterioration mechanisms, and identified potential conservation methods. The canopy style monument is ten feet tall and composed of Tiffany granite, a variegated pink granite quarried in Braintree, MA. A 2’8 ½” x 6’11” art-glass mosaic panel fills the central panel of the structure and is covered by a shallow portico. The scene is likely influenced by Pre-Raphaelite imagery and depicts an angel guiding a woman into a heavenly landscape. The composition is enhanced by the dramatic curvature of the angel’s wing and by the artisan’s usage of the firm’s infamous iridescent glass on both the angel and the idyllic countryside to emphasize their celestial quality. The memorial is unique among the large collection of Tiffany Studios’ works found in Woodlawn, in that its mosaic is open-air and readily visible to the public, and it is one of only a small number of extant memorials of its kind in the United States. The exposure of the mosaic contributes to its surface decay and the loss of many of the glass tesserae over the past century. Records from Woodlawn Cemetery indicate that the memorial began shedding glass and needed repair less than four years after installation. Over the years, some tesserae were recovered and replaced during repair campaigns while many others were lost. Consequently, the mosaic now has significant areas of loss and many areas of the remaining glass display corrosion and conchoidal spalling from prolonged contact with water and other damaging substances. XRD analysis determined that the original backing material was made of Keene’s cement, a gypsiferous, hard plaster, and was reinforced with metal bars. SEM and SEM-EDS were used to analyze the surface topography and chemical makeup of samples of degraded tesserae as well as to analyze the effect of a micro abrasive treatment to remove a thin layer of corroded glass from the tessera surface in an effort to expose the fully-saturated, colored glass underneath. Removal of this thin layer of color-leached silica on affected tesserae and re-coating with a protective layer of Acryloid B-72 returns the glass tesserae to their original appearance and protects their surfaces from future exposure. Conservation of the monument based on testing results is currently underway. The extant art glass is being stabilized, detached tesserae re-attached, and missing tesserae will be cut and replaced in-kind from donations of similar sheets of Tiffany glass when available.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Magill

Courtney Magill

Lab Manager, University of Pennsylvania
Courtney Magill is the lab manager for the Architectural Conservation Laboratory and a post-graduate fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She graduated from the University of Georgia with dual Bachelor of Arts degrees in art history and classical culture in 2011. Through her... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Frank Matero-[PA]

Frank Matero-[PA]

Professor of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania Architectural Conservation Laboratory
Frank G. Matero is Professor of Architecture and Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Director and founder of the Architectural Conservation Laboratory and a member of the Graduate Group in the Department... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

44. (Book and Paper) Bold Will Hold: Investigating Artist Materials of Classic American Tattoo Flash
This research will explore the materials and methods behind the creation of North American paper-based tattoo artifacts from the 19th and 20th centuries. As the folk art canon arguably includes tattoo ephemera, the conservation of these works on paper deserve attention for best practice based on materials, techniques and historical use. These objects include flash (the drawn and printed designs for tattoos), stencils and sketchbooks which intersect as industrial art during the time of their creation, to highly collectible artworks in and outside the tattoo community at present. Vintage flash sheet designs range from rudimentary to ornate in their execution. Although similar images depict ageless themes of love, life and loss, one flash sheet showcasing representations of heartbreak is not the same as another sheet of broken hearts. Artist materials used to create these objects vary widely and invite exploration. The paper objects surrounding the tattoo industry of the past, such as hand-painted business advertisements and flash sheets, were created using an assortment of materials that encompass different substrates, surface coatings, adhesives, pigments and dyes. Most frequently these objects were heavily handled, tacked directly to walls and pork-chopped, the process by which specific designs were cut to be collaged with others on a single sheet. Due to their environment of constant use by artists in stationary shops or more itinerant set-ups, physical damage is common. Signs of structural and cosmetic degradation include water damage, nicotine stains, aged varnishes, paper loss and media disturbances. As a conservator who treats these objects, I have observed that tattoo historians and tattoo history collectors can have different conservation goals. To inform a treatment course for these artworks, if any, it is necessary to compile more studied information regarding the materials and their original context. This project aims to gather and organize findings to build case studies by working directly with original materials. Non-destructive analysis using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) will be exercised. Sourcing archival materials in addition to interviewing current practitioners of this art form will help support a continued dialogue that can help acquaint other conservation professionals to preserving these historical artworks.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Moeller

Laura Moeller

Conservator, Strange Stock Art Conservation
For the past decade, Laura has been treating paper and photographic materials for some of the largest museum and private conservation labs in the country. Laura is an alumna of the Museum Studies Graduate School at George Washington University and holds additional degrees in photography... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

45. (Archaeological Conservation) The two layers technique for supporting and assembling severely damaged composed sandals of King Tutankhamun
This study discusses the conservation of a pair of composed sandals of king Tutankhamun which considered unique and one of the kind, made of three principle materials; leather, gold and papyrus. some conservation treatments were applied on the sandals at the discovery process in 1922 which caused rigidity, fragmentation and darkness in the leather, buckling in the golden belts that surround the base, golden ornaments felt of the sandals as a result the sandals were categorized as a material for study and not for exhibition. a full documentation study was applied by digital photography and Auto-Cad program for making deterioration map for the sandals. Some microbiological test swaps were taken to test the sandals beside some investigations and analysis were executed; FTIR for identifying previous conservation materials and XRF for recognizing the metal type used in manufacturing of the sandals. Then several steps of conservation were applied; mechanical cleaning and consolidation for each piece of fragment. In order to prevent any possible new damage for the fragments the reassembling of the fragments was tried first by Photoshop before the actual procedure as each pair of matched fragments were signed with special symbol, the pieces then were adhered by Klucel G and support of Japanese paper. The Japanese paper was died first with a natural black dye to make the support suitable in color with the sandals but still can be recognized. A second layer of acid free cardboard was used to support the sandals from the bottom without adding adhesive. The conservation treatments extended the lifetime of the sandals and stabilized their condition. For the correct dealing and handling of the previous sandals, a plexi glass holder was designed as a final step.

Speakers
SM

Safwat Mohammed

Head Assistant of Organic Material Lab, Grand Egyptian Museum
Safwat Mohamed graduated from Cairo University, Faculty of Archaeology and Conservation Department in 2001.  He got his master degree in Heritage Conservation and Site Management, a joint master between Helwan University in Egypt and BTU in Germany. He has been working  in the conservation... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

48. (Architecture) Steam Heat: Use of high heat/ low pressure cleaning system on 19th century funerary monuments at Green-Wood Cemetery
During the spring of 2016 Green-Wood Cemetery and the Kärcher company began a collaboration under the company's cultural heritage program. Kärcher is a leader in the European pressure washer and steam cleaning world, this project was their first in the United States. Two mausoleums and one large monument were chosen for cleaning. All monuments were white american marble, most likely from the east coast. All exhibited deterioration and soiling due to biological growth, gypsum crust build up and lack of routine maintenance. After small tests were completed in March of 2016 Kärcher teamed up with Green-Wood to complete all the cleanings in May of 2016. The cleanings took approximately seven days. The steam machine was originally formulated to clean large engines and other industrial components, however its gentle pressure and lack of chemicals makes it a unique conservation tool. Green-Wood was able to gain on site knowledge of the steam cleaning methods as well as low pressure abrasive techniques to continue the conservation efforts after Kärcher returned to Germany. This presentation will follow the Green-Wood restoration team and the Kärcher specialists through the conservation of the three monuments, describe the testing methods, best practices in the field, trouble shooting, and next steps.

Speakers
GS

Georg Shmid

Conservator, AeDis
Georg Shmid is a conservator with the firm AeDis in Germany. He assisted the Karcher team with the testing and treatment plans for the Green-Wood Cemetery project.
avatar for Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Manager of Restoration and Preservation, Green-Wood Cemetery
Neela K. Wickremesinghe joined the Green-Wood team during fall 2016. Ms. Wickremesinghe holds MS in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation.


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

50. (Book and Paper) Application of the Sewn Boards Binding for Field Books and Pocket Journals
The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA), and Smithsonian Institution Libraries have collaborated since 2010 on the Field Book Project, involving cataloging, preservation survey and assessment, conservation treatment, digitization and creation of an innovative crowd-sourced Transcription Center in order to make widely available our vulnerable, unique, scientific manuscript and other archival documentation held in a variety of contexts within our collections and research departments. The physical nature of field books at the Smithsonian varies widely in their size, media, format, and orientation over almost two centuries of scientific record keeping, making for a fascinating overview of structures (commercial and ad-hoc), styles, and secret surprises found in these sometimes intimate journals. Catalogers, collection managers, and volunteers from all over the world have reacted to and realized that these records, besides supporting original location evidence of a natural specimen collected, often hold much more unique contextual content. These include visual observations of color and behavior, hand-drawn maps, and notes on environmental conditions that may fill out missing data in the environmental record. Beyond their original purpose, the authors’ entries also reflect humanity via the occasional tasty recipe, remarks upon life in the field, and also bear witness to societal and political changes, the stresses of which sometimes become remarkably poignant through observable changes in handwriting and care taken in writing personal correspondence. This presentation will review guidelines and best practices that SIA has preferred for stabilizing, preparing, and conserving our original field books prior to and after digitization. Key to the core concept of connecting collections, special care is taken to identify and preserve in-situ inclusions (such as the eponymous moulted snakeskin) and other physical evidence that can be further linked to accessioned specimens. While low-tech minimal preservation actions can allow the collections manager to preserve these with a minimum of fuss, at times, the materiality of a field book can interfere with access, or cause great risk to the content, such that disbinding may be considered. Reversing vigorous prior interventions has been an especial challenge, where we advocate for the productive application of the sewn-boards binding as a useful tool in the archive and library conservator’s kit as an excellent option for conservation rebinding (see also (Natural History Collections) Smudges, snakeskins, and pins, oh my!).

Speakers
avatar for R William Bennett III

R William Bennett III

Conservator, Smithsonian Institution Archives
William Bennett is the Conservation Specialist for the Smithsonian Institution Archives. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University and the West Dean College graduate program in Book Conservation, and previously worked in Collections Care at the Library of Congress. He is an AIC... Read More →
avatar for Nora Lockshin-[PA]

Nora Lockshin-[PA]

Head, Preservation and Collections Care, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Nora Lockshin is Senior Paper Conservator for the Smithsonian Institution Archives’ Conservation Lab. She provides treatment, guidance, research, training and advocacy for caregivers of collections, including the Smithsonian Archives, its allied archival units and special collections... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

51. (Collection Care) An inexpensive and visually appealing solution to environmentally based distortions in limp vellum bindings
The Sutro Library is an important but neglected collection of ancient and modern materials which began as the personal collection of Adolph Sutro. In his life, he had intended to bestow upon the citizens of San Francisco a university level research library for their own edification. A populist by nature, he envisioned no special permissions or qualifications as being prerequisite to accessing the transformative powers of history, science, art, architecture, literature and languages. During his life he was unable to construct a building tfor his impressive collection, which at the time of his death was reputed to include the largest privately held collection of incunabula, First through Fourth Folios of William Shakespeare, Yemenite Hebrew scrolls, and expansive collections of English, American, German and Mexican pamphlets. During the dissolution of his estate his library, or what remained of it after having suffered significant loss in the 1906 earthquake and fire, was bequeathed to the California State Library. As a publicly accessible institution, this would ensure that no barriers to access would exist. An additional provision that the materials never be permanently housed outside the city limits of San Francisco would guarantee accessibility to the residents of the city which he loved and had so deeply impacted. Unfortunately, without an existing edifice in San Francisco that stipulation caused no end of difficulty for the State Library which is located about 90 miles away in the State Capital. The collection found temporary homes in four different locations during its first hundred years. As the precious offer of space which had been extended through the kindness of strangers would be rescinded, and a new location would have to be found again and again, a permanent location was finally found in 2012. The quality and suitability of temporary locations varied widely. From dirt floors in basements to damp temporary structures the collections have suffered tremendously due to poor storage conditions. Inappropriate shelving, inadequate housing and inconsistent environmental controls have resulted in distinct damage to many of the most important collections. One example is the effect of out-of-control relative humidity upon the Tlatelolco collection, which contains approximately 800 15th - 19th century volumes with the bulk of the 15th - 17th century imprints bound in vellum. Distortion is rampant. With the installation of a new Director this problem was prioritized. She identified the Tlatelolco collection as a source of both historical and visual importance for potential donors, and wanted a housing structure which would allow the limp vellum to be seen on the shelves. Due to the geographic distance between the materials and our Preservation department in Sacramento the work would need to be done on-site. Due to the number of items and low staffing the housing project would need to be completed with the help of student workers. Available funds for housing materials would be limited and the structure would need to be safe in accommodating various other types of damage such as torn covers. This poster will describe the proposed solution and workflow.

Speakers
CW

Colyn Wohlmut

Librarian, Sutro Library, California State Library
Colyn Wohlmut is a Librarian at the Sutro Library, California State Library. While working as a curatorial assistant at the Stanford University Libraries, she earned her MLIS from San José State University in 2009. Her active study of bookbinding inspired her to pursue a MA in Conservation... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

51. (Natural History) Putting the Monkey Back in the Classroom: the Conservation and Restoration of a Mounted Guenon Monkey
As mounted taxidermy specimens in natural history collections age, original components like fingers, toes, and hair, as well as areas sculpted by the taxidermist, may become damaged, aged, or lost. The deterioration often causes the specimen to be pushed to the back of the shelf, making it unfit for display or for educational activities. Such was the case for a mounted guenon monkey held in the Education Department at the American Museum of Natural History. The mounted guenon, a DeBrazza’s Monkey, had lost almost all of its characteristic white mustache and beard, several fingers had broken off, and the skin on its foot and ankle had torn in two locations. 

In order to conserve and restore the guenon monkey for the Education Department, tears in the skin were mended, lost facial hair was replaced, and the missing fingers were remade. This poster will describe three effective methods of restoration used to revitalize this mounted guenon monkey: flocking hair, casting pigmented wax fills for finger replacement, and techniques for mending torn skin with different adhesives.

Speakers
avatar for Joy Bloser

Joy Bloser

Graduate Intern at The Museum of Modern Art, The Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
Joy Bloser is the Marica and Jan Vilcek Fellow in Art Conservation at The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, earning her dual MS/MA in the Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works and History of Art & Archaeology. She specializes in modern and contemporary objects... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Julia	Sybalsky

Julia Sybalsky

Senior Associate Conservator, American Museum of Natural History
Julia Sybalsky is an Associate Conservator at the AMNH, where she began working in January of 2010. She was an important contributor in the recently-completed renovation of dioramas in the Hall of North American Mammals and the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall. Julia's work supports... Read More →
avatar for Fran E. Ritchie

Fran E. Ritchie

Conservator, Harpers Ferry Center
Fran Ritchie is the Conservator of ethnographic materials, natural science, and decorative arts objects at the National Park Service (NPS) Harpers Ferry Center. Prior to working for the NPS, she was an assistant conservator in the Anthropology Objects Conservation Lab at the American... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballroom (Foyer outside Ballrooms - Poster Session) Marriott Marquis Houston
 
Saturday, June 2
 

10:00am

Poster Lightning Round
The Emerging Conservation Professionals Network (ECPN) is excited to host our second Poster Session Lightning Round! This fun and informal event will highlight the contributions of emerging conservation professionals to the Annual Meeting Poster Session. Selected participants will each give a very short presentation—essentially an "elevator pitch”—on their poster topic and have an opportunity to field questions from colleagues. The posters featured during the Lightning Round represent a wide range of specializations, types of collections, and areas of scientific research. Conference attendees at any career stage are welcome and encouraged to attend this event! 

The posters featured during the Lightning Round represent a wide range of specializations, types of collections, and areas of research. Join us to hear authors discuss the conservation treatments of unusual objects including an early edition Barbie, a theatrical makeup kit, and a board game with iron corrosion. Attendees will gain insight into the safety and logistical challenges presented by objects previously treated with heavy metals, as well as the communication challenges encountered as an architectural conservator building rapport with specialists in related professions. Come learn about the effects of climate change on submerged wooden artifacts and material characterization techniques, such as the information provided by SEM-EDS on the composition and manufacture of metal threads. Novel gel-based methods of treating electroplated silver and iron gall ink corrosion will also be presented.

Please see the below list for the full roster of posters to be discussed during the Lightning Round:
To conclude the event, we will also be providing the opportunity, time permitting, for poster authors and event attendees to get to know one another, network, and brainstorm future events and resources they would like to see ECPN pursue.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Gridley

Rebecca Gridley

Assistant Conservator, Objects Conservation Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Rebecca holds a BA in Art History from Yale University, and an MS in Conservation and MA in Art History & Archaeology from the Conservation Center, The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. She is currently an Assistant Conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan... Read More →
avatar for Kari Rayner

Kari Rayner

Conservator, National Gallery of Art
Kari Rayner is a graduate of the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU with a specialization in paintings conservation. She is currently in the position of post-graduate intern at the Hamilton Kerr Institute at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. Kari completed... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Association of North American Graduate Programs in Conservation (ANAGPIC)

Association of North American Graduate Programs in Conservation (ANAGPIC)

ANAGPIC was founded in May 1984 by the following organizations:Buffalo State College, State University of New York, Art Conservation Department;Harvard University Art Museums, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies;New York University, Conservation Center, Institute... Read More →


Saturday June 2, 2018 10:00am - 12:00pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston