Loading…
Attending this event?

View analytic

Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Tuesday, May 29
 

8:30am

Oddy Testing: Protocols and Practicalities
Limited Capacity full

In the 45 years since the first publication of the Oddy test by Andrew Oddy of the British Museum there has been a proliferation of methods used to perform this accelerated ageing test. A recent survey of institutions performing the test and a review of testing protocols on AIC’s wiki platform reveal over 20 distinct protocols. The variability of testing procedures as well as subjectivity of the results are well known issues in the field. Nevertheless, the test remains the prevalent method for evaluating exhibit, storage and packing material due to its low-cost, and easy implementation. The instructors will share their research examining the implications of various testing procedures and participants will have the chance to discuss methodologies with the goal of building consensus around a common protocol. Participants will gain hands-on experience in setting up the test properly as well as learn best practices for documenting and analyzing results. Types of additional analysis (e.g. gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), ion chromatography (IC), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy) that can aid in more fully understanding the test’s results will be discussed. This workshop is appropriate for those who are currently conducting tests for their institution, as well as those who would like to begin, either in a museum or private practice. Tips on how to record results in a format for easy upload to the AIC Wiki or CAMEO will be given. Participants who have results to share will have the opportunity to add their data on site with the assistance of AIC wiki editors. It is suggested that participants bring a laptop if possible.

Moderators
avatar for Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Partner, A.M. Art Conservation
Rachael Perkins Arenstein is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation and a Partner is A.M. Art Conservation, LLC the private practice that she co-founded in 2009. For more on A.M. Art Conservation please visit www.amartconservation.com. She has... Read More →

Instructors
avatar for Colleen Snyder-[PA]

Colleen Snyder-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects, The Cleveland Museum of Art
Colleen Snyder is currently Associate Conservator of Objects at The Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA), where she has worked for over 7 years. Colleen began in the middle of the museum’s extensive renovation project, which was completed in 2013, and has participated in the treatment... Read More →
avatar for Elena Torok

Elena Torok

Project Conservator, Yale University Art Gallery
Elena Torok is a project conservator at the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG), where she is assisting with a large-scale storage move of 35,000 objects to YUAG's new Margaret and Angus Wurtele Collection Studies Center at Yale's West Campus. She earned her M.S. from the Winterth... Read More →
avatar for Eric Breitung

Eric Breitung

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eric Breitung, Research Scientist, specializes in modern preservation materials and museum environment issues in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Scientific Research. His work includes the development of advanced analytical test methods for assessing commercial ma... Read More →
avatar for Michele Derrick-[Fellow]

Michele Derrick-[Fellow]

Schorr Family Associate Research Scientist, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Michele R. Derrick is a chemist and conservation scientist with more than twenty years’ experience analyzing and characterizing materials. She worked at the University of Arizona Analytical Center and then for twelve years as a conservation scientist at the Getty Conservat... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Owens

Samantha Owens

Glenstone
avatar for Samantha Springer-[PA]

Samantha Springer-[PA]

Conservator, Portland Art Museum
Samantha Springer relocated to Portland, Oregon in 2015 to take the position of Conservator at the Portland Art Museum. While Samantha remains a generalist due to her responsibility for care of a broad collection, she has particular interest in preventive conservation, sustainabi... Read More →



Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Pre-session Symposium) The Current Use of Leather in Book Conservation
Limited Capacity seats available

Leather has long been used as a repair material for damaged leather bindings. The working properties of historic leathers can be very different than modern ones. In recent years, conservators have begun to employ other materials, such as paper or cast acrylic, as an alternative to leather in book conservation treatments. Tanned animal skins offer less long-term stability and may be more difficult to prepare than other materials, but may also provide better strength and flexibility in a functioning book. Should conservators continue to employ leather using traditional book repair techniques on leather bindings? Should we abandon the use of tanned skins in favor of more chemically stable materials? Do alternative book repair materials really stand up to the mechanical stresses of use? Be part of the debate and register for the symposium.
  • Here is a brief sampling of the talks:

    A virtual tour of J Hewit & Sons – discover how bookbinding leathers are produced.
  • An exploration of over 50 years of book conservation at the Boston Athenæum. 
  • A comparison of the use of customized acrylic cast into reusable silicone molds as an alternative to traditional methods
  • An examination of SINTEVA Cuir as an alternative to leather
  • A study of the applications of Japanese papers as a leather replacement
  • An evaluation of the characteristics of bindings suitable for repair using tanned leather and a summary of the training needed to execute these repairs and an exploration of the suitability of cosmetic treatments that may alter the appearance of a historic binding.
  • A panel discussion of the Library of Congress’s treatment protocols and case studies of when traditional leather or other materials were used.
  • A report on the leather discussion group’s study on why modern leather deteriorates faster than older leather 
  • Lunch is included 


Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

Hands-On Lithography for Conservators
Limited Capacity filling up

Lithography is a complex, chemical printmaking process that requires firsthand experience to fully grasp the technique and potential artistic applications. This workshop introduces conservators to various lithographic processes and techniques commonly utilized by artists and studios, historically and up to this day. The curriculum consists primarily of hands-on printing activities but will also include lectures and group discussions. A comprehensive resource binder will be assembled by the participants throughout the workshop from a combination of lecture slides, notes, printing materials (plates and prints), and other useful references. This will allow participants to walk away with a strong understanding of the technique and have invaluable resources at their fingertips when returning to work.

Transportation will be provided from the Marriot Marquis Houston each morning and back to the Marriot Marquis Houston following the workshop each evening. The bus will depart from the Marriot at 8:15am.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Taylor

Christina Taylor

Assistant Paper Conservator, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies/Harvard Art Museums
Christina Taylor is the Assistant Paper Conservator at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies/Harvard Art Museums. She is a graduate of SUNY Buffalo State where she earned her MA in Art Conservation in 2015. She has held positions at the Museum of Fine Arts, Hou... Read More →

Instructors
CW

Christopher Wallace

Artist/Lithographer/Educator
Christopher Wallace is an artist, lithographer and educator based in Cambridge, MA. He received his MFA in printmaking from the University of North Texas in 2013, and his BFA in printmaking from the Kansas City Art Institute in 2010. He has held teaching positions at the Universi... Read More →



Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:30am - Wednesday May 30, 2018 4:30pm
Burning Bones Press 1518 Yale Street, Houston, TX 77008

9:00am

Introduction to Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)
Limited Capacity full

Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), a computational photography technique, is a portable, low-cost imaging method used to create high-quality digital representations of an object’s surface. Using a basic digital photography setup, images are captured and then interactively re-lit and enhanced through open source software. Invented by Hewlett-Packard Labs and further developed by the nonprofit corporation Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI), RTI has been applied by conservators to document and analyze tool marks and other evidence of manufacture and use; to clarify and record inscriptions; to accurately record surface condition; and to qualitatively assess surface change
over time.

Attendees will complete the course with all the fundamental materials needed to conduct highlight-based RTI in their studios with their own photography equipment, including written guides to both capture and processing, software and one set of 1" reflective spheres.

This course is intended for individuals with at least a general understanding of digital photography and digital image processing; they are not required to have previous experience with RTI, but are encouraged to review examples and background through the CHI website prior to attending.

Members of AIC's Conservators in Private Practice Group can register at the discounted price of $210.

Speakers
avatar for Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Objects Conservator, The Found Object Art Conservation
Kerith Koss Schrager is an Objects Conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation. She has worked with institutions such as Historic Hudson Valley, Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Freer|Sackler Galleries (Smithsonian Institution), Field Museum, and Shelbu... Read More →

Instructors
avatar for Anna Serotta-[PA]

Anna Serotta-[PA]

Assistant Conservator, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Objects Conservation
Anna Serotta is an Assistant Conservator in Objects Conservation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she is primarily responsible for the Egyptian Art collection. She received her Master’s Degree in Art History and an Advanced Certificate in Art Conservation at the In... Read More →

Sponsors

Tuesday May 29, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Fiber Identification and Analysis
Limited Capacity filling up

This workshop covers basic polarized light microscopy (PLM) and methods of sampling, characterization and identification mammalian hair and selected natural and synthetic fibers. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises involving sample preparation and specimen manipulation as well as the characterization and identification of real life specimens.

Instructors
avatar for Nicholas Petraco

Nicholas Petraco

Nicholas Petraco Sr., BS Analytical Chemistry, MS Forensic Science, very extensive post-degree university coursework in art, art history and heritage conservation, Fellow of New York Microscopical Society (NYMS), Fellow of American Academy of Forensic Science, Diplomat of the Ame... Read More →

Sponsors

Tuesday May 29, 2018 9:00am - Wednesday May 30, 2018 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Varnishing in the 21st Century
Limited Capacity full

The introduction of new synthetic low molecular weight (LMW) resins by René de la Rie in the early 1990's, subsequent developments in the field, and discontinued solvents and resins have led to changes in the varnishes available to conservators. Through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and practical sessions, this workshop is designed for paintings conservators seeking to bring their knowledge of varnishes up to date.

Participants will gain knowledge in the characteristics of available, stable resins and solvents and how to evaluate their properties. A conservator's choices will affect the appearance and aging properties of cultural materials in their care. A short reading list will be sent in advance.

Transportation will be provided from the Marriot Marquis Houston each morning and back to the Marriot Marquis Houston following the workshop each evening. The bus will depart from the Marriot at 8:15am.

Instructors
avatar for Jill Whitten-[PA]

Jill Whitten-[PA]

Co-Director/Painting Conservator, Whitten & Proctor Fine Art Conservation
Jill Whitten received a BFA in Painting from the University of Texas at Austin, and an MA and Certificate of Conservation from Buffalo State College, New York, in 1992. Her work in the field of art conservation includes a collaboration with the National Gallery of Art and the J.P... Read More →
avatar for Robert Proctor-[PA]

Robert Proctor-[PA]

Co-Director, Whitten & Proctor Fine Art Conservation
Robert G. Proctor Jr. is a painting conservator in Houston, Texas. He has worked on numerous public murals and has developed a variety of structural techniques for minimal intervention. He teaches about varnishes and thread-by-thread tear re-weaving at U.S. conservation programs... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 9:00am - Wednesday May 30, 2018 5:30pm
Menil Collection

11:00am

Department Head Luncheon and Tips Session
Limited Capacity full

A moderated discussion followed by lunch for the heads of conservation and conservation science departments. Participants will be asked to share effective ways they have demonstrated leadership in fundraising, creating staff positions and increasing diversity in the field. This session will be followed by the Communicating Values and Effecting Change workshop, during which additional participants interested in advancing conservation leadership (but are not currently department heads) will join the discussion. Participants of this luncheon are expected to register for the Communicating Values and Effecting Change workshop as well.

Moderators
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also esta... Read More →
avatar for Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna was recently the Chief of Conservation at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a position she held since in 2011. Previously, Tiarna worked for nine years as a paintings conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. She holds a bachelor’s degree in both chemist... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Associate Director/Conservator, Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Sanchita Balachandran is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She teaches courses related to the technical study and analysis of ancient objects, a... Read More →
avatar for Jeanne Marie Teutonico

Jeanne Marie Teutonico

Associate Director, Programs, Getty Conservation Institute
Jeanne Marie Teutonico is associate director of Programs at the GCI where her responsibilities include managing the Buildings and Sites, Collections, and Science departments, oversight of GCI publications, and the establishment of strategic priorities for the Institute's programm... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 11:00am - 1:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

1:00pm

Museum of Fine Arts Houston Collections Storage Tour
Limited Capacity full

Join us for a special tour of the MFSH collection storage. Timing and cost TBD

Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
MFAH

1:00pm

Persistence and Change: Leadership Techniques for Both
Limited Capacity seats available

Imagine that you were able to identify individuals who were open to change, and those that were more likely to dig in their heels to protect the status quo.  Perhaps even more importantly, what difference would it make if you could, through situation framing, communication and incentives, shift people from the latter category to the former?  This session aims to give participants that capacity.  The foundation of the session is in recent research from the Motivational Science Center at Columbia (and elsewhere) that identifies individual dispositions to persistence and change, and the interventions that can increase either tendency.  Approaches to change within museums will be reviewed using a case study and participants will leave the workshop with a better understanding of themselves and their organization. Discussions on motivation and mechanisms of organizational cultural will provide participants with a new set of tools to move people.

This workshop will be led by Professor Paul Ingram, from the Columbia Business School. In addition to his deep knowledge of the museum community, Dr. Ingram led last year’s workshop Advancing Leadership at the AIC Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Moderators
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also esta... Read More →
avatar for Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna was recently the Chief of Conservation at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a position she held since in 2011. Previously, Tiarna worked for nine years as a paintings conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. She holds a bachelor’s degree in both chemist... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Paul Ingram

Paul Ingram

Kravis Professor of Business, Columbia Business School
Paul Ingram is the Kravis Professor Business at the Columbia Business School, and Faculty Director of the Columbia Senior Executive Program. His PhD is from Cornell University and he was on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University before coming to Columbia. He has held visiting... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

1:00pm

University of Houston Public Art Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Join Michael Guidry, Curator of University Public Art Collection, and conservator Robert Alden Marshall for a tour of the University of Houston's public art collection. Learn about the special challenges faces public art in Houston's climate.  UH was the first Texas state institution to establish a percent for art program and currently has one of the largest and most impressive university art collections in the country, which includes more than 400 works of art. The collection contains works by local, regional, national, and international artists, across all forms of media and style. With many projects in the works, the University of Houston’s Public Art Collection will remain one of the strongest in the country for years to come. Cost $49

Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:00pm - 6:00pm
University of Houston

2:30pm

Bayou Bend Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Bayou Bend is the MFAH house museum for American decorative arts and paintings. Displayed in the former home of Houston civic leader and philanthropist Ima Hogg (1882–1975), the collection is one of the finest showcases of American furnishings, silver, ceramics, and paintings in the world. The house is situated on 14 acres of organically maintained gardens in Houston’s historic River Oaks neighborhood. On this special conservation focused tour, you will not only delight in an amazing decorative arts collection but see from an insiders point of view the special conservation challenges associated with the property. Cost $39

Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:30pm - 5:30pm
Bayou Bend

2:30pm

Downtown Houston Bike Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Get to know Houston, the way you only can from the vantage point of a bicycle. Get some exercise while your guide shows you their city. Bikes and helmets will be provided Cost $55

Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:30pm - 5:30pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

Downtown Deco and Downtown East Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Take some time to see Houston before the main sessions start with a Preservation Houston walking tour. Discover Downtown Houston’s historic Art Deco core. In the 1920s and 1930s, Houston was quickly transforming from a regional center into a city of national importance. As the city grew, many builders and architects embraced the modernistic style — bold, modern and elegant — as the ideal embodiment of Houston's new spirit. This tour includes the modernistic downtown buildings that are still standing (some beautifully restored, others forgotten gems) as well as lost architecture, which we explore using descriptions and historic photos. Circumstances permitting, the tour ends with a visit to the former Gulf Building (now the JPMorgan Chase & Co. Building), a 1929 masterpiece with some of the city's most magnificent Deco interiors. Learn how much the city of Houston is changing. This tour traces the history of the area through architecture old and new, ranging from historic structures such as Union Station and the 1915 Texas Company Building to new developments like Discovery Green, which has been a catalyst for nearly $2 billion in new construction. Cost $29

Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:30pm - 5:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

Downtown Houston Food Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Discover the diversity of downtown Houston through its eclectic food scene. Visit 3-4 of Houston's most popular restaurants and learn about the city. Bring your appetite. Cost $69

Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:30pm - 6:00pm
TBA

5:15pm

Printing Museum Tour
Join this open-house style tour of the Printing Museum. Artistes’ will be demonstrating the different style printing presses. The museum will be open only to those on this tour.

Tuesday May 29, 2018 5:15pm - 7:00pm
The Printing Museum 1324 W. Clay Street Houston, Texas 77019

6:00pm

Houston History Boat Cruise
Limited Capacity full

Take a look back to the late 1800s when Houston was founded with Louis Aulbach, local historian and author of Buffalo Bayou: An Echo of Houston’s Wilderness Beginnings. Louis will share stories of the Allen brothers and provide historical information about the people, places and events along the bayou that helped shape Houston. Cost $55

Tuesday May 29, 2018 6:00pm - 8:00pm
TBA
 
Wednesday, May 30
 

7:30am

Function Meets Aesthetic: Rebacking techniques for leather books
Limited Capacity full

The repair of damaged leather binding of books is a foundation treatment for all book conservators. It poses a constant challenge because of the need to balance the functional intention of using a book while balancing time economy when working with large collections or in private practice. In this course participants will learn and review several traditional and modern techniques for the repair of both tight and hollow back. The workshop will explore the importance of secure board attachment before the application of appropriate outer covering to re-attach the original spine and boards.

This workshop will alternate demonstrations with hands-on treatment under close supervision. Participants will gain experience lifting leather, staining leather to match historical bindings, paring leather, and rebacking in both leather and kozo paper. Discussions will explore board attachment techniques prior to covering, including joint tacketing, board slotting, extended linings, and colored kozo paper mending. There will be presentations on issues relating to leather bindings, including suitable repair leathers and papers, leather dyes, pigments, surface coatings, consolidants, adhesives, and tools for lifting and paring.

This workshop is for all experience levels, although previous work with leather would be helpful. Participants should bring their own paring knife and lifting knife. The workshop will take place in the brand-new state-of-the-art conservation lab at Texas A&M University Libraries, part of a three-year renovation of the libraries. Transportation from the Houston to College Station will be provided (about 90 minutes) and is included in the event start/end time. Lunch and breaks are included in the workshop.

Instructors
avatar for James Reid Cunningham-[PA]

James Reid Cunningham-[PA]

Director, Bookbinding and Conservation
James Reid-Cunningham is a book and paper conservator in private practice. He spent thirty years as a conservator at Harvard University and the Boston Athenaeum, and served as the President of the Guild of Book Workers from 2006 to 2010. From 2009 to 2013, he was the adjunct lect... Read More →
avatar for Jeanne Goodman

Jeanne Goodman

Conservator, Texas A&M University Libraries
Jeanne Goodman is the Conservator for the University Libraries at Texas A&M University. She received her MLIS from Simmons College with a concentration in Preservation and her undergraduate work with University of Delaware in Collections Care. She completed the full-time Bookbind... Read More →

Sponsors

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30am - 6:30pm
Texas A&M University Libraries

8:30am

(Pre-session Symposium) Whose Cultural Heritage? Whose Conservation Strategy?
Limited Capacity filling up

Be part of AIC’s first Symposium on diversity, equity, inclusion and access in cultural heritage preservation. The Symposium will be divided into two parts. Part one will focus on the changing ways that museums and conservators are engaging with the diverse communities from which their collections originate.

Sessions include:

  • A panel focusing on new resources to assist conservators and collection care specialists in working collaboratively with Native American communities. The panel will also focus on collaborative conservation case studies from the National Museum of the American Indian 
  • A discussion of a recent survey on the effectiveness of Australian museums outreach efforts to the Aboriginal community.
  • A Case Study Lighting Round – hear how four different organizations engaged with diverse communities
  • Part Two will focus on what are the barriers to promoting a more diverse workforce in cultural heritage conservation and how can they be overcome. What success stories are out there and how can they be reproduced. Sessions include:
  • A review of the findings of the July – Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Art Museum Staff Demographic Survey which confirms a lack of diversity within the conservation field. Learn about some of the programs designed to foster diversity within the field
  • A discussion of the WUDPAC research study to assess the WUDPAC curriculum content and delivery through a multicultural lens 
  •  A panel of colleagues shares their individual journeys and discusses the obstacles they faced in becoming part of the conservation community.

This program will be highly interactive as all as informative. For a complete listing of presenters and titles, please see below. Lunch is included in the registration cost.

Sponsors

Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:30am - 4:15pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Bayou Bike tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Get to know Houston's Bayou and park lands, the way you only can from the vantage point of a bicycle. Get some exercise while your guide shows you their city. Bikes and helmets will be provided Cost $55

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

Packing, Crating, and Shipping Workshop
Limited Capacity full

This workshop will focus on the nuts and bolts of safely packing and shipping art and artifacts. With a focus on materials and methods, attendees will be invited to bring their questions on everything from crate construction to packing materials, from soft packing to organizing the logistics of shipping everything from a single artwork to an entire exhibition. Examples of crate standards, packing methods, and various packing solutions will be available for attendees to both view and interact with. Case studies and demonstrations will provide attendees with a better understanding of the varied approached to caring for art in transit, as well as an introduction to the types of materials that are most commonly used in fine art crates.

Instructors
avatar for Aaron Salik

Aaron Salik

TALAS
Aaron has worked at TALAS for 19 years, navigating its growth and success side by side with Jillian Salik as the second generation of the Salik family's leadership of the company.  His background in mechanical engineering proves value for understand the scientific side of creati... Read More →
avatar for Jason Carey-Sheppard

Jason Carey-Sheppard

Project Manager, Terry Dowd Inc.
I have a background in Philosophy and Visual Arts, and received an MFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts in 2012 with an emphasis in sculpture and extended media. Since 2010, I have worked in many roles in the art-logistics world, from preparator and fabricator to registrar and... Read More →
avatar for Jillian Salik

Jillian Salik

TALAS
2018 marks my 10th year working at TALAS, a supplier of specialty art supplies with a focus on art conservation, restoration, archival storage and bookbinding.  In 2011, I helped to establish the archival box making division of the company.  Building on my experience as a Fine... Read More →
avatar for Meg Colbert

Meg Colbert

Director, Boxart Inc.
I have worked at Boxart Inc., a fine art packing and crating company, since 1997. In that time I have packed art in museums, galleries, artist’s studios, auction houses, and in private collections. I am currently the Director in charge of production at Boxart, where I both help... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

From Response to Recovery; from Recovery to Response – Hurricane Lessons Learned in Galveston
During this day-long workshop, participants will learn about the damage caused by the hurricanes that have affected Galveston Island – from the storm of 1900 that fundamentally shaped the city to the most recent damage caused Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Rosenberg Library staff member Casey Edward Greene, author of “Through a Night of Horrors: Voices from the 1900 Galveston Storm,” will address how that historic storm changed the city of Galveston. FAIC’s National Heritage Responders will speak about their response efforts following Hurricane Ike in 2008. Team members responded to damage at the Rosenberg Library, Moody Mansion, the Lone Star Flight Museum, Open Gate, and sites managed by the Galveston History Foundation, including the Ashton Villa and the 1861 Custom House. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour some of these sites.
The workshop will provide an opportunity to evaluate how a city has historically responded to threats of natural disasters, look at the response and recovery efforts of FAIC’s National Heritage Responders as well as other efforts on Galveston Island following Hurricane Ike, and a review of preparedness measures put in place for Hurricane Harvey. In looking at the longer process of recovery and how it informs future preparedness, this workshop allows for a more thoughtful analysis of the success of the current response protocols, as well as the prioritization of tasks in during that extended period of recovery. As collecting institutions are encouraged to do what they can to mitigate risk, the long view of recovery can provide helpful clues for what actions will translate to successful mitigation strategies. Participants will not need a background in emergency protocols in order to benefit from this analysis of the recovery process and how it informs preparedness measures.
Transportation will be provided between the Marriot Marquis Houston and Galveston Island.

Speakers
avatar for Casey Edward Greene

Casey Edward Greene

Head of Special Collections, Rosenberg Library
avatar for Vicki Lee

Vicki Lee

Senior Conservator, National and Archives and Records Administration
Vicki Lee is currently a senior conservator at the National Archives. Vicki is the former Director of Conservation at the Maryland State Archives. She is a member of FAIC-NHR Working Group and has reponded to disasters locally, nationally, and internationally. Vicki is especially... Read More →
avatar for Karen Pavelka-[PA]

Karen Pavelka-[PA]

Senior Lecturer, UT Austin School of Information
Karen L. Pavelka is a full-time lecturer in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. She was been intimately involved with developing the conservation program when it moved from Columbia University in 1993 and continues to investigate the role of conservati... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Rosenberg Library 2310 Sealy St, Galveston, TX 77550

9:00am

Preparation and Use of Paraloid B-72 Adhesive
Limited Capacity full

B-72 was introduced for use as an adhesive by Stephen Koob in 1986, and has unfortunately not been used to its full potential (as evidenced by recent papers and comments at the 2017 Annual Meeting). Workshop participants will be introduced to a new method of preparation that allows conservation professionals to easily make up the adhesive to varying concentrations for use on a variety of materials (primarily ceramics, glass, stone, bone, ivory, and even some wood). The prepared adhesive is then poured into empty adhesive tubes, which are then closed and labeled for use.

The workshop will include a brief presentation on the use of solvent adhesives, particularly focusing on Paraloid B-72. The presentation will be followed by demonstrations of proper preparation (different consistencies for different materials, such as ceramics, glass, bone, wood) and methods of application (and clean-up). Participants will also gain hands-on experience assembling broken ceramics, glass, and other materials.

Instructors
avatar for Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Chief Conservator, Corning Museum of Glass
Stephen Koob is responsible for the care and preservation of all of the Museum’s collections. This includes cleaning the glass and making recommendations for its handling, storage, display, and movement. He also oversees the maintenance and repair of objects in the Museum... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Respirator Fit Test
Limited Capacity seats available

Whether you are using hazardous chemicals in your laboratory or working with mold-infested artifacts after a flood, you need to be protected with a properly fitting respirator. This workshop will provide the participant with access to an online lecture on respirator selection, care, and use, as well as a 15-minute, individual appointment for a personal respirator fit test, ensuring an acceptable, face-to-facepiece seal/fit of their respirator. The individual appointment provides an opportunity for participants to ask any specific questions, and to “shop” for a new half-mask, air-purifying respirator from the Committee’s selection of samples. You should bring your personal respirator if you have one.


This AIC Respirator Fit Test Program is targeted towards conservators who may not have access to a Safety Professional to conduct the test or do not have respirator fit testing available through their employer, but is open to all interested parties. This workshop is in accordance with the U.S. OSHA Standard (29CFR1910.134 - Respiratory Protection). The online lecture and fit test appointments will be conducted by a Certified Industrial Hygienist.


Individuals wishing to be fit for a respirator MUST:
  1. Register for the Respirator Fit Test “workshop” at the AIC Annual Meeting.
  2. Watch the REQUIRED online lecture and take the corresponding quiz.
  3. Schedule a fit test appointment. The appointments will be scheduled to take place in 15-minute intervals from 9:00am - 5:00pm on Wednesday, May 30, 2018.
  4. Complete a REQUIRED medical evaluation within twelve months PRIOR to your fit test. The medical evaluation must be performed by a healthcare professional. If you prefer not to use your own healthcare provider, FAIC can suggest a clinic that will review your evaluation questionnaire (additional $25 cost).
  5. Bring your Respirator Medical Clearance Approval Form signed by a healthcare professional to your scheduled appointment and get fit tested.
Once you register for the Respirator Fit Test, you will receive an email with the forms and instructions for steps to completed before the Annual Meeting.


Appointments are limited. The last day to register for a Respirator Fit Test is May 16.
Cost: $39 (non-CIPP members) /$0 (CIPP members)
With the generous support of the Conservators in Private Practice (CIPP) Specialty Group, fit tests are being offered for free to CIPP members. If you are a CIPP Member, please contact your specialty group chair for the discount code.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
TBA

9:15am

Space Center Houston - VIP Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Join us for a behind the scenes VIP tour. This tour will take you to the limited access parts of the Space Center such as the viechle mock-up area where you can see emerging NASA technology in action. We will have access to the museum exhibits and will have opportunities to discuss the issues that develop when caring for such diverse objects. The Space Center wants to customize a tour for us. Few groups get the access we will have. Those who register before December 31 will have an opportunity to participate in the refinement of the tour. Note family members are welcome on this tour, but the minimum age set by NASA is 14. Cost $179 includes lunch

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:15am - 5:00pm
Space Center Houston

10:00am

Bayou Bend and Rienzi
Limited Capacity seats available

Bayou Bend is the MFAH house museum for American decorative arts and paintings. Displayed in the former home of Houston civic leader and philanthropist Ima Hogg (1882–1975), the collection is one of the finest showcases of American furnishings, silver, ceramics, and paintings in the world. The house is situated on 14 acres of organically maintained gardens in Houston’s historic River Oaks neighborhood. Formerly the home of philanthropists Carroll Sterling Masterson and Harris Masterson III, Rienzi was designed by prominent Houston architect John Staub in 1952. Opened to the public in 1999, Rienzi houses a substantial collection of European decorative arts, paintings, furnishings, porcelain, and miniatures. On this special conservation focused tour, you will not only delight in an amazing decorative arts collection but see from an insiders point of view the special conservation challenges associated with the property. Cost $59

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 4:30pm
Bayou Bend

10:15am

Texas A&M Libraries New Conservation Lab Tour
Limited Capacity full

Join your colleagues on this special access tour of the libraries’ new preservation spaces and hybrid conservation lab, in addition to tours of collection highlights from the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives. Texas A&M University campus is located in College Station, about 90 minutes from Houston and transportation is provided. After your pleasant drive through Texas country, you will arrive just in time for lunch, included in this event, and your tour experience will begin in Cushing.
 
  • Presentation about the design and build of the Preservation spaces and conservation lab as part the overall Libraries’ renovation, a 7.4-million-dollar three year project.
  • Tours of preservation spaces and conservation lab
  • A behind-the-scenes view of the annual Book History Workshop*, including a period-accurate working English common press
  • A guided tour of the exhibit: The Angel in the Marble: Selections from the Berger-Cloonan Collection of Decorated Paper
  • Highlights from one of the largest Science Fiction and Fantasy research collections in the world, which includes the archives of George R.R. Martin, creator of Game of Thrones.
 
  Support for this tour has been generously provided by Texas A&M University Libraries.  

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:15am - 6:30pm
Texas A&M University Libraries

11:45am

Houston Natural Science Museum - Offsite Collection Storage and Museum Tour
Limited Capacity filling up

Experience a rarely offered tour of the offsite collection storage of the Natural History Museum Houston. Followed by a conservation focused collection tour lead by AIC members Ron Harvey and Renee Stein who have worked on the museum's collections. A box lunch to enjoy on the way to the collections storage will be provided. Cost $39

Wednesday May 30, 2018 11:45am - 5:30pm
Houston Natural Science Museum

12:30pm

The Ultimate Menil Campus Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Go behind the scenes at the world-famous Menil collection. Tour the main museum conservation spaces. Special collection tours of the Twombly Gallery, the Flavin installation, and the Byzantine Fresco Chapel. We will also have the rare opportunity to visit the Menil House in River Oaks. Cost $39

Wednesday May 30, 2018 12:30pm - 5:30pm
Menil Collection

1:00pm

Scratch Removal and Polishing Treatment for High-Gloss Plastic Surfaces
Limited Capacity full

Contemporary artists such as Anish Kapoor, John McCracken and DeWain Valentine are known for their large-scale sculptures with industrial high-gloss finishes. The surfaces - made of polyester resin, acrylic glass, or automotive paint, for example - seem robust, but are in fact extremely delicate and prone to scratches. The slightest defect in these pristine, highly reflective surfaces can affect their visual continuity and compromise the integrity of the artwork. Contemporary art conservators are routinely confronted with the need to execute polishing treatments, of various scales, for sculptures made of plastic, as well as treat plastic elements that are integral part of face-mounted photographs, frames, and display cases. This workshop aims to address these concerns in two parts.

This workshop will provide insight into the various materials and making processes applied by artists, enumerate the most common causes of damage - including abrasions and imprints caused by packing material or inappropriate handling - and will illustrate damage patterns typical for high-gloss plastic surfaces. The workshop will include demonstrations of treatment methods for removing scratches and restoring the high-gloss appearance of plastic finishes, applicable both locally and to large-scale surfaces. Step-by-step instruction of various sanding and polishing techniques (both by hand and using machines) will be included. The instructors will also share insight on products and brands that have proven most effective, recommendations on how to control the procedure, and the physical and chemical limits of the treatment. Participants will have the opportunity to test products and methods on mock-ups.

Instructors
avatar for Delia Müller Wüsten

Delia Müller Wüsten

Associate Conservator, Contemporary Conservation Ltd.
Delia Müller-Wüsten has been an Associate Conservator at Contemporary Conservation Ltd. since 2012. She specializes in the conservation of artworks made of synthetic materials such as latex and synthetic resins, and has expertise on highly-polished surfaces from artists such as... Read More →
avatar for Giuliana Moretto

Giuliana Moretto

Associate Conservator, Contemporary Conservation Ltd
As Associate Conservator at Contemporary Conservation Ltd. since 2009, Giuliana focuses on the conservation of objects and paintings in non-traditional materials – including bubble gum, chocolate and plastics – and innovative artistic techniques, such as Inkjet printing, vacu... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

1:30pm

Scholarly Writing: From Abstract to Publication
This 90-minute pre-meeting session is open to all with an interest in scholarly publications, including those with experience publishing that may wish to offer advice to others.

PROGRAM
Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez, Editor-in-Chief JAIC, “Introduction: Why publish in JAIC?” and will cover:
  • Aims and scope of the journal
  • Preparing your paper (content and format)
  • References
  • Checklist before submission
  • Peer review

Robin Hanson, Associate Editor for Textiles JAIC, “The outline and the importance of a writing a compelling abstract”
  • Creating and developing your article (the outline)
  • The abstract seen as the initial “sales tool” for a good paper
  • How Figures and Tables support the results presented in a manuscript

George Cooper, Managing Editor, Journals Anthropology, Conservation, Museum Studies & Heritage, Taylor & Francis, "How to get published and the benefits of being published: the publisher's perspective 

Bonnie Naugle, JAIC Managing Editor, "Postprint to JAIC"

Roundtable discussion: What do JAIC editors look for? - Work which will stand up to peer review (quality / language),  - novel to the conservation community, - original research, - research that is interesting to the journal’s readership. Q&A + Examples of common mistakes found in articles (15 min)

Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

1:30pm

Installation and Use of Automated Thread Count Software
Limited Capacity filling up

Thread counting software for both Windows and OS X platforms is now available for museum use. The software takes as input images of the paintings that reveals the canvas support (typically x-rays but also verso photographs), interacts with the user to focus the computations, and then produces a detailed thread count for the entire image. The software allows thread count information to be incorporated into a database and individual database entries shared with colleagues.

In this workshop, the use of detailed thread count information for paintings on canvas will be demonstrated. Copies of the thread counting software will be distributed and installed on user computers. Because the software must be focused on the canvas at hand, several case studies will be presented and participants will be provided examples to test their skills on setting up the software. Once thread count results are obtained, the value of a thread count database in finding canvas matches will be demonstrated.

Transportation will be provided from the Marriot Marquis Houston at 1:00PM. Transportation will also be provided back to the Marriot Marquis Houston following the workshop.

Instructors
avatar for Don Johnson

Don Johnson

Professor, Rice University
Don H. Johnson is the J.S. Abercrombie Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University, Houston, Texas. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined M.I.T... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:30pm - 5:30pm
Rice University

2:00pm

Women of Glenwood Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Historic Glenwood Cemetery is known for its beauty, but the stories of the people buried there are just as compelling — especially Glenwood's women, whose legacies range from the suffrage movement to the silver screen. This tour tells the stories of some of those fascinating women and their impacts locally and nationally. Cost $29

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Rice University and Broadacres Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

The campus of Rice University is one of the most beautiful spots in Houston thanks to the Mediterranean-influenced designs of Boston architects Cram & Ferguson, who were responsible for the university's earliest buildings. Our tour circles the campus and will include a visit to John Outram's Duncan Hall, one of the most fascinating buildings in Houston. After our campus tour we will visit the Broadacres neighborhood near Rice University. Its breathtaking oak allées and landscaping were the work of William Ward Watkin, the supervising architect of the Rice campus, and many of Houston's finest architects (John Staub, Birdsall Briscoe and Watkin among them) designed the houses that line North and South boulevards. The tour explores the architecture of these gracious homes and the stories of the oil, cotton, lumber, banking and railroad leaders who built them. Cost $29

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Talking Grants – Hear from IMLS Grant Reviewers
Be part of this informative and fast-paced program and hear from experienced IMLS collection stewardship grant reviewers as they discuss what they like to see included in proposals. This program will provide valuable insight into what can be a complex process.  Even if you are not currently working on a proposal, this program is a good investment for the future.
IMLS – One on One Appointments
 
IMLS will be offering 30 minute one-one consultation appointments on May 30-31 for those considering submitting a grant proposal. Register for the session online and you will be contacted after April 1 to schedule an appointment that fits your schedule  

Speakers
avatar for Connie Bodner

Connie Bodner

Supervisory Grants Management Specialist, Institute of Museum and Library Services


Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

Houston 2018: Storytelling as Preservation
A panel discussion on storytelling as preservation featuring Deana Haggag, President and CEO of United States Artists, MacArthur award winning artist Rick Lowe, and queer migrant poet and cultural organizier and activist Sonia Guiñansaca will be held on Wednesday, May 30th, 2018, from 4:30 to 6pm.

This free event is organized by Untold Stories (https://www.untoldstories.live), a non-profit organization committed to an art conservation profession that represents and preserves a fuller spectrum of human cultural heritage.

For more information,visit https://www.untoldstories.live/houston-2018.

Moderators
avatar for Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Associate Director/Conservator, Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Sanchita Balachandran is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She teaches courses related to the technical study and analysis of ancient objects, a... Read More →
avatar for Julianna Ly

Julianna Ly

Graduate Fellow, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
avatar for LaStarsha McGarity

LaStarsha McGarity

2nd Year Graduate Fellow, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo State)
LaStarsha is a graduate of Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas, where she received a BA in Art and Chemistry. She volunteered extensively at University Museum on TSU's campus. After completing her BA, she was the Director's Fellow at the Cleveland Museum of Art. LaStarsha... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sonia Guiñansaca

Sonia Guiñansaca

Queer Migrant Poet, Cultural Organizer, and Activist
Sonia Guiñansaca is a Queer Migrant Poet, Cultural Organizer, and Activist from Harlem by way of Ecuador. Guiñansaca a VONA/Voices alumni has performed at El Museo Del Barrio, The Nuyorican Poets Cafe, the NY Poetry Festival, Galleria de La Raza, The Met, and featured on NBC, P... Read More →
avatar for Deana Haggag

Deana Haggag

President & CEO, United States Artists
Deana Haggag is the President & CEO of United States Artists, a national arts funding organization based in Chicago, IL. Before joining USA in February 2017, she was the Executive Director of The Contemporary, a nomadic and non-collecting art museum in Baltimore, MD, for four yea... Read More →
avatar for Rick Lowe

Rick Lowe

Founder, Project Row Houses
Rick Lowe is an artist, a 2014 MacArthur Fellow and one of the founders of Project Row Houses, located in Houston’s Historic Third Ward, one of the city’s oldest African-American neighborhoods. Project Row Houses is a community platform that enriches lives through art with an... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

6:00pm

Early Exhibit Hall Access and Light Reception
Spend some more relaxed time with our Exhibitors. For the first time our exhibit will open the night before the start of the main conference. From 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm enjoy light bites and cash bars - but more importantly the chance to view the latest in products and services for the conservation field

Wednesday May 30, 2018 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

7:30pm

Bat Colony by Boat Tour
Limited Capacity full

Join us on a leisurely boat tour of the Houston Bayou to view the bat colony of Waugh Bridge. Learn more about these 250,000 magnificent Mexican free-tailed bats that share the city with us. $49

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30pm - 9:00pm
TBA

7:30pm

AIC Dinner at Pappadeaux Seafood
Limited Capacity seats available

Enjoy a relaxing dinner after your visit to the exhibit hall - join us at this Houston favorite for a good meal and good company. This will be a great opportunity to connect with old friends and meet new people before the start of the conference. Cost is $63 which includes a 3-course dinner and 1 drink (including tax and gratuity). Additional drinks available for purchase.    

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Pappadeaux Seafood

7:30pm

Emerging Conservation Professionals Network (ECPN) Happy Hour
Kick off the conference by connecting with peers and networking with established professionals at ECPN's annual Happy Hour, sponsored by the Getty Conservation Institute.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30pm - 9:00pm
TBA
 
Thursday, May 31
 

8:20am

9:00am

Materiality and Immateriality in Conserving Contemporary Art
Conservators of contemporary art have responded to conceptual, ephemeral, and time-based media with new theoretical models and strategies for practice. Along with the need for new approaches to manage variability and change on a conceptual level, material matters persist in the new objects of contemporary art. Collected materials include deteriorated plastics, desiccated food, and obsolete playback equipment. Following artist expressions about their work, these objects may be conserved in a traditional manner or may be allowed to deteriorate over time. They may also be replicated or be migrated to new technologies.
 An examination of recent literature reveals tensions in discussions of materiality and immateriality for contemporary conservation objects. Often these tensions derive from artist statements, or directives regarding the future disposition of their work. Some authors write about the language of materials, with concern when unintended alteration communicates new meaning to the viewer. Others point to patina that develops on material manifestations of conceptual art that were meant to be ephemeral but were nonetheless collected. Interviews with artists expose complex responses to the status of these accidental testaments from past installations.  Time-based media conservators face similar dilemmas, for example with commercial monitors purchased somewhat randomly by artists such as Nam June Paik. They accrue historic value over time and are seen as important evidence of the past, regardless of the artist’s original intentions.
Some recent models for understanding materiality and immateriality in contemporary art are adapted from theory across the humanities and social sciences. Nelson Goodman’s distinction between autographic (object-based) works and allographic (performed and re-produced) helps us understand authenticity in variable works that radically change through migration and replication.  Similarly, the model of object biography was adapted from anthropology to conceptualize both physical changes and the layering of social meanings that artworks accrue over the course of their lives.
Conservators of contemporary art also draw from theory, practice, and professional ethics developed for traditional conservation objects to help them navigate new issues around materiality and authenticity. Recent attention has been given to the likes of Ruskin, le-Duc, Riegl, and Brandi to revisit earlier questions of preservation vs. use, noble and vile patina, and aesthetic reintegration in conservation. Notions of risk, sustainability, and minimal intervention also influence recent thinking about the materials of contemporary art.
This presentation will trace how material and immaterial matters are treated in contemporary art conservation literature and emerging models for practice. Through analysis of the literature, an argument will be made that the values and professional ethics developed for traditional conservation objects serve new models for objects of contemporary art that are less bound by traditional material concerns.

Speakers
avatar for Glenn Wharton-[Fellow]

Glenn Wharton-[Fellow]

Clinical Professor, New York University, Museum Studies
Glenn Wharton is a Clinical Professor in Museum Studies at New York University where he teaches and writes about managing contemporary art and social justice programming in museums. He is the co-director of the Artist Archive Initiative at NYU, a project designed to promote resea... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

Practicing what we preach: An argument for the recognition and preservation of a material culture of conservation
Though we often think of modern conservation as a “young” field, the truth is that our history becomes longer with every passing day. The importance of establishing a historical record for our field has long been recognized. Substantial progress has been made through efforts such as the establishment in 1975 of the FAIC Oral History Project and more recent scholarship that considers the history of key figures, institutions, and events. Some important aspects of our history, however, have still received little to no attention. This presentation argues that, in addition to the development of a historical record, it is important to recognize and preserve the material culture of conservation. As exemplified by the theme of this year’s AIC meeting, the conservation field is partly defined by materials: those that we preserve, but also those that we use in our work. So, too, is our history. Examples of this material culture range from those objects which are already symbolic of conservation, such as Edward Forbe’s pigment collection, to historical treatment records and photography, to previously conserved objects that now serve not only as an example of the history of their own genres, but also as an indication of conservation's past and development. The preservation and future study of these objects in the context of the history of conservation will be integral to the success of ongoing scholarship in the history of conservation and of closely allied fields such as museology and art history. Study of field-specific material culture has long been an important aspect of the history of medicine, science, and archeology. This presentation will use examples of this scholarship and its effects to argue for the importance of recognizing the existence of a material culture of conservation, identifying which artifacts may fit into this category, and taking steps to preserve them now. After all, if we do not preserve our own history, who will?

Speakers
avatar for Carrie McNeal

Carrie McNeal

PhD Student, Brock University
Carrie McNeal is a student in the Interdisciplinary Humanities PhD program at Brock University in St. Catherine, Ontario. Her current research explores the history of conservation in the museum setting. She is the former Director of Conservation at The Strong in Rochester, New Yo... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Marriott Marquis Houston

10:00am

11:00am

Preserving Innovation: Considering the Treatment and Materiality of 3D Printed Objects in Museum Collections
As of 2018, it is now possible to 3D print a vast array of object-types including art, jewellery, clothing, medication, bones, and human organs. 3D printing also has an emerging presence in the cultural heritage and museum sectors: there have been 3D printing exhibitions at various institutions, with an increasing number of 3D printed objects accessioned into the permanent collections of museums. Despite the increased popularity of 3D printing and its use in the museum world, it is curious that greater consideration has not yet been given to the conservation of 3D printed objects. There seems to be no academic information or journal articles that describe the correct handling or treatment of 3D manufactured objects, with most literature focused on 3D scanning and printing as methods of digital preservation and replication. Due to the dearth of information on the conservation of 3D printed objects, this presentation will attempt to begin a dialogue on the matter. The intent is to demonstrate the complexity and scope of knowledge required for the conservation of 3D printed objects, as well as how conservators should understand and subsequently approach their unique and varied materiality. In 2013, London’s Science Museum put on a temporary exhibition entitled “3D: Printing the Future.” The exhibition included approximately 600 3D printed objects, which were composed of many different materials (including plaster, plastic, metal, ceramic, and animal cells) and were manufactured through a wide range of 3D printing processes. In 2015, close to 10% of the objects were accessioned into the permanent collection. Conservators at the museum must now devise a treatment plan with no information or precedent to guide them, as they confront the possibility of future degradation or damage to the objects. This presentation is based upon research and work as an objects conservator at the museum, and the contention that in order to provide optimal care and implement appropriate treatments upon an object, or group of objects, there must be a basic understanding of the object-type. The Science Museum’s exhibition “3D: Printing the Future” is an ideal lens through which to view the potential for conserving 3D printed objects as they are produced today. Expanding upon the exhibition, the paper discusses the applicability of existing conservation guidelines and practice when considering 3D printed objects. As new materials are developed, and 3D printed objects become more integrated into contemporary culture and manufacturing, they will undoubtedly become increasingly accessioned into museum collections. It will, therefore, become essential to understand how to ensure their longevity. This presentation confronts many issues, including the need for adequate documentation, the possibility of replication, the extent to which 3D printing presents new conservation challenges, and, significantly, how can and should these objects be conserved?

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Applebaum

Vanessa Applebaum

Objects Conservator, Science Museum, London
Vanessa Applebaum is an Objects Conservator at the Science Museum in London. Her research interests include the conservation of modern materials, Byzantine art, ethnographic and medical collections, as well as the public understanding of the field of conservation.


Thursday May 31, 2018 11:00am - 11:30pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

The Physical Nature of Digital & What it Means for Conservation
In working with digital collections, we are often asked, “What is digital? Where are the collection materials actually held? What does digital collection’s storage look like?” In an increasingly wifi-bluetooth-mobile-data world, digital can seem invisible to us as end users, however the digital world is highly dependent on technology that has material form- physical hardware, network wiring, and often entire buildings of carefully monitored and controlled infrastructure. What does this mean for art conservators? The material science of digital files held in our care is important to consider: how a file is constructed and how it tells us how it needs to be opened, played, or understood. However, equally important is the storage that those files are held on, how they are transferred from one place to another, and how they are handled at each stage of this move. What are the physical aspects that make up the storage environments of digital storage? And which of these aspects are critical for us to understand as conservators? The NDSR Levels of Digital Preservation provide a nice one-sheet listing tiered guidelines for storage, integrity, security, etc. for a digital preservation system, and the OAIS reference model gives us a framework from which to build out our digital preservation storage. But what is digital preservation storage, anyway? Is it specific hardware that is different than other digital storage that we purchase for our personal lives? For the past 10 years, the Library of Congress has been convening an annual “Storage Meeting” to discuss digital storage for collections material among collection holders and storage technologists. And out of the iPres2016 workshop, and now in draft form, is an initiative to create guidelines for collecting organizations on Preservation Storage Criteria. These are a good start to understanding digital preservation storage and may lead us towards a conversation on digital conservation practices When we understand the material nature of the digital world around us and the physical components that make up our digital ecosystem, we can more effectively care for our digital collections through the lens of the conservation field, create policies and assess risks in digital care and handling, and work productively and in partnership with our IT colleagues.

Speakers
avatar for Crystal Sanchez

Crystal Sanchez

Video and Digital Preservation Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, OCIO, DAMS
Crystal Sanchez is a media archivist at the Smithsonian Institution on the Digital Asset Management System (DAMS), working to preserve and provide access to digital collections from across the Smithsonian’s diverse Museums, Archives, Libraries, Research Centers, and the Zoo. Sh... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Sorensen

Lauren Sorensen

Consulting Archivist and Media Preservation Specialist, Self-Employed
Lauren Sorensen is a self-employed consultant and doctoral student at UCLA in Information Studies. Her research interests include digital preservation, video archives, communities of practice, and fair use. She has held positions at Library of Congress, Bay Area Video Coalition... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

12:00pm

12:30pm

(Private Practice) Getting Results: Tips and Case Study Session for Technical Analysis Resources (Part I)
Limited Capacity seats available

This two-day program will address issues and solutions for obtaining analytical results and material identification for conservators who do not have access to technical equipment or scientific expertise in their studios or laboratories. 

This session will be a selection of tips and case studies presentations of unique solutions to obtaining technical analysis, solutions to interesting problems and tips for  using, and finding services outside of conservation laboratories.

The following panel discussion (Friday, June 1: 12pm to 2pm) will include presentations and discussion on the various models for offering analytical services as well as the pros/cons, ethical and logistical considerations for conducting this kind of research. Speakers will represent various aspects of the process of obtaining analytical services: finding appropriate laboratories, different types of companies/organizations/individuals offering these services, and understanding the issues and limitations of interpreting results. 

The audience is not limited to conservators in private practice, but any individual or organization that does not have these resources.

Speakers
avatar for Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Objects Conservator, The Found Object Art Conservation
Kerith Koss Schrager is an Objects Conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation. She has worked with institutions such as Historic Hudson Valley, Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Freer|Sackler Galleries (Smithsonian Institution), Field Museum, and Shelbu... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Ship and Insure

Ship and Insure

Ship and Insure


Thursday May 31, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

1:15pm

Emerging Conservation Professionals Network (ECPN) Informational Meeting
Come meet the ECPN leadership, hear about our recent and upcoming initiatives, and learn how to get involved! This Informational Meeting will provide an opportunity to meet fellow conference attendees, ask questions about how AIC and ECPN operate, and voice your ideas for building community and resources to support emerging conservation professionals.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Gridley

Rebecca Gridley

Assistant Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Rebecca is currently an Assistant Conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She holds a BA in Art History from Yale University, and an MS in Conservation and MA in Art History & Archaeology from the Conservation Center, The Institute of... Read More →
avatar for Kari Rayner

Kari Rayner

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation, National Gallery of Art
Kari Rayner is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Kari graduated with her Master’s Degree in Art History and Certificate in Art Conservation from New York University in 2015 and interned at the Hamilton Kerr Ins... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Digging Deep: The Importance of Collaborations between Architectural Conservators and Archeologists
Excavating at an archeological site or probing a building can provide opportunities for architectural conservators and archeologists to work together. We do not collaborate as often as we should. This paper examines several projects where either there was collaboration or it was lacking and demonstrates how these two types of conservators examining materials together extracts a better understanding of what has been found. Building archeology is the study of a building. Despite the word archeology, it is not uncommon for Architectural Conservators to forget the archeologist. Removing floorboards for repairs in the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York City uncovered layers of objects including buttons, bones and tickets hidden in rats’ nests as well as material that had fallen between the floorboards over the course of a hundred and thirty years. Archeologists were a key part of the team retrieving and documenting this material for interpretation. Another type of project that would benefit from more collaboration is cemetery conservation. Often cemetery conservation is limited to repairing, aligning, and resetting markers, ensuring the cemetery looks tidy. But not all cemeteries had neatly placed gravestones surrounded by careful plantings. African American burials were often marked by grave goods or “offerings” placed upon graves. These items could be pottery and shells, as well as everyday objects such as cups, spoons, dolls heads, and clothing. Sandy Ground, a cemetery on the southern tip of Staten Island, was originally the resting place for an early free African American fishing community. It was vandalized in the 1990s. In an effort to restore the cemetery, it was cleaned up and many grave goods that were thought to be trash were lost. Archeologists can also forget that architectural conservators have extensive knowledge of historic building materials. During work on New York City Hall, a brick foundation was uncovered that was thought to be an early eighteenth century foundation. An examination by the architectural conservators found the walls were constructed of pressed brick and the mortar was natural cement, which dated the foundations well into the nineteenth century. On projects where archeologists and architectural conservators have worked together, a greater understanding of the building or site can emerge. An examination of the foundations of Federal Hall in New York City by a team consisting of an architectural conservator and an archeologist quickly dispelled the notion that the foundations were from a seventeenth century structure. An examination of walls discovered in Battery Park during work on the New York City subway system also benefited from a team of archeologists and architectural conservators working together. The excavated walls could not be saved, but the team was able to thoroughly document the techniques and materials used to construct them.

Speakers
avatar for Mary A. C. Jablonski-[Fellow]

Mary A. C. Jablonski-[Fellow]

Architectural Conservator, Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc.
Mary Jablonski is the president and founder of Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc. The firm was started in 1995 and has grown into a consistent award winning architectural conservation firm that prides itself on working with its clients to find easy to execute and easy to maint... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Book and Paper) Washi: Understanding Japanese paper as a material of culture and conservation
Washi, or Japanese paper, is both a material of cultural heritage and a material used ubiquitously in conservation. Long before it became an amazing conservation material, washi had specific purposes tied to Japanese culture. Japanese papermaking is a historical craft that has experienced significant changes in the past few decades. Sadly, not all changes are for the better—the number of papermakers is dwindling and certain types of washi have become extinct due to closure of papermaking mills responding to various pressures. The accelerated changes in the world of washi compounded by potential language barriers for conservators who are not fluent in Japanese make it difficult for conservators to be certain of how these changes might be affecting washi used for treatment.  Seminal research has been conducted in the past about Japanese papermaking materials and techniques as well as technical analysis of handmade and machine made washi to determine its most appropriate use in conservation. However, these references may not be current enough for conservators to assess papers made in modern times.
 
By maintaining a current understanding of the history and process of Japanese papers we are respecting washi as both an object of cultural importance and as a conservation material that we use so commonly. This presentation seeks to review the history and technical process of Japanese papermaking. It will look at the methods and techniques of the papermakers represented by Hiromi Paper Inc., as well as some of the toolmakers, and raw materials involved in the papermaking process. Related conservation research published to date will be covered, and methods of extracting information through visual examination of washi for practical applications in conservation will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Brook Prestowitz

Brook Prestowitz

Assistant Paper Conservator, Williamstown Art Conservation Center
Brook Prestowitz is the Assistant Conservator of Paper at the Williamstown Art Conservation Center in Williamstown, MA. She earned an MA in Conservation of Fine Art, Works of Art on Paper, from Northumbria University in 2015. Prior to her current position in Williamstown, she was... Read More →

Co-Authors
YK

Yuki Katayama

Director, Hiromi Paper Inc.
Yuki works for the California based Hiromi Paper Inc., the primary US importer of fine art Japanese papers for art and conservation. Their papers are used by notable artists, craftsmen, and conservators throughout the US. She helps to supply quality papers and other related mater... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Electronic Media) Rewind, Pause, Playback: Addressing a Media Conservation Backlog at the Denver Art Museum
While the field of electronic media conservation continues to grow in sophistication, museum acquisitions of electronic media artworks have historically outpaced the development of the field and museum professionals’ understanding of the fragility of analog audiovisual materials, software-based artworks, media installation, and other forms of electronic media art. As awareness of electronic media preservation has spread, a need to address the backlog of works already in museum collections has also come into focus. Over the course of the past seven years, the Denver Art Museum (DAM) has worked to establish institutional practice and policy directed at preserving the electronic media in the museum's collection and to deepen institutional knowledge of the complexities associated with this “new” form. However, the DAM began collecting and exhibiting electronic media artwork far before this institutional priority was in place. While developing museum-wide processes for the exhibition and preservation of new acquisitions, the museum has also taken steps to safeguard the electronic media already in the collection. The effort aimed at addressing the backlog of pressing preservation actions necessary to ensure the sustainability of these electronic media works has resulted in two survey-based projects. In 2015, a pilot project, to survey 70 electronic media objects from the AIGA Design Collection of the AD&G Department, resulted in an initial framework for preserving born-digital content. Building on the success of this survey, a broader electronic media conservation project, funded by the IMLS, began in December of 2016, and will continue through September of 2018. The goals of the DAM’s ongoing grant-funded conservation project affect every media artwork in the collection. Any material from the museum’s collection which had previously been stored on videotapes, optical discs, and external hard drives will be migrated to the museum’s digital repository, and cataloged in the museum's collection management system. In the process of performing these tasks, video playback equipment, digital storage, and physical storage needs for the institution have been assessed and improved. Much of electronic media conservation literature emphasizes the significance of a particular work’s history, promoting an approach of compiling “significant properties” through research, in order to determine the work’s “identity” and basing any treatments on this knowledge. This current project addresses the highest risk factors of the DAM’s backlog of materials in an efficient and timely manner. Therefore, the “survey style” of this project does not include complete scrutiny of each object before taking certain actions. This presentation will examine the benefits of the DAM’s approach, while also acknowledging the constraints of this pragmatic methodology.

Speakers
avatar for Eddy Colloton

Eddy Colloton

Assistant Conservator, Denver Art Museum
Eddy Colloton is currently an Assistant Conservator for the Denver Art Museum as part of an IMLS funded project to preserve the electronic media in the DAM's collection. In May of 2016, he received his MA degree from the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program at New York... Read More →
avatar for Kate Moomaw-[PA]

Kate Moomaw-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Denver Art Museum
Kate Moomaw trained in objects and modern materials at the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, graduating in 2007. She has completed a graduate internship at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and postgraduate fellowships at the Tate in London... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Objects) Manipulating Materials: Preparing and Using Paraloid B-72 Adhesive Mixtures
Recent AIC presentations (2017 Annual Meeting) indicate that there are numerous misunderstandings about the use of solvent adhesives, particularly Paraloid B-72. The increasingly popular use of Paraloid B-72 is based primarily on its notable and favorable conservation attributes. Paraloid B-72 is the most stable, reversible and dependable resin now used in conservation. It was introduced as an adhesive by the author just over 30 years ago and also has very commendable working properties, including excellent adhesion and fast setting time, but these can easily be compromised by improper preparation and improper application. This paper discusses the many ways that Paraloid B-72, or other solvent-based adhesives should be prepared, modified or manipulated to obtain easy and efficient application as well as consistent and excellent results. Preparation is critical to having a dependable solvent-based adhesive. B-72 can be very easily made up with only a few minutes of preparation, and then allowing about 8 hours for the resin to dissolve in solvent. The choice of solvent is very important, and acetone has proven to be the best solvent, on its own, or in some cases with a small amount (5-10%) of ethanol. The ratio or percentage of resin:solvent can be modified to control the application and setting time for different uses. This then allows the conservator to control the application of a thin or thicker adhesive. One additive is recommended in the initial preparation, and that is the addition of a small amount of hydrophobic fumed colloidal silica, which aids in uniform application, stabilization of the mixture, film formation and solvent evaporation. Fumed silica is an inert material, classified as a rheological agent (to control flow characteristics). It is not necessary to evaporate off any solvent after the B-72 resin has dissolved in the acetone, as the initial amount of solvent can easily be calculated for producing an adhesive of specific viscosity (or thickness). For glass, a thinner solution of approximately 60 % weight/volume is recommended because glass is non-porous and non-permeable, while a thicker solution of 72 % works better on more porous substrates, such as low-fired ceramics, porous stone, wood, bone and ivory. For best results, including application and maintaining a consistent fluid mixture, the prepared adhesive should be poured into adhesive tubes, specifically designed for solvent adhesives. This also improves the ease-of-use and accuracy of assembly.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Chief Conservator, Corning Museum of Glass
Stephen Koob is responsible for the care and preservation of all of the Museum’s collections. This includes cleaning the glass and making recommendations for its handling, storage, display, and movement. He also oversees the maintenance and repair of objects in the Museum... Read More →



Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Paintings) Surprise Encounters with Mummy Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago
The Art Institute of Chicago houses two second-century Roman-era Egyptian mummy portraits in its collection. In recent years mummy portraits have been the focus of considerable study, and the Art Institute’s examples have been examined using multiple analytical techniques in an effort to elucidate the methods and materials used in their creation. During the course of these investigations, intriguing differences between the two portraits were noted. With regard to the binding medium, one of the portraits bears the hallmark robust impasto of wax applied using the encaustic technique, and the other displays the flatter, matte appearance accompanied by the striking tratteggio and crosshatching that is often associated with tempera painting. Indeed, prior to technical examination the two paintings were perceived as such. Analysis of the binding medium of the first portrait using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) demonstrated, unsurprisingly, that it is composed of wax, supporting a description of the technique as encaustic. However, analysis of the second portrait unexpectedly also revealed the presence of wax. A limited number of published studies of media analyses of other portraits which yielded the same dichotomous results—assumed to be egg or glue based on visual appearance but found to be wax upon technical investigation—has confirmed the existence of similar objects in other collections. The Chicago painting is, consequently, one of a growing corpus of portraits that thrusts a tint of grey into an art historical construct that has been presented as quite black and white. Additionally, both portraits were examined with a combination of non-invasive in-situ scanning X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and near infrared luminescence imaging (visible induced luminescence spectroscopy, VILS). The presence of cuprorivaite, or ‘Egyptian blue’, was detected on both portraits, but its character and distribution varied startlingly between them. This discovery raises numerous questions as to the artists’ working methods, material choices, and the transmission of techniques between the Fayum region and the wider Graeco-Roman world. The analyses of the Chicago portraits, alongside collaborative work with other institutions housing similar portraits, adds to the body of information that will hopefully, ultimately address such questions. But it also serves as useful reminder that works of art often resist clear categorization since they are, after all, human creations and thus subject to the individualities and idiosyncrasies of their makers.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects, Art Institute of Chicago
RACHEL C. SABINO has been Associate Conservator of Objects at the Art Institute of Chicago since 2011 where, in addition to treatment-related activities, she has been a co-author of the museum's online scholarly catalogue of Roman art. Rachel held previous positions at the Nation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Emeline Pouyet

Emeline Pouyet

Post doctoral fellow, Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago
Emeline Pouyet is a post-doctoral fellow at the NU-ACCESS center (Chicago, U.S.A). She received her M.S. degree in Archaeometry in 2010 and completed her Ph.D. studies in 2014 at the ID21 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). Her activities f... Read More →
avatar for Federica Pozzi

Federica Pozzi

Associate Research Scientist, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Federica Pozzi, Associate Research Scientist at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, leads the Network Initiative for Conservation Science (NICS), a pilot program aiming to support New York–area museums that do not have access to a state-of-the-art scientific research facility. Fede... Read More →
KS

Ken Sutherland

Conservation Scientist, Art Institute of Chicago
Ken Sutherland is a scientist in the Department of Conservation and Science at the Art Institute of Chicago. He held previous positions as scientist in the Conservation Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Research Fellow in the Scientific Research Department of the N... Read More →
avatar for Marc Walton

Marc Walton

Research Professor of Materials Science and (by courtesy) Art History, Senior Scientist, Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago
Marc Walton is a Research Professor of Materials Science and (by courtesy) of Art History and a Senior Scientist at Northwestern University / Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts (NU-ACCESS)

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Comparison of LED, L-37 Filtered Xenon Arc, and Glass-Filtered Cool White Fluorescent Illumination in the Light Fading and Light-Induced Staining of Color Photographs
During the past several years, there has been a large-scale shift from UV-filtered tungsten halogen illumination to high Color Rendering Index (CRI) LED illumination in museums, galleries, archives, and libraries, along with widespread adoption of generally lower CRI lamps in public buildings, commercial establishments, and homes. The majority of light stability information on the indoor fading and staining of analog and digitally-printed color photographs published in the past 30 years has been based on accelerated tests conducted with glass-filtered and UV-filtered Cool White fluorescent illumination. At the present time, for a number of important reasons, Wilhelm Imaging Research, HP, Epson, and Kodak Alaris, among others, continue to conduct accelerated light fading tests using this illumination source.  However, "ISO International Standard 18937:2014, Imaging materials – Photographic reflection prints – Methods for measuring indoor light stability," specifies L-37 filtered xenon arc illumination for “simulated display in indoor indirect daylight through window glass.” JEITA Standard CP3901A also specifies L-37 filtered xenon arc illumination. Work is currently in progress on "ISO 18937-4, Imaging materials – Photographic reflection prints – Methods for measuring indoor light stability – Part 4: LED Illumination." Working together with Shigeo Suga of Suga Test Instruments of Tokyo, Japan, Henry Wilhelm is serving as Co-Project Leader in the development of this new ISO standard. Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. has designed and constructed new temperature and humidity-controlled accelerated light stability test equipment for LED lamps. This paper will present comparative fading and staining data for a representative group of color photographic print materials, including silver-halide color (chromogenic) prints made with Kodak Alaris Endura Premier Professional Paper and Fujicolor Crystal Archive PDN Professional Paper (also to be discussed is the newly-developed "Improved Light-Stability" Fujicolor Crystal Archive Professional Paper that was publicly announced at the IS&T Digital Printing Technologies Conference in Denver, Colorado on November 8, 2017, and will be commercially introduced in September 2018 at the Photokina trade show in Cologne, Germany); Epson UltraChrome HDR pigment inkjet prints; Epson EcoTank (Epson 664 dye inks) dye inkjet prints; ChromaLuxe dye-sublimation photographs printed on an intermediate transfer paper with Epson UltraChrome DS (dye sublimation) inks and then thermally transferred under high heat at 190–205°C (375–400°F) and pressure (60–80 PSI) for 2–4 minutes onto a rigid, specially coated ChromaLuxe aluminum support; and ChromaLuxe dye-sublimation photographs printed in the same manner with Sawgrass 8-color Sublijet HD Pro Photo XF dye-sublimation inks. The prints have been subjected to accelerated tests using high-intensity 25 klux LED illumination from SORAA Vivid PAR 38 violet (purple) pump emitter LED lamps with a CRI of 95 and CCT of 3000K (1000 lumen output, 60°FL, 18.5-watt SORAA SP38-18-60D-930-03) with glass-filtered, UV-filtered, and non-filtered (bare-bulb) exposure conditions.  For comparison purposes, prints have been exposed to illumination from single-phosphor OSRAM Sylvania High Output (HO) 4200K Cool White (JIS F-6) fluorescent lamps (made in Canada) with glass-filtered, UV-filtered, and non-filtered bare-bulb exposure conditions.  In addition, in ongoing tests, prints have been exposed to xenon arc illumination (equipped with water-cooled Hoya L-37 glass filters and dual IR filters) in a Suga SX75F temperature- and humidity-controlled xenon arc test unit equipped with dual refrigerated chamber air and water-jacketed xenon lamp cooling systems that simulate indoor indirect daylight through window glass, both with and without a UV filter.  Illumination levels, sample surface temperature, test chamber temperature, and relative humidity conditions have been maintained as close as possible to the same aim-points. Identical methods of test target measurement and analysis for reporting fading and staining data are employed. Tungsten-halogen and L-37 filtered xenon illumination, however, present a number of difficult technical issues in terms of maintaining uniform sample surface temperatures, moisture levels, uniform illumination levels, and mitigating other factors that can result in poor inter-laboratory agreement between different testing organizations, and this will be discussed in the presentation.  The spectral power distributions in the UV, Visible, and IR regions for all of the illumination sources will be given, including the spectral properties of LED lamps based on blue pump emitters and LED lamps based on violet (purple) pump emitters.  Related topics that will briefly be discussed include:  Lux (a measure of light intensity as perceived by the human eye – and its generally not straightforward relationship to rates of fading and light-induced staining), Color Rendering Index (CIE CRI), IES TM-30-15, Television Lighting Consistency Index (TLCI), Color Quality Scale (CQS), and Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) for LED lamps will be described.  Potential differences between blue pump emitter LED illumination and violet (purple) pump emitter LED illumination in terms of their potential impacts on the fading rates of color photographs – and, likely, paintings, watercolors, other works of art, fabrics, books, and historically important documents – will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Henry Wilhelm

Henry Wilhelm

Director of Research, Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc.
Henry Wilhelm is Director of Research at Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. in Grinnell, Iowa, USA. Wilhelm has authored or co-authored more than 30 technical papers presented at conferences sponsored by the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T), the Imaging Society of Ja... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Richard Adams

Richard Adams

Associate Professor, School of Graphic Communications Management, Ryerson University
Richard M. Adams II, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the School of Graphic Communications Management at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. He teaches courses in document design, web design, and material science for print. His research interests include color management, electr... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) Fiber and Yarn Cross-section Sample Preparation Methods for Effective Plant Fiber Material Characterization and Identification
Fiber cross-section observation is often essential when characterizing and identifying plant fiber artifacts. A number of bast fibers and leaf fibers have very similar morphologies in the longitudinal direction but they differ more distinctively from each other in cross-section features. Most of the existing methods of fiber or yarn cross-section sample preparation, for either light or scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations, are not designed for handling fragile archaeological materials. The aim of this research project was to identify and develop effective fiber or yarn cross-section preparation methods which can be used for studying fragile archaeological textile objects. This study compared three fiber or yarn cross-section sample preparation methods for SEM observation including epoxy embedding, modified plastic fiber cross-section plate and free-hand as well as another three methods for light microscopic (LM) observation, including epoxy embedding and ultra-thin cross-sectioning, free-hand sectioning of embedded fiber or yarn sample and Precision Cross-section Microtome. All these methods were applied to the same archaeological textile remains retrieved from an early 16th century shipwreck site. Several known fiber or fiber plant samples were also studied for reference purposes, including hemp, jute, sisal, abaca, stinging nettle and flax. The SEM results showed that the adoption of a plastic cross-section plate designed for LM usage was the most effective fiber or yarn cross-section preparation method. The plate is cheap and easy to use. Either fiber or yarn samples can be placed into the 1-2 mm holes within the plastic plate using a known synthetic fiber as buffer or protection around the archaeological fiber sample. As to the three methods for LM observation, the most efficient method was free-hand sectioning of fiber or yarn embedded in common slide preparation solution. When dealing with very fragile sample, however, the best method was epoxy resin embedding and ultra-thin cross-sectioning (1 micrometer). This method minimizes sample distortion and keeps the sample intact. However, a phase contrast microscope is needed for observing and imaging the obtained ultra-thin cross-section samples. Based on all the cross-section images obtained from both archaeological textile samples and reference fibers or fiber plant samples, we recommend using yarns to prepare cross-section sample for either SEM or LM observation when possible. The cross-section of yarns could provide not only fiber information but also other plant tissue cell characteristics. The later can be critical when identifying a specific fiber plant. When studying very fragile archaeological textile material, we recommend the method of epoxy embedding and ultra-thin sectioning, although this method is most time consuming. The other two methods using plastic fiber cross-section plate for SEM observation and free-hand sectioning of embedded sample for LM observation are quick, easy, effective and applicable to most of textile materials. Finally, the results of this project demonstrated again that fiber cross-section study is essential when identifying and characterizing archaeological plant fiber artifacts.

Speakers
avatar for Runying Chen

Runying Chen

Associate Professor, East Carolina University
Runying Chen, Ph.D., Associate Professor Dr. Chen received her Ph.D. in Human Ecology, majoring in textile science with concentration in analytical chemistry, in 1998 from the Ohio State University. She has been teaching at the Department of Interior Design and Merchandising of E... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Tom Fink

Tom Fink

Biology Department Imaging Laboratory Manager, East Carolina University
Tom Fink received his PhD from Florida State University. He manages Biology Department Imaging Laboratory, conducts and assists research projects using the laboratory facilities. Dr. Fink also teaches biology imaging courses for both undergraduate and graduate students at East Ca... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

(Wooden Artifacts) Inside the Frames of Stanford White: A Technical Study
Stanford White (1853-1906) is well-known as an architect at the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White in New York, where he was a partner from 1879 until his unexpected death in 1906. Although he was best known for his architectural work and interior designs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art holds over a dozen picture frames that were designed by White. A technical study of Stanford White frames in the Metropolitan’s collection was carried out by the author as part of an Annette de la Renta Junior Fellowship in the Department of Paintings Conservation. Seven frames, designed between 1889 and 1900, were examined using various analytical techniques, to complement existing studies which focus mainly on stylistic elements and on White’s professional relationships and collaborations. Just as his interior designs, White’s frame designs can be placed in the context of the late nineteenth-century Aesthetic Movement, which included an array of styles, resulting in highly artistic and aestheticized designs with a great variety of decorative elements. The frames were designed for specific paintings that were painted by White’s contemporaries, many of whom were his personal friends. White held close tabs on his frame designs, whether unique frames matching specific paintings or standard designs. Neither client nor frame maker was allowed to execute his frame or ornament designs without his permission. After his death the standard designs, documented with photographs, molds and samples, continued to be fabricated. Copies of his frames were made as well. His elaborate frame designs with distinctive, often architectural ornaments, are fascinating works of art that had not been extensively studied technically. This paper will present the results of the technical study. It will discuss observations about manufacturing processes, such as the use of joints associated with cabinetry and the use of copper wire in cast ornaments. Moreover, it will address the originality of the surfaces, such as the direct application of gilding on a wooden substrate, without a gesso preparation. The technical results are complemented with findings from archival research at the Avery Architecture and Fine Arts Library (Columbia University), which holds correspondence on numerous of White’s projects. The interdisciplinary approach of technical and archival research is especially valuable whenever material aspects of the original frames are lost, covered or altered. This study has provided valuable insights in American frame making towards the end of the nineteenth century. As an architect and designer in America’s Gilded Age, Stanford White elevated frame making to a form of art. Examining the technical aspects of White’s frame designs also adds to the growing appreciation of frames as art objects in their own right.

Speakers
avatar for Tess Graafland

Tess Graafland

Junior Conservator of Frames and Gilding, Rijksmuseum
Tess Graafland graduated from the University of Amsterdam with a Master degree and Professional Doctorate in Conservation and Restoration of Wood and Furniture in 2014. She took internships at both the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, in fu... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
TBA

2:00pm

2:30pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Loves Me like a Rock: Care and Preservation of Ancient Graffiti in a Rock-Cut Kushite Temple
This talk describes the preservation of ancient graffiti in a rock-cut temple at the site of El Kurru in Sudan. El Kurru is the location of a royal burial ground of ancient Kush (a region located in modern-day northern Sudan), and the site encompasses multiple pyramid burials as well as two rock-cut funerary temples. The sandstone temple that is the focus of this project was built during the late Napatan period (ca. 350 BC), and its walls and columns are heavily inscribed with devotional graffiti from the Meroitic period (ca. 100 BC – AD 100). It is an impressive and unique structure, a source of pride for local residents, and an interesting and accessible feature for visitors. The ancient graffiti it contains provide a unique glimpse into the lives of individuals in antiquity, providing information about their thoughts, values, and daily lives. El Kurru’s sandstone monuments suffer from granular disintegration and other serious condition problems. Although the conservation of archaeological heritage is often complicated, it is especially challenging in Sudan due to a fragile national economy and comprehensive intertnational sanctions against the country (except - these were just lifted in October 2017! - so it might get better!). For these reasons, a holistic approach has been used to preserve the graffiti. Work began with a criterion-anchored rating (CAR) condition survey designed to identify, prioritize, and monitor condition issues. Chemical analysis of the stone was conducted, and treatment options including alkoxysilane consolidation and grout injection were explored. Preventive conservation strategies for the temple, including a protective shelter and increased community education, have also been developed. Finally, reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) was used to document the graffiti’s condition and create a virtual, visual catalog. This talk emphasizes key principles for guiding conservation at archaeological sites: practicality, flexibility, sustainability, and placing a high value on the contributions and wishes of stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Suzanne Davis-[Fellow]

Suzanne Davis-[Fellow]

Curator and Head of Conservation, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan
Suzanne Davis is an associate curator and the head of conservation at the University of Michigan's Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Prior to joining the Museum in 2001, she was a conservator for the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval Historical Center in Washington, D.C. She... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Janelle Batkin-Hall

Janelle Batkin-Hall

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation, National Museum of African Art
Janelle Batkin-Hall is a Mellon Fellow in objects conservation at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art. She is a graduate of the Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State College, SUNY. Her research interests include technical imaging, microscopy, and the conservation... Read More →
avatar for Carrie Roberts-[PA]

Carrie Roberts-[PA]

Conservator, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
Caroline Roberts is a conservator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology at the University of Michigan. She is a graduate of the Winterthur / University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, and is a professional associate of the AIC. Her interests include the conservation and pr... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Book and Paper) Optical Clearing of Repair Tissues for the Treatment of Translucent Papers
There are many types of translucent papers, each with its own set of conservation issues stemming from various manufacturing processes. The characteristic that makes them stand apart from other papers—transparency—can itself be at risk when there is a need for applying mending or lining tissues. This project explores the physical aspects of paper transparency, and investigates the concept of optical clearing (transparentizing) of repair tissues, with the goal of achieving appropriate repairs on translucent papers without dramatically increasing the opacity of treated areas. The term “optical clearing” is borrowed from the fields of biology and medical research; it refers to the process of rendering biological tissues transparent through the application of clearing agents, which minimize the scattering of light and allow greater visibility for microscopy and imaging. This is similar to some historical processes of transparentizing paper, in which oils, waxes and rosins were added to fill light-scattering interstices, allowing more light to travel unimpeded through the paper web. This concept is applied to conservation repair tissues, with the goal of determining a coating to serve dual functions: optical clearing agent and reactivatable adhesive.

A wide range of adhesives and coatings familiar to paper conservation was tested for their transparentizing effects on a variety of repair tissues, including more traditional Japanese papers and the recently developed nanocellulose papers. Opacity measurements were taken using a spectrophotometer and the contrast-ratio method. Acrylic polymer dispersions proved to be the most consistently successful clearing agents. The most substantial transparentizing effects occurred in gampi-fiber Japanese tissues, with some cleared by over 90% of their original opacity. This can be attributed to the superior film-formation qualities of the acrylic dispersions and their amorphous polymeric structure. The heat-reactivation capability of acrylic adhesives also proves advantageous for the treatment of translucent tissues, which tend to react dramatically to moisture.

A range of repair methods was applied to modern translucent tissue samples. These were measured for opacity before and after treatment to compare to repairs made with cleared tissues. SEM cross-sectional imaging was used to visualize adhesive penetration. Attempts at removing each repair were also made to characterize ease-of-reversibility. The long-term stability of optically cleared repair tissues is considered alongside an aging test that measures the yellowing and turbidity of acrylic transparentizing coatings under different light exposures.

The application of the optically cleared tissues is discussed via the treatment of two large objects possessing damaged transparent overlays: Atlas Photographique de la Lune (Observatoire de Paris, 1896–1910) and Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Wasmuth Portfolio” (1910). The suitability of different clearing agents in varying contexts is also considered, such as in the treatment of coated transparent papers.

Speakers
avatar for Roger S. Williams

Roger S. Williams

Conservation Fellow, Northwestern University Library
Roger Williams is the current conservation fellow at Northwestern University Libraries. He earned his MA in Conservation Studies (Books & Library Materials) from West Dean College and the University of Sussex in 2015. He worked previously at the Rare Book School at the University... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Electronic Media) Archiving Computer-based Artworks
Art museums throughout the world have been acquiring computer-based artworks with increasing confidence. As artist-created hardware and software enters museum collections, it presents unique challenges for long-term preservation. Conservation staff at these institutions face urgent questions about appropriate materials to collect related to these works and how to define their technical, functional, and conceptual constituents.

The Guggenheim acquired its first computer-based artwork in 1989, Jenny Holzer’s Untitled, a colossal LED sign installed in the museum’s rotunda. Since that time, the collection has expanded to include examples of artist-created websites, custom-made microcontroller units, artist-modified computers, and installations involving video games. As a part of the museum’s initiative to “Conserve Computer-based Art” (CCBA) in its collection, this paper takes a critical look at the physical and digital elements that museums retain or generate in order to archive and preserve their computer-based artworks.

Drawing from the Guggenheim’s own CCBA collection survey and back-up project, which encompasses artworks from a range of ages and employing a variety of technologies, the paper provides an overview of collected digital assets and documentation, investigates crucial archival elements that are missing in hindsight, and proposes elements that museums should consider obtaining or creating now in order to sustain the collection life of their software- and computer-based artworks.

The paper will devote particular attention to: disk imaging of artist-provided computers, web servers, and removable media (such as floppy disks and CDs); measures that can be taken to enable future access to these disk images; capturing metadata about the hardware and software that an artwork depends upon to function; exploring instances where obtaining source code alone proves insufficient to sustain the life of an artwork; and the importance of technical and descriptive metadata for future migration or emulation of a work. Where relevant, the research draws from the knowledge and experience of the allied fields of computer science, library science, archival studies, and digital preservation. The paper highlights how understanding the practices of these fields as well as engaging in interdisciplinary collaboration becomes essential for conservators to fulfill their mandate as stewards of computer-based art.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Farbowitz

Jonathan Farbowitz

Fellow in the Conservation of Computer-based Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Jonathan Farbowitz, the Guggenheim's Fellow in the Conservation of Computer-based Art, assists the Conservation department in addressing the preservation needs of computer-based works in the Guggenheim’s collection. He also supports the development of best practices for collect... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Objects) Visible effects of adhesive and pressure on color in kingfisher feathers
Structurally colored feathers render color through physical scattering of light rather than pigments. There is an expected, but heretofore unexplored, effect of adhesive choice and pressure on the color of these materials. Further, such feathers are generally considered to be more light-stable than pigmented examples. In the current study, structurally colored blue kingfisher feathers are used to examine these effects in order to guide conservation treatments and preventive care.

The Chinese tradition of tian-tsui, literally 'dotting with kingfishers', describes a technique of cloisonné style jewelry that utilizes blue, blue-green, and purple feathers instead of fused glass powder. The feathers are adhered to a backing, usually metallic, though occasionally composed of thick layers of paper. This technique appears in Chinese culture from as early as the first century BCE, though surviving examples date most prevalently to the Qing dynasty (19th century) (Chambers et al. 1981, 32). The early featherwork items were not restricted to jewelry, but also appeared in the form of feather mosaics on clothing, bed coverings, and palanquins (Chambers et al. 1981, 32; Garrett 1994, 86). Such items are now ubiquitous in museum collections. Through a technical study of kingfisher feather jewelry from the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College in Claremont California, as well as accelerated light aging studies and pressure tests completed on mocked up samples of recently plucked kingfisher feathers at both the UCLA/Getty and the Getty Conservation Institute labs, I evaluate the effects of original and conservation/restoration adhesives and coatings, and effects of mechanical interactions, on the structural colors of the feathers.

For the experimental part of the study, feather specimens from skins of Halcyon smyrnensis, the White-breasted Kingfisher, donated by the United States Fish and Wildlife Department, were plucked, trimmed, and adhered onto inert quartz glass plates and subjected to three methods of light aging, with color measurements occurring after aging with an integrating sphere. The accelerated light aging methods included museum conditions (free of ultraviolet radiation), window conditions (ultraviolet radiation present), and high intensity UVA conditions, with an additional control group kept in the dark. Adhesive systems tested were those documented as having been used originally or in the conservation of kingfisher featherwork, including: protein glues (gelatin and isinglass), funori, methylcellulose, and Paraloid B-72. Characterizing the adhesives used on the Scripps collection items provided supporting technical evidence.

Taken together, the results of this study provide insights into kingfisher feather tian-tsui technology, and the effect of adhesive systems and mechanical actions on the preservation of color within these structurally colored feathers. Findings will be presented about the color stability, both separately and upon interaction with different adhesives, leading to recommendations for adhesive choices for the conservation of such featherwork. Further, results of mechanical disruption of kingfisher feather coloration will be illustrated. Experimental work and technical analysis provide an enhanced understanding of a complex material, effectively aiding its conservation and preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Michaela Paulson

Michaela Paulson

Graduate Student Researcher, UCLA/Getty Masters Program for the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Michaela Paulson received her B.A. in Archaeology with a minor in Art History from Tufts University in 2012. She spent the next three years at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, immersed in the technical processes of three dimensional studio art. Her experience in o... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Paintings) A Convenient Method: Canvas Painting in 16th Century Florence
In 16th century Italy, the use of canvas as a support for paintings was more closely associated with Venice than with Florence, yet Florentine painters utilized canvas for certain projects. It has been noted that this usually indicates that these paintings were created for specific purposes such as banners. However, these functions are not always so obvious, and this major clue to the origin of a work can go ignored. This study explores the reasons for using canvas by looking at the works themselves as well as contemporary writings including Vasari on Technique. Vasari, proudly grounded in the Tuscan tradition of panel painting, had a definite respect for the utility of canvas; he writes that it is a “convenient” support, a word which for him had ethical as well as practical connotations. Such research can help re-contextualize works especially those that were not originally conceived as independent paintings. By looking at materials and techniques, as well as evidence of damage and alteration, a painting has recently been identified as part of a temporary decoration (apparato) created for the Medici wedding of 1565; that case study is the core of this paper. At the time, such decorations were extremely important, created by the leading artists of the day, including Pontormo, Bronzino and Alessandro Allori. Designed as ephemera, few have survived, and they are almost forgotten as an art form. Canvas was “convenient” for these decorations not only because – as is often mentioned – it was cheaper, lighter and could be made quite large – but also because it could easily and thriftily be made to an exact, predetermined size so as to fit in an architectural framework that was itself the ancestor of the modern theater set. Using very simple examination techniques - measuring canvas widths, looking at seaming and scalloping as well as ground types and thicknesses and the range of pigments used – a great deal can be understood about this early modern installation art as well as other uses of canvas by artists for whom it was a specific choice. The advantages they found would then inform the more common use of canvas in later centuries.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dommermuth-[Fellow]

Jean Dommermuth-[Fellow]

Senior Conservator, ArtCare Conservation, A Rustin Levenson Company
BA in Art History and MBA, University of Illinois; MA in Art History and Diploma in Art Conservation, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. After earning her graduate degree in conservation, Jean completed a two year internship focusing on the treatment of old master paint... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Photographic Materials) Evaluation of Hydrolytic Accelerated Aging Protocols on Cellulose Acetate
A collaborative research project between the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) and the Walt Disney Animation Research Library (ARL) is investigating the effects of storage environment on stability of animation cels. One aspect includes an evaluation of accelerated aging methods to create aged mockups in parallel condition to naturally-aged cels. For cellulose diacetate (CDA) animation cels created between 1940s-1980s, the support material is particularly prone to degradation by hydrolysis and chain scission, while reviewing archival records reveal a variety of storage environments prior to 1996. To date there has yet to be a comprehensive study of CDA reaction kinetics and mechanism of degradation of the problematic art material, nor are there established projections of risk based on specific storage conditions and containment. As part of the evaluation, cellulose triacetate (CTA) and CDA from the Disney ARL collection were compared to thermally-aged set of prepared mock-ups without plasticizers, in order to calculate the rate constant through Arrhenius methods. In some cases CA materials were pre-incubated to ascertain the physical effects of the reaction from within a cel before aging in the CTA industry standard of aluminum/polypropylene (Al/PP) and vapor barrier polyvinyl-fluoride (PVF) heat-sealed bags. This was compared with other cases where CA degradation reaction may be promoted by an environment, by aging within Teflon crimp-lid glass vials with the reactant of water or the catalyst of acid, which is the byproduct of hydrolysis reaction. The depth of penetration of degradation in CA will be assessed by utilizing the rate constant in conjunction with depth-profiling FTIR. Initial results after one month of accelerated aging revealed the Al/PP packaging method resulted in the highest degradation, followed by the glass vials, with the smallest effects seen in the PVF bags. The changes were confirmed by several analytical methods of detecting % acetyl content, including ion chromatography and FTIR. Other key findings of this research indicated plasticizers enhanced the degradation rates in the cels. Moreover, incubation pre-aging enhanced hydrolysis of all these CA plastic films from worst to least: one Molar acetic acid environment, ~85 %RH, and ~55 %RH across all samples analyzed. Initial observations show liquid is trapped between cels when stacked together and aged, but further research will be required to determine the influence of separating each cel in storage. Disney CTA and CDA, and CDA mock-ups aged alongside interleaving, buffered, and box materials aid in assessing the impact of storage materials on CA stability used in the Disney ARL collection. Long term impact of this research is contributing to the understanding of degradation kinetics to assist in predicting CA longevity, as well as providing guidelines for storage conditions and packaging containers.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Carta

Carolyn Carta

Research Lab Assistant, Getty Conservation Institute
Carolyn Carta joined the GCI in 2016 as a research lab assistant to lead scientific studies as part of the GCI's collaborative research project with the Disney Animation Research Library. She graduated in 2011 with a BA in art history, studio art, and chemistry from Trinity Colle... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Katharina Hoeyng

Katharina Hoeyng

Katharina Höyng
Katharina Hoeyng recently moved to Amsterdam where she works as a freelance conservator. Prior to that Kathariana joined the Getty Conservation Institute from 2015-2018. As part of the Preservation of Plastics project, she researches and evaluates treatment methods for reattachin... Read More →
avatar for Herant Khanjian

Herant Khanjian

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Herant Khanjian received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from California State University, Northridge and has been a member in the Science department of the Getty Conservation Institute since 1988. His research interests involve the detection and identification of organic m... Read More →
avatar for Joy Mazurek

Joy Mazurek

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Joy Mazurek specializes in the identification and characterization of natural and synthetic organic materials by a number of analytical techniques including gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. She also works on the classification of biomarkers produced by... Read More →
avatar for Kristen McCormick

Kristen McCormick

Art Exhibitions and Conservation Manager, Walt Disney Animation Research Library
Kristen McCormick has been at the Walt Disney Company for over a decade and a half where she has been responsible for the safe keeping, care and transport of a broad range of artworks from African Art to Animation. In her current role she oversees the conservation care of the Wal... Read More →
avatar for Michael Schilling

Michael Schilling

Senior Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Michael Schilling is a senior scientist engaged in materials characterization research at the Getty Conservation Institute, where he has worked since 1983. He holds BS and MS degrees in chemistry from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. His research interests include... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) Untangling Indian Hemp: Understanding and Identifying Common Plant Fibers Used by Native Americans in the Woodlands Region
Bast fibers from North American plant species make up a significant portion of textiles produced by Woodlands cultures. These fibers, which are derived from the inner stems of certain plant species, are a traditional and important to many nations in the Northeast and Great Lakes region, yet have received little attention from Western-focused academia. Much of the literature and fiber identification is unclear, incorrect, or based on a Western perspective. Fibers are frequently referred to as “Indian Hemp,” which aside from being an inherently problematic term, has several meanings. This research aims to collaborate with Indigenous community members to identify traditional fiber producing plants and how they utilized to produce textiles. Three Native American experts in fiber preparation were invited to the National Museum of the American Indian Cultural Resource Center to share and discuss harvesting, processing and weaving, as well as the cultural and material significance of these fibers. As an outcome, a handling collection of physical samples as well as polarized light and scanning electron micrographs will be created to aid in understanding of both the macro and micro properties of these materials. The reference collections and appropriate associated cultural information are available to conservators, curators, and Native and non-Native researchers to improve accuracy of fiber identification, enhance material understanding, and reinforce cultural knowledge. Images will also be made available on online for wider access. By understanding both the physical and cultural context of materials, conservators can make more appropriate decisions about the care of our collections. Allowing indigenous voices to be the authority on their own cultural heritage not only begins the decolonization process of museums, but enriches the institution as well.

Speakers
avatar for Nora Frankel

Nora Frankel

Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation, National Museum of the American Indian
Nora Frankel is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Past work includes positions at the Rijksmuseum, Burrell Collection, Death Valley National Park, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, an... Read More →

Co-Authors
SH

Susan Heald-[PA]

Textile Conservator, National Museum of the American Indian
Susan Heald has been the National Museum of the American Indian’s textile conservator since 1994, where she has supervised many pre-program interns and post-graduate fellows. Prior to NMAI, she served as the Minnesota Historical Society’s textile conservator, and wa... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Lam

Thomas Lam

Physical Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University. After his Ph.D, Thomas completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Thomas is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledg... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

2:30pm

(Wooden Artifacts) A case study of the examination and conservation treatment of a mid-18th c. American made chair, and the processes of recreating missing carved elements using tradition methods.
In 1857, Thomas U. Walter designed the chairs and desks that would furnish the Hall of Representatives for the Thirty-fifth United States Congress. Designs for the chair were completed in the spring of 1857, and an order of 262 chairs was split between two separate manufactures. The deadline for the chairs was for December 1st 1857. The MFA, Boston acquired 1 of the 262 chairs in 1980. The armchair’s structure was stable, but the surface was in very poor condition and there was extensive loss of the decorative carved wood molding. The chair was missing molding on both front leg corners, and the entire length of molding under the proper left seat rail. The molding had a beveled edge design with a carved heart and dart pattern on the top surface. Due to the large quantity of the missing moldings, it was decided that fills would be carved from oak to match the surviving molding. In order to draft and carve the fills, an examination was carried out to understand the original methods used to make the chair. This included identifying which parts were machine-made verses handmade. During a visual examination, it became apparent that the chair’s frame was machine cut, and the decorative elements were hand carved. X-ray analysis confirmed that majority of the hand carved molding was simply glued to the main frame. This evidence supported the idea that the chair was part of an assembly line production system. Several attempts of the fills were made using different degrees of machine and hand tooling. Creating the fills using traditional methods proved to be very successful. It also revealed the skills and shortcuts of the original manufacturer. There was very little historical documentation about the chair in the museum records. However, it did state that the attributed maker was Bembé and Kimbel, a New York City based company. During the mid-18th c., the Bembé and Kimbel company was well establish and greatly acclaimed for their high quality of handmade furniture. Based on the evidence found during the chair’s initial examination, suspicion arose over the attributed maker of the chair. Further investigation lead to the second manufacturer that helped complete the large order of chairs. The Desk Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia was contracted to help fulfill half of the order. The company was commissioned because they advertised their fast, large scale machine manufacturing techniques. The evidence of the chair’s construction, as well as additional historical documentation, helped confirm that the MFA’s chair was made by The Desk Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia. This investigation of the materials helped reveal the methods and techniques of the original makers, and helped provide evidence towards the correct authentication. It also helped with the process of using traditional methods to create large fills. A full case study of the conservation treatment will be presented to discuss this investigation and the results of using traditional materials as part of the treatment.

Speakers
CB

Claire Burns

Pre-Program Furniture Conservation Intern, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
CLAIRE BURNS received her bachelor’s degree in Art Conservation Studies at Marist College. She is currently a pre-program conservation intern in the Furniture and Frames Conservation Lab at the MFA, Boston. Previously she has interned as a pre-program conservation intern at the... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) A Collaborative Model for Rock Art Conservation in the Algerian Desert
Algeria, the biggest country in North Africa with an area over 2 million square kilometers, has seven stunning UNESCO World Heritage sites. Among them are the earliest prehistorical sites in North Africa: the Oldwayen site of Ain el-Hanech, 1.8 million years BC. The area is enormous and it is difficult to administer effective long-term site management, preservation, and preventative measures. Not only are these cultural heritage sites threatened by extreme weather and climate, but human intervention, looting, vandalism, and terrorism. In order to protect these vast heritage sites, in the mid 2000s the Algerian authorities created the “Algerian Cultural Parks Projects” in partnership with the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and executed by the Algerian Ministry of Culture. This launched a preventative conservation project applying a new model of local partnerships with Tuoareg and other tribal elders and stakeholders. 
Contained in this centralized Cultural Parks System are five major sites. Park of l’Ahaggar – over 633,000 km2; Tassili N’Ajjer Park – over 138,000 km2; Tindouf – over 168,000 km2; Atlas Saharian Park – over 63,000 km2; and Touat Gourarar Tidikelt Park – over 38,000 km2. The most important cultural heritage in this desert designation is the rock art. There are literally thousands of paintings and engravings out in the open, as well as sheltered in caves. They include masterpieces from the earliest period of art in the Sahara, the Large Wild Fauna Period. These life-size engravings of elephant, rhino, hippo, giraffe, and buffalo show a time when the Sahara was green and fertile. 
Conservation management in the Park of Ahaggar focused on the sites closest to roads and human communities, and then radiated out to the remote regions, often several days’ camel or jeep ride away. Preservation work commenced with detailed inventories including images, GPS, and narrative descriptions. For all the conservation surveys and routine checks, the Park recruited guides among the local population, namely the Touaregs. This detailed inventory work in remote regions was only possible with the collaboration and expertise of these partners, who are very familiar with the sites, locations, and routes. Most importantly, the communities and nomadic groups trust the guides; they often speak the same dialects, thereby facilitating a level of trust, access, and reliable information. The exchange of knowledge was two-way; the local Tuoareg elders and guides’ knowledge of the terrain, history, and symbolism of the sites was a rich resource that was documented as well. As archeological conservators, we were able to provide monitoring guidelines, compile massive data inventories, prioritize conservation site needs, and introduce an acceptable level of outside management to these sites. The relationships continue, as the guides serve on the “frontline” identifying areas of need and alerting archeological managers. This partnership has allowed for a much higher success in the protection of remote sites and movable cultural heritage, by developing a model based on trust, which has enabled government and university experts to work closely with local stewards. 

Speakers
avatar for Hakim Bouakkache

Hakim Bouakkache

Assistant Professor, University of Constantine, Algeria
Hakim Bouakkache is an assistant professor at the University of Constantine, in the department of archaeology and conservation, who helped design and build the collaborative conservation model for desert heritage sites. He worked at the National Museum Bardo in Algiers, and studi... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Julia M Brennan-[PA]

Julia M Brennan-[PA]

Owner, Textile Conservation Services / Caring For Textiles
Julia M. Brennan is a textile conservator based in Washington, DC. She has a passion for textiles, Asia, preserving heritage for our children and great greats, and teaching people how to care for their own cultural heritage.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Book and Paper) Cocktails and mixers: Ethanol-modified treatments for iron-gall ink.
Cocktails and mixers: Ethanol-modified treatments for iron-gall ink.
The admixture of ethanol to aqueous treatment solutions is commonly used by conservators to mitigate the solubility of water-sensitive media. Prior research and direct observations by Library of Congress conservators have likewise indicated promising applications for the addition of ethanol to treat manuscripts with water-sensitive iron-gall ink. Building on the pioneering research initiated by the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, which demonstrated the efficacy of calcium phytate and calcium bicarbonate to significantly slow the deteriorative mechanisms of iron-gall ink, a team of conservators and scientists at the Library of Congress sought the identify effective "cocktails", or ratios of ethanol and other components in the preparation of phytate and bicarbonate solutions.
This talk will present the results of a multi-year study comparing treatments on artificially-aged iron-gall ink, including washing in ethanol-water mixtures; varying proportions of ethanol in phytate and bicarbonate solutions; comparing ethanol-modified magnesium phytate with ethanol-modified calcium phytate; and ethanol-modified magnesium phytate at different pH values and solution concentrations. The presentation will also discuss the impact of the research on future treatment choices and procedures for iron-gall ink on paper.
Authors in Publication Order: Julie Biggs, Lynn Brostoff, Andrew Davis, Claire Dekle, Cyntia Karnes, Yasmeen Khan, Susan Peckham, and Cindy Connelly Ryan

Speakers
avatar for Julie Biggs-[PA]

Julie Biggs-[PA]

Senior Paper Conservator, Library of Congress
Julie Biggs is currently a Senior Paper Conservator at the Library of Congress. Previously, she worked at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. and as a freelance conservator in Washington D.C. and in Rome, Italy. Julie has developed an expertise in the conservation o... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lynn Brostoff

Lynn Brostoff

Senior Research Scientist, Library of Congress
Lynn Brostoff has a Masters in Materials Science from the University of Cincinnati, and a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Lynn has worked as a conservation scientist for over 25 years at leading institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum o... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Davis

Andrew Davis

Chemist, Library of Congress
Dr. Andrew Davis is a chemist and polymer scientist in the Library of Congress’s Preservation Research and Testing Division. He is currently involved in work to analyze the Library’s various paper and polymer collections, with the goal of correlating fundamental polymer prope... Read More →
avatar for Claire Dekle

Claire Dekle

Senior Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Claire Dekle is a Senior Book Conservator at the Library of Congress. Her experience as a conservation liaison to the Manuscript Division of the Library, as well as her treatment responsibilities, rekindled an early interest in the conservation of iron-gall ink. She was a member... Read More →
avatar for Cyntia Karnes-[PA]

Cyntia Karnes-[PA]

Paper Conservator, Art Gallery of Ontario
Cyntia Karnes is a Paper Conservator at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada, where she also has a private conservation practice. Previously she was a Senior Paper Conservator at the Library of Congress, following positions at the National Gallery of Art in D.C., and the... Read More →
avatar for Yasmeen Khan

Yasmeen Khan

Senior Rare Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Yasmeen Khan is a Senior Book Conservator in the Conservation Division of the Library of Congress where she has worked since 1996 She has a BA in Middle Eastern Studies from Barnard College, and an MLIS from the University of Texas with an Advanced Certificate in the Conservation... Read More →
avatar for Susan Peckham-[PA]

Susan Peckham-[PA]

Senior Paper Conservator, Library of Congress
Susan Peckham is a Senior Paper Conservator at the Library of Congress where she has worked for twelve years and enjoys acting as conservation liaison to the Prints and Photographs and Music Divisions. Previously, she worked for the National Archives and Records Administration, S... Read More →
avatar for Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Preservation Specialist, Library of Congress
Cindy Connelly Ryan is a staff member in the Preservation Research and Testing Division of the Library of Congress. Her research areas have included accelerated aging methods, assessment of zeolites in archival housing, paper splitting, iron gall ink stabilization, alteration of... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA
  • Audience Track Book and Paper
  • Cost Type Included with registration
  • Abstract ID 13678
  • Authors (in order) Julie Biggs, Lynn Brostoff, Andrew Davis, Claire Dekle, Cyntia Karnes, Yasmeen Khan, Susan Peckham, and Cindy Connelly Ryan

3:00pm

(Electronic Media) Conservation Surveys for Time-based Media Art Collections
Collection surveys provide data to enable conservators to mitigate risks to art collections and to set priorities for item-level conservation going forward. Collection surveys are an essential tool to identify works with urgent needs, but assessing an entire collection of time-based media artworks can be daunting. These collections can exhibit great variations: obsolescent analog and digital videos; a multiplicity of film types, file-based works on optical media or hard drives; multi-channel projections/installations; software-based works; and works relying upon networks or databases, to name a few. Collection surveys typically focus primarily on environmental factors and item condition. However, with time-based media an depth-in examination of each individual artwork may not be feasible within the parameters of a survey. Common risks to time-based media art are material characteristics (such as inherent tape deterioration or the fragility of emulsion or substrates), and internal/external dependencies (such as obsolescence of critical equipment, software or communication protocols). While works in a collection may seem very disparate, a majority of works will fall into general categories that share at least some of the same risks. For example, multi-channel video works of a certain era likely use the same synchronizing devices. This session will propose categories that support the identification of works with shared risks and needs, drawing on an understanding of material characteristics, processes within a work, and artists’ working methods. Also, another historical emphasis of surveys – on environmental conditions and traditional storage practices – is not sufficient to identify risks. Time-based media artworks are increasingly created digitally, and digital holdings grow as older analog media are migrated to files for preservation. These artworks have not meshed easily with collection management and art handling practices, and in many cases are not given the same care as other art objects. New and reshaped museum systems are needed, and an examination of existing systems can be equally as important as the examination of the artworks themselves. Thus a survey should include information-gathering in areas such as descriptive systems and metadata management, the management of hardware and software, and the adequacy of digital storage systems. Taken together, the individual and systemic risks can then be weighed to develop a plan of action for the collection as a whole.

Speakers
avatar for Mona Jimenez

Mona Jimenez

Media Art Conservator, Materia Media
Mona Jimenez is a media conservator and educator who has worked with time-based media art since the late 1980s. In 1993, Jimenez became the director of Media Alliance, one of two organizations in the US (along with the Bay Area Video Coalition) that were instrumental in creating... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Objects) Manganese Stain Reduction on an Ancient Greek Terracotta Vase
A 5th century BCE Greek red-figure terracotta pelike (jar) at the Harvard Art Museums exhibited areas of black manganese dioxide staining from burial. In addition to ceramics, these black stains are found on bone, glass and stone. They are not considered harmful to the object and are often left as part of its archaeological history. The disfiguring staining on this particular ceramic made interpretation of the painted design difficult necessitating treatment. Studies have been published on reducing manganese staining from glass, but very little was found for ceramics. Thus, a research project was undertaken to develop a safe method to reduce the manganese staining. A variety of treatment techniques were investigated including Nd:YAG and Er:YAG laser cleaning, and application of a range of chemicals by swabs and poultices. The latter was deemed the most promising option and a variety of poulticing materials, chelators and reducing agents were investigated. To avoid testing on the pelike itself, treatment options were evaluated first on terracotta mock-ups with artificial manganese staining and then on an ancient terracotta plate fragment with archaeological manganese staining. Based on the results, treatment was carried out on the pelike using a poultice of bentonite clay with 80:20 deionized water:ethanol. Bentonite is mostly sodium or calcium montmorillonite but also contains minor amounts of other minerals. It was chosen because it has a high ion exchange capacity (80-150 meq/100g) and thus was able to break the stain’s bond to the ceramic. After the poultice was applied, allowed to slowly dry and removed, a cotton swab dampened in water reduced the manganese staining. Because ethanol is a less effective solvent than water for soluble salts, it replaced a portion of water to minimize the amount of salts brought to the surface during treatment. The 80:20 ratio proved to be the most efficient at preventing the majority of salts while maintaining bentonite’s ability to reduce the staining. The thickness and the water content (Water content (Wc) = weight water/weight dry poultice) of the poultices were critical factors. Poultices used for effective treatment were about 3 mm thick with a Wc of approximately 5. If the poultice was too thin or the liquid content too low, the poultice dried quickly and was ineffective. The manganese staining was characterized by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS). SEM-EDS, XPS and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyze the bentonite poultice and the manganese stained terracotta before and after treatment. Results showed that the terracotta surface was unchanged and no bentonite was left behind. XPS analysis enabled identification of the manganese species present on the terracotta before treatment. The treatment of the pelike significantly reduced the manganese staining and achieved the desired outcome of a clearer interpretation of the painted design. The results of this research project can inform future treatments of manganese stained ceramics.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Costello-[PA]

Susan Costello-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects and Sculpture, Harvard Art Museums
Susan Costello received her MS from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. After graduating, she completed fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Worcester Art Museum. Currently, she is an associate conservator of objects and sculpture at the H... Read More →

Co-Authors
KE

Katherine Eremin

Patricia Cornwell Senior Conservation Scientist, Harvard Art Museums
Katherine Eremin is the Patricia Cornwell Senior Conservation Scientist at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies/Harvard Art Museums. She previously worked as an inorganic scientist at the National Museums of Scotland and received her PhD in 1994 from the Unive... Read More →
avatar for Georgina Rayner

Georgina Rayner

Associate Conservation Scientist, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at the Harvard Art Museums
Georgina Rayner is an Associate Conservation Scientist at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at the Harvard Art Museums. She was previously the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Conservation Science at the same institution and has a PhD in Polymer Chem... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Paintings) Material Insights and Challenges in the Treatment of Maarten de Vos’ "Portrait of a Woman"
Material analysis was crucial in treating Portrait of an Old Woman by Maarten de Vos (National Gallery of Art, Washington). During varnish removal the extent of overpaint became apparent; non-invasive and invasive analytical methods were used to determine its composition and distribution. Micro-sample analysis of the background and sitter’s hat revealed non-original materials: a discolored drying-oil layer (characterized by FTIR and GCMS); at least two layers of oil-based overpaint covering the hat; and at least three layers of oil-based overpaint covering the background. Stratigraphy revealed in cross sections guided decisions regarding treatment in these areas. The non-original oil layer was key to successful overpaint removal, providing a barrier between original and overpaint. More challenging was determining the extent of overpaint on the sitter’s black garment. Microscopic visual examination of the paint surface showed clear evidence of overpaint: a coarse-textured dark paint layer traversing cracks and damage in the underlying paint. A cross-section taken from the garment revealed two dark paint layers without intervening varnish or oil layer. The upper layer (the coarse dark overpaint noted above) was rich in smalt as determined by PLM and SEM-EDX (Si, Co, As, Ni identified). This layer also contains earth pigments (Fe) and small amounts of lead white (Pb). The lower layer did not contain smalt and had larger amounts of lead white and earths with traces of umber (Pb, Fe, Mn). To determine the extent of the dark, smalt-rich overpaint compared to the original paint, X-ray fluorescence imaging spectroscopy was performed. The co-localization of cobalt, arsenic, and nickel in the XRF maps indicated the presence of smalt across the garment. Smalt original to the painting was also present on the right side of the background. However, interestingly, the ratio of nickel to cobalt showed the smalt used in the background had a higher Ni content compared to that found in the garment, suggesting two different sources of smalt were used. XRF maps of Co, As and Ni have distributions that relate to the surface design of the garment; however, XRF maps of Pb, Fe, and Mn show a different design that may relate more to the lower, original paint layer identified in the cross-section. The inclusion of smalt in the overpaint, rare after the seventeenth century, suggests it was an early intervention. Subsequently, tests were undertaken to remove the overpaint from the garment. It was challenging, however, to see a clear separation between the overpaint and the original layer, and it was ultimately decided that full removal imparted too much risk. The dark overpaint was reduced slightly in some areas, and any discontinuities between overpaint and exposed original paint were compensated during retouching. The treatment of Portrait of a Woman offers an example of the important role analytical and imaging techniques play before and during treatment in identifying original versus non-original materials and making informed treatment decisions. By the same token, this project highlights the humbling physical limitations of treatment options that conservators often encounter despite having a thorough understanding of materials.

Speakers
avatar for Kari Rayner

Kari Rayner

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation, National Gallery of Art
Kari Rayner is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Kari graduated with her Master’s Degree in Art History and Certificate in Art Conservation from New York University in 2015 and interned at the Hamilton Kerr Ins... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for John Delaney

John Delaney

Senior Imaging Scientist, National Gallery of Art
John K. Delaney, Ph.D. is the Senior Imaging Scientist at the National Gallery of Art, where his research focuses on the development and application of remote sensing imaging methods for the study of works of art.
avatar for Kathryn Dooley

Kathryn Dooley

Research Scientist, National Gallery of Art
Kate Dooley is a Research Scientist in the Scientific Research Department at the National Gallery of Art and is interested in the spectroscopic identification and mapping of materials and chemical imaging methods. She graduated with her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of M... Read More →
avatar for E. Melanie Gifford-[Fellow]

E. Melanie Gifford-[Fellow]

Research Conservator for Painting Technology, National Gallery of Art
E. Melanie Gifford is a Research Conservator for Painting Technology at the National Gallery of Art where she uses technical analysis to consider the artistic decision-making process of Dutch and Flemish painters. She trained in art conservation at the Cooperstown Graduate Progra... Read More →
avatar for Michael Palmer

Michael Palmer

Conservation Scientist, National Gallery of Art
Michael Palmer received his graduate training in botany from the University of Maryland in 1979. From 1980-1985 he held the position of wood researcher at Winterthur Museum and also taught in the conservation training program. Mr. Palmer joined the National Gallery of Art in 1985... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Risk assessment in the storage environment of the photographic collections of the National Dance Museum in Cuba
The National Museum of Dance in Cuba has an extensive collection of photographs in different techniques and formats that amounts to a little more than 5,000 photographs of the history of dance in Cuba. These photographs mainly capture the artistic trajectory of Prima Ballerina Assoluta Alicia Alonso in her more than 60 years of performance as a dancer. This extensive collection has never been previously diagnosed and documented. The aims of our study was to carry out an integral diagnosis of the collection using the PHOTODIAGNOS method developed by the Institute of History of Cuba and an evaluation of the risks of deterioration during a year of study (2016) that would allow to establish an efficient risk management to guarantee a preventive conservation strategy sustainable. During the year 2016, studies were carried out to know the thermohygrometric quality of the repository where the collection is stored using thermohigrographe calibrated weekly by an Ashman psychrometer, as well as the application of the Re-ORG methodology designed by ICCROM-UNESCO to determine the actual needs of the storage system and an environmental fungal monitoring (air and dust) using the sedimentation methods proposed by Omeliansky and an impaction method using a Super SAS-100 biocolector. The use of these aerobiological sampling methodologies allowed us to compare the effectiveness of both methods and to determine the most reliable methodology to carry out environmental microbiological quality studies in indoor environments of our museums. The ecological criteria, relative density (RD) and relative frequency (RF) were determined. In the isolated fugi, the capacity to degrade cellulose, starch and protein as well as the excretion of pigments and organic acids were determined qualitatively. The results of the study allowed determining that the collection presents a regular state of integral conservation although the environment and conditions of storage are not the recommended ones for this kind of collection. The principal affectations detected were a tendency to curl, damages in corner area, some mechanical damages to the surface and silver mirror. Fluctuations and high levels of relative humidity and temperature were detected, as well as a microbiologically contaminated environment in some months of the year, mainly during the dry season, with fungal concentrations that exceed the 500 CFU/m3, which were positively correlated with RH (p≤0.05). There was evidence of fungal diversity in this ecosystem. Genera Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Penicillium, internationality reported as significant biodeteriorants of photographs and primaries colonizers of paper, were predominant according to its RF and RD in the repository. There is too a high deposition of dust with a high concentration of associated fungal that, together with the low microbial quality of the local air, represent a significant risk of fungal biodeterioration for the collection. This study allowed us to draw up a risk management strategy that guarantees the physical stability and quality of the image of this important photographic collection that we intend to integrate into the Memory of the World.

Speakers
avatar for Yuniesky Becerra Becerra

Yuniesky Becerra Becerra

Conservator, National Museum of Dance (Cuba)
Specialist in conservation restoration of works of art in substrate paper by the UNESCO Chair of the National Center for Conservation, Restoration and Museology with 8 years of experience in the conservation and restoration of documents in differents museums of Havana, Cuba as th... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Julio César Rodríguez García

Julio César Rodríguez García

Teacher and Assistant researcher, Center for Conservation, Restoration and Museology Studies, University of the Arts, Cuba
Specialist in Biodeterioration and Preventive Conservation of Cultural Heritage. Bachelor in Biology and Master in Microbiology from the Faculty of Biology of the University of Havana with more than 15 years of experience in scientific research and university teaching related to... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) The Norwich textile reference database, a collections care project
The city of Norwich, United Kingdom still produces beautiful and high-quality woolen textiles, although its heyday was between the 14th and 19th centuries. As a result of this active textile industry, garments and fabrics are found in numerous textile collections around the globe. In spite of its importance, information regarding dyes, mordants and technologies associated with dying practices in the city remain scarce. During the second half of the 18th century, when the trade of raw materials and finished goods was commonplace, merchant manufacturers used pattern books and cards containing textile swatches to facilitate sales and trade. Some of these outstandingly well-preserved pattern books survive. After thorough ethical conversations, a dye-and-mordant database incorporating chromatographic and spectroscopic data is being generated using samples from these pattern books. High-performance liquid chromatography – photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence (XRF), has allowed us to identify distinctive dye and mordant combinations, which, in parallel with collaborative historical and archival research, is aiding in understanding the industry’s practices. More importantly, this will ultimately support collections care by providing sound scientific information related to textiles’ constituent material properties, such as light and moisture sensitivity of certain color components.

Speakers
avatar for Jocelyn Alcantara Garcia

Jocelyn Alcantara Garcia

Assistant Professor, University of Delaware - Department of Art Conservation
Jocelyn Alcántara-García joined the University of Delaware in the fall of 2014 after working for about five years in interdisciplinary projects (predominantly in Mexico, where she was born, but also in the Czech Republic and Spain). All projects were conducted in close collabor... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Michael Nix

Michael Nix

Independent Textile and Maritime Historian
Michael Nix obtained his PhD in maritime history at the Department of English Local History, Leicester University in 1991. He worked as the Research Manager for Transport and Technology in Major Projects and Research, Glasgow Museums, and has published books, papers and articles... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:00pm

(Wooden Artifacts) Thomas Sheraton's Red Oil
Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TBA

3:30pm

3:30pm

1. (Research and Technical Studies) An American Icon in Plastic: The Technical Analysis, Study, & Treatment of a Early Edition 1959 Barbie
An early edition (c. 1959) polyvinyl chloride Barbie™ doll afflicted with bleeding autograph ink and white leg efflorescence was studied with chemical analysis and computed tomography to understand her construction and symptoms. Comparison with a second Barbie™ of slightly later manufacture (c. 1960) shows how the early design of Mattel’s flagship toy was refined including a shift from all-PVC construction to body parts of different plastics and associated changes in mold design. Contrary to a more frequently encountered “sticky leg syndrome,” wherein plasticizer migrates from the PVC to the surface as a tacky liquid, this doll exhibited a waxy white stearate bloom from the mid-thighs to the ankles. In addition, the doll was autographed by Ruth Handler, the original designer of BarbieTM and a cofounder of the Mattel Corporation. Her signature and the date are now barely legible, as the once sharp lines of ink have migrated within the PVC plastic. The dolls were imaged with computed tomography, multi-spectral imaging, and X-radiography, and the composition of their component parts was discerned with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Collectively, this information helped the team decide whether the compound exuding from the 1959 doll’s legs has an ongoing function in the plastic, whether its utility was limited to the manufacturing phase, and whether it will recur. Once the stearate was identified, the decision to treat or remove the waxy bloom from the Barbie™ could be rationalized and achieved.

Speakers
avatar for Odile Madden

Odile Madden

Senior Scientist, The Getty Conservation Institute
Odile Madden is Senior Scientist and leader of the Modern and Contemporary Art Research Initiative at The Getty Conservation Institute. Prior to joining the GCI, she was Research Scientist at the Smithsonian’s Museum Conservation Institute where she developed a modern materials... Read More →

Co-Authors
MB

Morgan Burgess

Conservation Graduate Student, UCLA/Getty Conservation MA Program
Morgan Burgess graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2012 with a BA in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History and a minor in Studio Art. She was introduced to conservation as an undergraduate at the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project: Poggio Colla Field School where... Read More →
avatar for Marci Jefcoat Burton

Marci Jefcoat Burton

Graduate Student, UCLA/Getty Master’s Program
Marci Jefcoat Burton is a graduate student in the UCLA/Getty Conservation of Archeological and Ethnographic Materials program and is currently completing her third year curriculum internship (2017 - 2018) with the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology... Read More →
DH

David Hunt

Physical / Forensic Anthropologist, D-ABFA, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
David Hunt is a physical and forensic anthropologist and archaeologist specializing in mortuary analysis and the curation of skeletal remains. He is the physical anthropology collections manager at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History where he oversees... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

10. (Book and Paper) (Un)Finished Thoughts: Approaches to Conserving Transitory States in the Working Documents of Gwendolyn Brooks
Starting with their earliest lessons in book binding history, most library conservators become familiar with the notion of “temporary” or “incomplete” bindings over the course of their careers. These volumes—which have been unceremoniously sewn or stitched into a wrapper, or else tacketed into an inexpensive and utilitarian cover—are destined to wait ad infinitum for a full and finished binding that may have at one time been promised, but will truly never come. Temporary bindings often are a cause for consternation when considering treatment, since they are usually quite old (dating from anytime between the 15th to the 19th century), don’t include high quality materials, and rarely have a particularly robust level of protection for their text blocks. One nice feature of the temporary binding, however, is that at least its printed content is typically complete, representing a finished intellectual work which has been released for consumption into the world—however shabby its exterior may be. But, what if the intellectual work was unfinished? What if the value of a document stemmed from its lack of finality, the fact that it was paused forever, mid-thought, mid-sentence? What if it was, in fact, the content and not the form that was “incomplete”? The last half-decade has given rise to a codified genre of "transitory" art—a visual documentation of our modern societies in flux. For much longer, we have relied heavily on “transitory documents”—works that capture our thoughts in a moment of generation, transition, evolution or solidification. These works, too, can often be found on the bench of library conservators. Whether it is in the form of a hand written draft of a famous work, a private notebook or planner, or a historic document repurposed to make a brand new edition, preserving “working documents” in a state of perpetual incompleteness requires a shift in traditional conservation approach. The primary challenge of the conservation of “working documents” is that they have multifaceted material characteristics that make a straight path towards a traditional treatment impossible. What do you do with and 16th century imprint cut apart and re-arranged by an 18th century scholar? Composition books are cheap and accessible vessels for the thoughts of poets, but how do you repair a minimal binding in the process of failing without obfuscating the intentional damage inflicted by its creator? Moreover, when treating objects that are both archival and ephemeral (still without being archived ephemera), to what degree do you camouflage the conservation work that you do and what do you reveal? If called upon to stabilize a "working document" that has clearly had a long career, how do you strike a balance between access and authenticity? Though the questions raised by this category of object are complex and endless, this presentation will aim to consider the possible answers through treatment case studies completed on equally complex--if not infinitely interesting--objects from the collections of the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Quinn Morgan Ferris

Quinn Morgan Ferris

Senior Conservator for Special Collections, University of Illinois
Quinn Morgan Ferris is the Senior Conservator for Special Collections at the University of Illinois Library at Urbana-Champaign. She started at the U of I as the Rare Book Conservator in 2016. Quinn is a graduate of New York University's Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Cente... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

11. (Archaeological Conservation) Conservation in a Changing Climate: Examining the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Submerged Wooden Artifacts
Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is not only one of the leading factors of global warming, but also one of the leading contributors to continuing ocean acidification. The historic average for ocean pH is 8.2, but since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, this has decreased to 8.1. It is projected to reach a pH of 7.6 by 2100 if current concentration trends continue. Much research has been done by biologists and nature conservationists to address the effects this acidification could have on sea life. However, little research has been conducted on the effects ocean acidification has and could increasingly have on the degradation of underwater archaeological sites and remains. This study examines the effects of increased acidification on the preservation of waterlogged wooden artifacts, by examining sample degradation using SEM after prolonged submergence in solutions of varying acidities. These solutions are prepared to match the pH levels of past, present, and projected oceanic conditions. The study focuses on the effects of increased ocean acidity on woods commonly used in historic ship construction, specifically oak, cedar, and pine. It also draws on published climate projections to identify areas where sites are most at risk of increased degradation due to ocean acidification.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

12. (Textiles) A preliminary evaluation of lining and surface patching techniques for doped aircraft fabric
Doped fabric is ubiquitous on historic aircraft found in the collection at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Doping is the practice of applying a waterproof coating to fabric, which also serves to shrink the material over a rigid structure. A doped surface is traditionally made of multiple coats of clear cellulose nitrate, acetate, and/or acetate butyrate applied over a cotton or linen fabric. These cellulosic resins, known as aircraft dope, have a limited usable lifespan once applied to flight surfaces as dictated by their material properties. As these resins age, they become brittle and shrink, sometimes cracking or splitting in the process. Because of the requirement for scheduled inspections of the structures beneath, doped fabric materials have long been considered dispensable and are expected to be replaced or patched during routine operational maintenance or restoration. Restoration practices for patching localized damage entails the application of patches with new dope according to strictly defined methods illustrated in the FAA Advisory, AC43.13. This irreversible application of new dope can lead to further damage to the surrounding areas as the fresh dope shrinks. Traditional restoration practices can compromise the authenticity of the aircraft through the re-fabrication, removal, or covering of battle damage, historic finishes, and original art. Alternative options to preserve original doped aircraft fabric in situ through lining and surface patching techniques require further research as these topics are not well published in the field of conservation. NASM conservation is currently deviating from long-established restoration protocols to develop new methods to preserve original fabrics. New processes being explored include full lining of fabric components and employing localized patches using conservation fabrics and adhesives. Visible surface patching from the exterior is necessary in many instances due to constraints of the aircraft structure. In cases where lining is required, it provides much needed support to damaged and structurally weakened doped fabric. Over the last two years, NASM conservation treatments of aircraft fabric included the application of surface patches with nylon gossamer and Lascaux 498 HV and full lining of doped fabrics with BEVA 371b onto Ceconite 102 (a polyester fabric). This poster assesses these past treatments and explores two additional adhesives (methylcellulose and a wheat starch paste/sturgeon glue blend) as potential surface patching materials. The patching and lining materials were tested using t-peel and lap/shear tests as evaluation tools to determine adhesive/bond strength. The goal of this research is to identify reversible and stable materials and techniques to replace traditional methods of restoration.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Gottschlich

Lauren Gottschlich

Objects Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Gottschlich graduated with a BA from the University of Mary Washington with majors in art history, studio art, and historic preservation. She received her MS from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation majoring in objects conservation and minorin... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

13. (Research and Technical Studies) Sticking with it: Following up on HSC’s effort to develop a user-driven adhesives database
This past fall, the Heritage Science for Conservation group at Johns Hopkins University hosted a one day workshop, Adhesives in Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Industry and Conservators, with the aim of gathering information from participants towards developing a user-driven adhesives database. Through talks and break-out groups, intentions around data and functionality desired in an adhesives database were discussed. Two surveys were administered, one before and one after the workshop, that gathered data on different aspects of adhesives selection and use in conservation. These results were paired with the data gathered at the workshop to inform database design and implementation. The details of the workshop, survey results, and next steps are presented here.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Hall

Andrea Hall

Senior Research Specialist, Heritage Science for Conservation, Department of Conservation and Preservation, Sheridan Libraries and Museums, Johns Hopkins University
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation t... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Molly K. McGath

Molly K. McGath

Andrew W. Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow, Heritage Science for Conservation, Department of Conservation and Preservation, Sheridan Libraries and Museums, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. Molly K. McGath is an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Heritage Science for Conservation within the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University with research focused on environmental monitoring, evaluation of past conservation treatments and... Read More →
avatar for Patricia McGuiggan

Patricia McGuiggan

Research Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. McGuiggan obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. During her Ph.D., she was a research scholar in the Applied Mathematics Department at the Australian National University working with Richard Pashley. She spent 3 years as a postdoctoral fe... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

14. (Research and Technical Studies) Gamma Radiation of Cultural Heritage in Disaster Response
Disaster Preparedness Planning requires knowledge of the materials in a collection, their value, and information on the best treatments available. Often, treatments can only mitigate damage done to collections, following a disaster. In some instances, there are few options and treatment only allows for a window of time when the materials can then be digitized, or otherwise documented. The degree of damage, the size of the collection impacted, or the urgency of the disaster may require the use of techniques that otherwise are not typically used within the field. The use of such methods is exceptional and, as such, requires scientific investigation before the treatment needs to be used. This project addresses one such emergency treatment: the use of gamma radiation, and its immediate effects on materials within archive and paper-based collections. A set of surrogate materials was treated with gamma radiation to test how this treatment affects the materials. Colorimetry and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to discern if the materials underwent chemical change, and to discern which materials underwent the most change.

Speakers
avatar for Molly K. McGath

Molly K. McGath

Andrew W. Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow, Heritage Science for Conservation, Department of Conservation and Preservation, Sheridan Libraries and Museums, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. Molly K. McGath is an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Heritage Science for Conservation within the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University with research focused on environmental monitoring, evaluation of past conservation treatments and... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Jenn Foltz Cruickshank

Jenn Foltz Cruickshank

Conservator, Maryland State Archives
Jenn Foltz Cruickshank is a Conservator at the Maryland State Archives (MSA) in Annapolis, Maryland, starting in 1998, when she began as a conservation technician. She specializes in paper artifacts and photographs, custom rehousing and mounting solutions, pest management, and em... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Hall

Andrea Hall

Senior Research Specialist, Heritage Science for Conservation, Department of Conservation and Preservation, Sheridan Libraries and Museums, Johns Hopkins University
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation t... Read More →
avatar for Patricia McGuiggan

Patricia McGuiggan

Research Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. McGuiggan obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. During her Ph.D., she was a research scholar in the Applied Mathematics Department at the Australian National University working with Richard Pashley. She spent 3 years as a postdoctoral fe... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

15. (Textiles) Frass-tacular!: Textile Conservation Techniques Adapted to the Stabilization of Moth-Damaged Aircraft Fabric
Historic WWII bombers have not typically been the subject of innovative textile conservation treatments. However, a unique opportunity arose while the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) was evaluating 50 fabric panels used to insulate the Museum’s Martin B-26 Marauder, better known as Flak-Bait. This particular aircraft is most noteworthy for having flown over 200 successful missions during WWII and is one of the most authentic and historic aircraft in existence. The overall preservation goals for this aircraft are to stabilize as much original material as possible, reverse previous restoration efforts, and celebrate historic battle damage. The fabric panels that line the interior of Flak-Bait are only found in the front, or nose section of the aircraft. The majority of the panels are constructed from dyed fulled wool fabric, lined on the reverse with a thick layer of undyed cotton batting. This fabric structure is machine-sewn around a support border of perforated aluminum strips. Cadmium plated steel buttons are fed through the perforations in the aluminum boarder strips thereby securing the panels to the aircraft’s interior walls. The nose section of Flak Bait had been on display for forty years during which time the insulating fabric panels suffered a severe webbing clothes moth infestation, followed by a heavy-handed restoration to hide the moth damage. This earlier restoration effort utilized large adhesive-applied fabric patches to cover losses from moth damage that were then spray painted in-situ to match the surrounding fabric. Other condition issues affecting the textiles include embedded corrosion, light damage, accumulated frass, and areas of additional moth damage resulting in structural instability. This poster will serve as a case study of how textile conservation techniques were used to stabilize and aesthetically re-integrate original interior fabric panels that would otherwise have been completely replaced. The techniques employed include experimentation with rigid gels and C02 for adhesive reduction, needle- and wet-felted loss compensation, solvent cleaning for overpaint reduction and dry cleaning methods to remove frass. This poster will also discuss how the treatment decision-making process was influenced by a comprehensive understanding of these composite objects. The panels’ history, condition, range of materials and the proposed display environment influenced the treatment decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Meghann Kozak

Meghann Kozak

Engen Preprogram Conservation Fellow, National Air and Space Museum (NASM)
Meghann Kozak has an individualized B.A. concentrating in Chemistry, Critical Art Theory, Studio Art, and Art History with a minor in French Language from New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. Since receiving her degree, Kozak has been continuously gain... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

16. (Textiles) Using SEM to Examine Metal Threads from the King's Bed (1672) at Knole House
This research report presents the results of a morphologic and compositional study of 4 different metal threads set-aside after a 1974-87 wet cleaning. These threads are from the ‘King’s Bed’, a late 17th century royal bed, now at Knole in Kent, England. Although the ‘King’s Bed’ is not currently in need of cleaning or restoration, analysis of the Knole House threads should help in determining the best plan for future conservation treatment. The threads were examined via SEM-EDS to confirm their elemental composition and morphology and provide an update on their condition. Multiple readings, both point and box field, were taken on each sample with an effort to sample all places that looked different (dark, light, scratched, edge, field…). The surface on the gold gilded samples was scratched and exhibited varying degrees of brightness. For these areas, multiple points on each sample were tested and the surface ‘mapped’ along lines to investigate if the composition varied between bright and dull areas or if corrosion products could be detected. Also a cross-sectional sample was prepared to investigate, if possible, the thickness of the gilded layer. Some readings at 10 and 7 kV were also attempted on the gold gilded surfaces in an effort to see if this could also give any insight into the thickness of the gilded layer. All threads were silver; one solid, and 3 with metal foil wrapped silk cores. The solid silver thread showed tooling striations indicating manufacturing by drawing, while high gold readings suggested possible gold gilding. The other treads were of cut metal foil wrapped about silk cores. However, their surface striations suggested different manufacturing methods. Attempts (including cross sections and low kV readings) were made to determine the thickness of the gold gilding while the EDS line-mapping tool helped correlate visual evidence with elemental composition. It was hoped that more information could be gleaned about corrosion products, but the threads appeared very clean, with scant evidence of either dust/dirt or Ag2S or AgCl corrosion products. No information was available on the detarnishing process 50 years ago. The very thin layers of gold gilding should be of interest as it is possible that the solid silver thread was gilded at one time. If so, this may have been removed during the previous cleaning. This SEM-EDS examination provided significant information on the manufacturing method and composition of the metal threads.

Speakers
avatar for Erin E. Murphy

Erin E. Murphy

Marshall Steel Fellow, Archaeological Conservation, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Marshall Steel Fellow, Archaleological Conservation at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Erin is a recent MA and MSc graduate from University College London where she studied general object conservation. During work at the Horniman Museum and Gardens in London she specialized... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

17. (Architecture) Challenges in Documenting Historic Finishes During Construction at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, MD
Enoch Pratt Library serves as a case study, demonstrating the challenges of completing time-pressure paint investigations in the midst of the construction phase. EverGreene was contracted to determine the original decorative scheme in seven spaces and rooms on the second floor of the library. Decorative finishes, particularly on a large scale project such as this, communicate with one another. Though the rooms are different, colors often overlap, and schemes and patterns can be repeated throughout to create a cohesion between rooms. At the Pratt Library, research and precise documentation became increasingly difficult as selective demolition and renovation activities created tremendous time pressures during the study. In addition to the current renovation project, many of the walls had been previously demolished, and ceilings were significantly perforated with post-historic mechanical systems and lighting. In some cases, it was impossible to review conditions to clarify issues raised during sample examination, and in-situ reveals had to be matched immediately, because the finishes would no longer exist shortly after they had been examined. Recommendations often had to be made on the spot, making client interest and interaction a key part of the process. Combining physical investigations with archival research, conservators were challenged to document colors and composition of stenciling as well as freehand decorative and figurative work on plaster walls and ceilings, even as ongoing demolition reduced the contextual evidence in historic spaces. Each new discovery revealed by the investigation added perspective to the design process, which was driven by a desire to honor the historic decoration while accommodating present-day aesthetic tastes. Keeping lines of communication open between the conservation team, the design team, and the building owner was crucial in the selection of colors and decorative motifs for the renovation process.

Speakers
avatar for Brooke W. Young Russell-[PA]

Brooke W. Young Russell-[PA]

Architectural Conservator, EverGreene Architectural Arts, Inc.
Brooke Young Russell is an Architectural Conservator and has been employed by EverGreene Architectural Arts since 2016. Brooke acquired her Masters of Science in Historic Preservation from Columbia University's GSAPP in 2013 and feels fortunate enough to exercise her love of pain... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

18. (Objects) The Use and Effect of Pickering Particle Emulsions and Cyclomethicone Cleaning Systems in the Treatment of Hair in Water-Sensitive Composite Objects
Keratinaceous materials, including animal hair, have long been used in the manufacture of utilitarian and art objects. The cleaning of composite objects constructed of hair attached to water-sensitive material now presents a challenge to conservators. In recent years Pickering particle emulsions and cyclomethicone have been used with great success in the cleaning and protecting of water-sensitive painted surfaces. Through a case study of the treatment of a 19th century hearth brush (1958.2326) from the Winterthur Museum collection, this research assesses the use of Velvesil™ Plus emulsions and D4 cyclomethicone, also known as D4 silicone solvent, in the aqueous cleaning of natural hair bristles attached to a wooden substrate. To test the effectiveness of Pickering particle emulsions and cyclomethicone in the treatment of hair, a soiled hair sample from the Winterthur hearth brush was trisected. One section was left uncleaned; a second cleaned with 10% deionized water in Velvesil™ Plus and D4 cyclomethicone and left unrinsed; and the third cleaned with the same solution and rinsed with D4 cyclomethicone. The three samples, representing the hair before, during, and after cleaning, were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy- energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), secondary electron imaging, and false color elemental mapping to asses the ability of the emulsion to remove embedded grime, to identify residual cleaning agents, and to visualize possible damage to the hair structure. Results showed the Velvesil™ Plus emulsion effectively cleaned the hair with minimal residues and no damage to the hair’s microstructure. The cleaning system was then applied in the treatment of the Winterthur hearth brush. The complete cleaning method included saturating the bristle bundles and wooden bristle board with silicone solvent to prevent the emulsion from absorbing into the wood and preventing the swelling and trapping of residues. The Velvesil™ Plus emulsion was then applied by brush and cosmetic sponge and rinsed from the surface with additional applications silicone solvent. This treatment method showed a drastic macroscopic improvement to the hair’s color, sheen, and pliability based on overall visual examination after treatment. A Pickering particle emulsion cleaning system combined with cyclomethicone masking of sensitive material is a promising method for the treatment of hair in composite objects, allowing for careful and controlled cleaning of soiled keratinaceous materials.

Speakers
avatar for Amaris Sturm

Amaris Sturm

NEH Graduate Fellow, Winterthur/ University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation; Walters Art Museum
Amaris Sturm is an NEH Graduate Fellow in the Winterthur/ University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation with a focus in archaeological objects conservation. Amaris earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art Conservation and Art History at the University of Delaware. Before star... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

19. (Objects) Cosmetics as artifacts: the analysis and conservation of a 1930s theatrical makeup kit
A 1930s era theatrical makeup kit in the collection the Buffalo Museum of Science was analyzed and treated at the Garman Family Art Conservation Department at Buffalo State College. The kit, contained within a tinplated-steel L. Leichner brand expandable makeup box, was tightly packed with 105 individual items that included: paper, metal, and glass containers of powder- and cream-based cosmetics that had broke, spilled and smeared; insect-eaten wool crepe hairs; makeup-stained cotton balls; degrading plastics; and paper documents, including a hand-written journal with notations made in lipstick. The kit was gifted to the museum in 1983, where it had since remained in storage. Discussions with the curator lead to the idea that the kit, while not typical of the museum’s collections, could nonetheless serve as an interesting launching-off point into science for visitors interested in cosmetics or the theatre. A treatment philosophy was developed that would approach the kit as an “archeological artifact,” with the goal of maintaining the kit’s original appearance as it was assembled by its owner. Materials analysis, treatment and preventive conservation strategies were employed in tandem to stabilize the object group for display and storage. Materials analysis was performed to gather information about the components of the make-up kit that could be used to inform decisions about treatment and display. Significantly, the box’s strong “old makeup” odor was considered a potential concern to both to the paper and metal components in the box and to other objects housed nearby it. The questions posed for the first phase of analysis were: what types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) comprise this strong “old makeup” smell? Could these components be problematic to other materials? In collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, solid-phase microextraction headspace analysis (HS-SPME) was performed on the unopened box and some components, to detect volatile and semi-volatile species present. In a second step, experiments to replicate a “low fi” approach to non-invasive VOC analysis were performed in the BSC science laboratory. Pellets of sorbents were tested for their ability to adsorb VOCs from a two strong off-gassing objects and low temperature pyrolysis was performed to desorb analytes for gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis (py-GC-MS). A third phase of analysis began with research into the history of theatrical cosmetics to lend context to the historical moment from which the items emerged. This is best emblematized by the greasepaints, the main group of objects in the kit and the precursor to modern-day foundation. To characterize colorants, six pink greasepaints in the kit were sampled for analysis that combined X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (transmission-FTIR), optical microscopy (OM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and selective py-GC-MS. In the treatment phase, extensive collaboration from across the BSC conservation department was solicited in order to approach a variety of object types including: mends to sprung three-dimensional paper containers filled with cosmetics, fills in broken glass jars, stabilization of a hand-written journal, and fabrication of missing metal components.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Wilcop

Mary Wilcop

Graduate Fellow, Buffalo State College
Mary Wilcop is a third-year graduate fellow in Objects Conservation at the Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department at the State University of New York College at Buffalo. Last summer, Mary was a graduate objects conservation intern at the Cleveland Museum of... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nathan Eddingsaas

Nathan Eddingsaas

Assistant Professor, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Rochester Institute of Technology
avatar for Jonathan Thornton

Jonathan Thornton

Professor of Objects Conservation, Buffalo State College
Jonathan Thornton has taught objects conservation at the Art Conservation Department since 1980. Following an earlier career as an artist/silversmith, he studied conservation in this department when it was still located in Cooperstown, NY, and received his M. A. and Certificate o... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

2. (Objects) Electroplated silver during a re-lacquering campaign at Winterthur: treatment and analytical insights
The Conservation of Silver and Copper Alloy Objects project is part of a multiphase institutional initiative to treat objects in Winterthur Museum’s diverse collections prioritized by greatest conservation need. Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library received IMLS funding to support a two-year project to remove aged or failed lacquer coatings, polish, and coat approximately 500 of its most vulnerable silver objects, to continue analytical research related to silver surface corrosion, and to commence new research on corrosion and coating issues. Most of the time tarnish is easily removed from a silver surface with a mild abrasive; however, polishing the silver in this way permanently removes the most superficial layer of the precious metal. This is commonly considered acceptable if the silver in question were to be lacquered, which would protect the object for up to 30 years by making aggressive polishing campaigns unnecessary. However, unlike silver, silver-plated objects have an extremely thin display surface of silver and a more substantial substrate of a base metal. Objects that have been electroplated are particularly prone to mistreatment as the precious metal display surface is merely atoms thick and can be removed during a single polishing campaign. For delicate electroplated surfaces, technicians at Winterthur have been using a newly developed acidified thiourea gel cleaning system. However, uncertainty regarding the efficacy of thiourea on a copper substrate has encouraged the IMLS team to research other methods for cleaning electroplated silver. Initial treatment results will be presented here. The silver-plating method employed on an object will likely determine the treatment of the surface. As a result, the Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory at Winterthur Museum has been conducting parallel research into ways of differentiating plate methods. ED-XRF (energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence) spectroscopy was performed to determine object elemental composition. Alpha and beta x-ray emission lines are absorbed differently by surrounding elements after emission: the deeper the element or the thicker the layer on top, the more the ratios are affected. In order to semi-quantify the thickness of the plate, Cu-K ratios were used to measure the absorption of these emission lines by the silver plate. For example, during cleaning tests performed on an Argand lampshade, the thinness of the silver film and the fact that it was easily removed by abrasive cleaning all indicated the presence of an electroplated film. By analyzing the XRF data in the aforementioned way, the shade showed a silver plate thickness of much less than 1 µm, which was clearly different in plating technique from the rim, the shade support and the Argand lamp body, which was already confirmed as Sheffield Plate. Electroplate is generally found to be much less than 5 µm, although can be built up to more. It was therefore found that XRF can be used to quickly and non-destructively gauge possible plating techniques. As more plated objects are analyzed as part of this project, a database will be accumulated in order to inform thickness variations across plating methods.

Speakers
TP

Tia Polidori

Conservation Technician, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Tia is a conservation technician working on a two-year IMLS grant at Winterthur recoating silver objects in the Winterthur collection.
KR

Katelyn Rovito

Conservation Technician, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Katie is a conservation technician working on a two-year IMLS grant at Winterthur recoating silver objects in the Winterthur collection.

Co-Authors
avatar for Rosie Grayburn

Rosie Grayburn

Associate Scientist, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Rosie is an Associate Scientist within the Conservation Department at Winterthur Museum.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

20. (Book and Paper) An In Depth Treatment Study of Humidification and Flattening in Paper Conservation
This presentation will provide an overview of an in depth study of humidification and flattening of paper based artworks/artifacts conducted during a Cathleen A. Baker Fellowship at the University of Michigan Library. Humidification and flattening of paper is one of the most fundamental components of a book and/or paper conservator’s practice, and while it may seem basic or rudimentary the finesse required when selecting the techniques, materials and methodologies to employee in a given situation should not be discounted. When it comes to determining the appropriate procedure for reducing planar distortions in a paper support Material Matters! Factors inherent to the paper itself including the fiber type, processing, sheet formation and finishing affect how the paper will react with the environment and in treatment; by isolating variables and using a standard set of sample papers that reflect a wide range of paper supports typically seen in museum, library and archival collections a more comprehensive understanding of the treatment process can be achieved. The primary aim of this project was to combine a through literature review with personal interviews with practicing conservators of various career levels and training backgrounds to formulate a series of practical experiments which would inform my personal knowledge of the subject. Comparative data- both quantitative and qualitative in nature- in the form of dimensional measurements, observations of surface texture and planarity and efficacy provide insight into manipulating the vast array of humidity delivery systems coupled with restraint drying set-ups to achieve the desired outcome. In the end there is no silver bullet, there is no one "go to" system that will work for all papers in all situations but there are ways to tailor most any system to achieve the goal for each paper.

Speakers
avatar for Kesha Talbert

Kesha Talbert

Associate Paper Conservator, Etherington Conservation Services
Kesha Talbert holds an M.A. in art conservation from Buffalo State College with a specialization in paper conservation and a B.A. in art conservation from the University of Delaware. She currently works at ECS Conservation a private conservation center specializing in book and pa... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

21. (Book and Paper) Mass Deacidification Carrier Fluid Selection to Protect Media
In order to build an alkaline reserve in paper that neutralizes acids already present and protects against acids adsorbed in the future, most mass deacidification processes use a liquid carrier to deliver alkaline particles or solutes. While certain mass deacidification carrier fluids in use today are inert, others are toxic, flammable, and odoriferous. A few significant carriers (heptane, HMDS) are industrial solvents capable of changing the appearance of susceptible media. Although vendors using more aggressive fluids screen collections for media compatibility, given the hundreds of thousands of artifacts undergoing mass deacidification yearly, we can expect loss of historic and artistic content. We have performed several experiments, taking thousands of measurements in the CIELAB color space to quantify the color change of an increasingly large number of relevant media (highlighters, stamp pad ink, colored pencils, markers) on relevant acidic (book and bond) papers. Measuring before and after mechanical action while submerged in relevant mass deacidification carrier fluids in use today (perfluorohexane isomers, heptane, and hexamethyldisiloxane—HMDS) gauges their susceptibility to color change during treatment. We concluded that perfluorinated hydrocarbons seldom if ever cause noticeable changes in color density of even of the most fugitive media. By contrast heptane and HMDS produce changes noticeable to the human eye. Therefore, carrier chemistry is an important though underappreciated criterion in the selection of mass deacidification methods.

Speakers
avatar for John Baty

John Baty

Technology Manager, Preservation Technologies, LP
As Technology Manager at Preservation Technologies, L.P., John Baty manages production of deacidification chemistry, supplying ten mass deacidification plants and spray deacidification systems worldwide. He also manages research and development, supply chain, and quality control... Read More →
LV

La Verne Lopes

QC and R&D technician, Preservation Technologies, LP

Co-Authors
KJ

Kent John

Dispersion Production, QC, and R&D Technician, Preservation Technologies, LP
N/A

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

22. (Collection Care) Nothing is Ever Simple: A Case Study in Flexible Project Management for Archives Conservation
Project parameters can change substantially from initial planning once work begins, particularly with large archival collections. In this case, several changes required a re-evaluation of the methods, processes and techniques used. The size of the collection tripled, staff discovered significant mold damage, and environmental conditions truncated treatment time. This poster will describe how I was able to adjust treatment processes and techniques to accommodate rapidly changing project needs. The legal records of the Leo Hershkowitz Collection (TAM 415) were initially thought to be the simplest of three collections to be treated as part of the Gardiner Project. This evaluation was based on staff experience with tri-folded legal documents and what eventually proved to be an extremely biased sample used in initial project planning. Once I began treatment, I discovered that the 150 boxes of the collection were larger than originally thought, tripling the size of the collection, that the paper was more brittle, and that many more inks were present than the sample indicated. Archives staff discovered extensive mold contamination when they began to inventory the collection, prompting me and other conservation staff to conduct an emergency survey of the material, revealing that 10% of the collection had extensive mold contamination. The initial workflow had to be entirely re-written. In order to manage the increased volume of work I triaged treatment steps, eventually using minimal surface cleaning and passive flattening. I ruled out humidification due to the variety of inks present, so flattening was performed only with the lab’s ambient seasonal humidity, meaning flattening was unexpectedly confined to the wetter spring and summer months as the lab’s HVAC system is unable to provide humidification in New York City’s dry winter months. As this was only one of three collections I was responsible for, there were not enough staff hours to cope with the mold, so I collaborated with an outside vendor who was able to perform mold remediation as well as some of the cleaning and flattening to NYU Libraries’ specifications. By maintaining a flexible approach to project management, and adjusting treatment plans throughout the process, the project is on track to meet goals despite serious initial setbacks.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Bero

Alexander Bero

Special Collections Conservator, New York University
Alex Bero is a Special Collections Conservator at New York University. He holds a Masters of Science in Information Studies with a Certification of Advanced Study in Book and Paper Conservation from the University of Texas at Austin. He has experience at the American Museum of Na... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

23. (Collection Care) Biblio-Archaeology: A Codicological Inventory, Condition Survey and Preservation Needs Assessment of Pre-Modern Codices and Incunabula in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection of the OSU Libraries
For the Undergraduate Summer Library Research Fellowship, I conducted condition surveys, a codicological inventory and preservation needs assessment of 48 pre-modern codices and 98 incunabula in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library (RBML) of the OSU Libraries. In my proposal I planned to assess all physical features, general condition and the preservation needs of each item under the supervision and guidance of OSU Libraries’ Book and Paper Conservator, Harry Campbell and the OSUL RBML Curator, Eric Johnson (my supervisors). I researched the fundamentals of building and operating a condition survey by reaching out to those who have had years of experience in conservation. I quickly became accustomed with the subject matter and created a reference document of descriptive elements that guided me through each evaluation which I adapted into my condition survey design. Upon the completion of the condition surveys I created a catalogue that would help organize 146 bound items from the RBML and guide faculty and students through the data. While it is designed to provide concise information, the individual condition surveys of each item can provide greater (or additional) detail. Condition work for special collections often go overlooked, but I was able to create a strong foundation for the recorded conditions of bound medieval manuscripts and incunabula in the RBML. I look forward to the hands-on conservation work that Harry Campbell has pre-approved for the manuscripts and incunabula that are in need of attention as part of my job as a student assistant technician in the Conservation Unit. I am hopeful that the condition and needs assessment survey I designed specifically for the RBML will become standard practice, and continue to be used to record physical aspects for future acquisitions, as well as provide an informative source for augmenting item records in the OSUL online catalog.

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Demmerle

Danielle Demmerle

Student Assistant, The Ohio State University Libraries Conservation Unit
I am a fourth year undergraduate at The Ohio State University Columbus campus. I am majoring in Medieval and Renaissance Studies with a minor in English and Studio Art. I am a student assistant at The Ohio State University Conservation Unit where I work with Harry Campbell, the h... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

24. (Book and Paper) Pineapple Paper - A New Material from Taiwan for Paper Conservation
This article will introduce “Pineapple paper”, which was developed and produced in Taiwan since 1970. Paper, one of the most important materials in paper conservation. In Eastern conservation field, there are several types of paper that are well-known by conservators, such as Minogami and Kozo Paper from Japanese, as well as Xuan Paper from China. Meanwhile, with the increasing variety of paper material and their characteristic, new conservation papers are then considered using to enrich the choices for conservators and helpfully to meet different conservation needs. Pineapple Paper was produced to conform to this requirement. Pineapple Paper is made in the process similar to traditional Xuan Paper. It presents Taiwanese environmental characters and integrates environment protection. This paper not only has the characteristic of visual pure color and elegant quality as traditional Xuan Paper but also paper strength advantage as Japanese paper. In addition, it hardly shows deterioration or discoloration after aging test procedures. In recent years, Pineapple Paper is starting to be accepted and used by Eastern painting and paper conservators in Taiwan for conservation and preservation. Furthermore, was also made especially for a famous Chinese Artist Chang Dai-Chien. In the article, we will also introduce the production process of Pineapple Paper, its paper characteristics and conservation case studies. We wishing that paper conservators who have not yet aware of this material to have one more choice in his paper material cabinet for future conservation work.

Speakers
avatar for Ting-Fu Fan

Ting-Fu Fan

Chief Conservator, San-Jian Art & Conservation (SJAC) 三間
Ting-fu Fan received his M.A. at the Graduate Institute of Conservation of Cultural Relics, Tainan National University of the Arts in 2004, majored in Asian Paintings Conservation. He worked at the National Palace Museum as a Chinese paintings conservator since 2006. Afterward, h... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

25. (Collection Care) The conservation of textile linings and seal cords- with a little help from textile and paintings conservation
This project confronts the often varying and complex problems encountered in book and paper conservation: the need to establish a minimal conservation treatment solution that remains sympathetic to the original document. In this case, two objects were treated adopting and adapting textile and painting conservation techniques, which here have been successfully applied for in situ treatments on two archival paper and parchment documents with textile components: • IR 130/41/22 - a nineteenth paper map lined with linen, torn with big losses in the fabric • E 24/18/1 – a sixteenth century parchment charter with a large wax pendant seal, with split silk braided cords. Both objects are part of the collections of the National Archives, the official archive for the UK government for England and Wales. Both identified as being ‘unfit for production’, due to their fragile physical state after a condition survey completed in 2010. With such fragile objects, it is expected that the treatment process from beginning to completion will be both testing and time consuming. As the traditional method of removing the original linen lining from the verso of paper maps would have severely affected IR 130/41/22 original structure, an in-situ treatment was devised from a method usually applied to cotton canvases in paintings conservation: the thread by thread tear mending, a variation of the Heiber technique. This in-situ treatment method successfully provided the means to retain all elements of the original map while at the same time stabilising the map allowing it to be accessed, once again, by the public. The damage associated with E 24/128/1, a sixteenth century parchment charter with a large wax pendant seal on degraded silk braided cords is a common problem within many collections. This provided the conservator with the challenge to retain the original structure of the silk cords while still attached to the seal and the parchment charter. The chosen treatment is an adaptation on the sewing cord repair of fifteenth century incunabula as published by Birgit Speta in 2003. In the case of the charter E 24/128/1 each of the original silk braided cords were partially broken and holding on only by individual silk threads. The treatment involved the addition and securing of new silk threads to the split original threads in order to stabilise the whole cord. For this, preliminary tests were undertaken in order to establish an appropriate choice of repair materials and repair procedures. The threads were secured in place supported by new cotton and silk threads, the chosen adhesive Lascaux 498H provided strength and at the same time sufficient flexibility to allow for the threads to be re-braided and stabilise what remained of the original cord. This method provided a way to retain all elements of the original silk cords while remaining attached to the parchment charter. The treatment solutions for the map and the charter proved to be highly successful in making the objects once again accessible to the general public, whilst maintaining their historical structure.

Speakers
SF

Solange FitzGerald

Conservation Manager, The National Archives
Solange FitzGerald has worked at the National Archives as a paper and book conservator since 2002. For the past 15 years she has led and worked extensively on the varied and often challenging book projects. The conservation work within the archive collection covers a wide range o... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

27. (Research and Technical Studies) The Permeation of Vapors through Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films
Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, aka Mylar® or Melinex®, are widely used materials within conservation. One of the most common uses of these films is for encapsulation. Our studies have shown that water can permeate through the PET whereas formic acid vapor permeates at a much slower rate and acetic acid vapor permeates even more slowly, if at all. The rate of permeation is dependent upon the molecular diameter of the vapor. The varying rates of penetration have a two-fold impact. One, they can act as a protecting layer against some hazardous volatile compounds within polluted environments. Two, they can trap hazardous volatile compounds within enclosures, creating a microenvironment which maybe hazardous to cultural heritage objects.The data suggests that deacidification should be performed prior to encapsulation.

Speakers
avatar for Patricia McGuiggan

Patricia McGuiggan

Research Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. McGuiggan obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. During her Ph.D., she was a research scholar in the Applied Mathematics Department at the Australian National University working with Richard Pashley. She spent 3 years as a postdoctoral fe... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Andrea Hall

Andrea Hall

Senior Research Specialist, Heritage Science for Conservation, Department of Conservation and Preservation, Sheridan Libraries and Museums, Johns Hopkins University
Andrea Hall is Senior Research Specialist at Heritage Science for Conservation in the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University where she is working on physical property testing of heritage materials, environmental monitoring, studying conservation t... Read More →
avatar for Molly K. McGath

Molly K. McGath

Andrew W. Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow, Heritage Science for Conservation, Department of Conservation and Preservation, Sheridan Libraries and Museums, Johns Hopkins University
Dr. Molly K. McGath is an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Heritage Science for Conservation within the Department of Conservation and Preservation at Johns Hopkins University with research focused on environmental monitoring, evaluation of past conservation treatments and... Read More →
avatar for Bill Minter

Bill Minter

Senior Book Conservator, Pennsylvania State University Library
William “Bill” Minter is currently senior book conservator for The Pennsylvania State University Libraries. Previously, he worked with the post-doctoral fellows in the Heritage Science for Conservation group at Johns Hopkins University. And during this time, he has maintained... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

28. (Architecture) Art or Awful: The Preservation and Conservation of Graffiti
Graffiti is a drawing or inscription made on a wall or other surface, usually without permission, so as to be seen by the public. It’s done for many different reasons like self-expression, boredom, or disrespect. When does graffiti go from an act of vandalism to be immediately removed, to an artful expression which should be saved and shared? Graffiti has a long and proud history dating back to Ancient Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire. The oldest graffiti at Pompeii is a simple Gaius was here, or more precisely, “Gaius Pumidis Dilphilus was here” dated October 3, 78 B.C. It is a classic that stands the test of time, as anyone familiar with Kilroy knows. Graffiti comes in many different forms: from carving in stone, spray paint on a brick wall, marker on a marble statue, pencil on walls, etching on glass, to stickers on everything. Although graffiti has become an accepted art form, there is still a wide chasm between work exhibited in a museum and work done without the permission of the property owner. The National Park Service has two documents related to the removal of graffiti: Keeping it Clean and “Preservation Brief 38: Removing Graffiti from Masonry” both dating to 1995. But information and guidelines on the preservation of graffiti is scarce. Papers have been presented on the conservation of murals and graffiti-style street art, but what about graffiti that was created just as an act of defacement? What makes some graffiti worth saving while other requires swift removal? It is easy to be fascinated by graffiti left by a Rear Admiral of the British Navy on the Temple of Dendur in 1817, and less so by the spray-painted tag found on your garage. Is there really a difference between Keith Haring’s mural “Once Upon a Time” in the men’s bathroom of The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center and the penises that (for reasons unknown) boys love to draw on any vertical surface? Although many factors go into the decision to remove or preserve, some of the most important are age, context, and the artist. Graffiti exists in our public spaces, our communities, and our streets. It can be thoughtful, crude, political, humorous, simple, artistic, territorial, offensive, creative, or a combination of these. Can conservators work together to create guidelines and standards for the preservation and conservation of graffiti? Or is it like many issues of conservation where the answer is “It depends?” Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc. has worked on several graffiti-related projects including the preservation of pencil graffiti on wallpaper in a museum, protection and conservation treatments to a spray-painted graffiti mural in a previously industrial neighborhood, and the removal of offensive graffiti from the side of a church. This presentation will discuss how each of these projects required us to stop and think about the consequences of removal versus preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie M. Hoagland

Stephanie M. Hoagland

Principal, Jablonski Buildig Conservation, Inc.
Stephanie M. Hoagland is a Partner and Architectural Conservator with Jablonski Building Conservation Inc. where she has been employed since 2003. She has a Master of Science in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Prese... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

29. (Objects) On A Roll: A New Artifact Support Approach during the Treatment of Cannons
Supporting and rotating heavy and cumbersome objects throughout the treatment process can present a real challenge. This problem is especially true when it comes to the conservation of cannons. The awkward size, shape, and weight of cannons makes it difficult to conduct surface cleaning and coating because work can only progress so far before the objects have to be turned over. This task is often carried out by having the objects elevated on wooden blocks which enables them to be carefully rolled over by hand to expose a new side to work. This process can be time consuming, requires the participation of several staff members, and can lead to surface abrasion of the objects and/or recently applied coatings. Therefore, when the conservation staff at The Mariners’ Museum and Park in Newport News, Virginia was asked to treat several cannon within the museum’s collection, it provided an opportunity to develop a new support approach. This led to the fabrication of a wheeled mount that held the cannons in an elevated horizontal position while at the same time through the use of a bearing system allowed the objects to be freely rotated. The use of the new support device during the conservation of the cannons resulted in a much easier and safer treatment for both staff and objects. This poster will provide an overall description of the construction and operation of the new support structure as well as highlight how the system could be modified for use with other kinds of large objects.

Speakers
avatar for William Hoffman

William Hoffman

Director of Conservation and Chief Conservator, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Will Hoffman received his Master's degree in art conservation from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 2009 specializing in the conservation of objects. He received Bachelors' degrees in Anthropology (concentrating in North American and Historic Archaeology) and Fine Arts... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

3. (Objects) THEOPHILUS ON THE HARDENING OF STEEL FILES
Casehardening is a technique developed to harden the exterior of low carbon content steels for objects such as hand tools or gun parts. Historic descriptions for the process of casehardening are rare. In his 12th century treatise On Divers Arts, Theophilius Presbyter presents one of the earliest, most complete explanations on the process of hardening small files. Traditionally it is thought that carbon is mainly responsible for the hardening of the metal surface, however, a question has arisen on the role of nitrogen in the process. In this experiment, Theophilus’s casehardening method was recreated and the samples produced were analyzed to determine if the method was one of carburization or nitrocarburization. Casehardened samples were analyzed by optical microscopy using a Zeiss Axio Imager. Microstructures of possible nitrides were found in each fired sample though it is not possible to definitively confirm them. While the presence of nitrogen cannot be absolutely confirmed in these casehardened samples, the goatskin used in the recipe was found to be one possible source of nitrogen. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy were utilized to verify and measure the presence of nitrogen.

Speakers
avatar for Katrina Zacharias

Katrina Zacharias

Third-year Graduate Fellow in Art Conservation, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State
Katrina Zacharias is a current Graduate Fellow in the Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State College. She is specializing in Objects conservation with an interest in Arms and Armor- firearms in particular. Katrina holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Missour... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Aaron Shugar

Aaron Shugar

Professor of Conservation Science, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State
Aaron N. Shugar joined the department in January 2006 as our new conservation scientist, focusing on inorganic chemistry. Aaron comes to us from the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute, where he was a visiting scientist. He also served as Co-Director of the Archaeometallurg... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Thornton

Jonathan Thornton

Professor of Objects Conservation, Buffalo State College
Jonathan Thornton has taught objects conservation at the Art Conservation Department since 1980. Following an earlier career as an artist/silversmith, he studied conservation in this department when it was still located in Cooperstown, NY, and received his M. A. and Certificate o... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

30. (Electronic Media) Using Open Source Software as New Media artworks restoration method and evaluate its pros and cons: A case study of New Media Art collection of National Museums in Taiwan.
In recent years, New Media Art has become one of the mainstreams Art trend in Taiwan. As museum starts to collect those artworks, how to preserve and conserve the New Media Artworks also becomes a challenge for those Contemporary Collecting Institutes. Comparing to the New Media Art preservation and conservation pioneers, such as U.S and some European countries, it seems Taiwan has started a little bit late. Due to the lack of experience, when National Museums in Taiwan face the challenge, there are rarely no in-field references to consult. This is a case study about the restoration of a New Media artwork, “Goang-ming Yuan, The Reason For Insomnia,1998 “, which its original software malfunction that trigger the interaction between the artwork and the audience is no longer capable to debug the software error. During the research, there are already some Contemporary and New Media Art conservation team from U.S and European countries chose Open Source Software as a tool to conserve these kinds of artworks. In this conservation project, museum members also decided to migrate the original Software to Open Source Software. After the migration, the works has return to its original function and able to exhibit again. This research focus on the New Media Art collection of National Museums in Taiwan, try to use Open Source Software as a technical method to conserve New Media Artworks, and evaluates its superiority and risk that may cause from the method.

Speakers
avatar for Tzu-chuan Lin

Tzu-chuan Lin

Project Coordinator, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts
Tzu-Chuan Lin works as a Project Coordinator at the Collection Management Department of National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts (NTMoFA) since 2014. He implemented the Taiwan Tech X Art Innovation Program which combines important collections of the museum with digital technology. He... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

31. (Research and Technical Studies) Degradation makers of cellulose acetate during aging
Being the first cellulose derivative that has been put into commercial production, CA (cellulose acetate) is a material that was used extensively in the 20th century by the film industry as well as by artists to create fine and decorative art. Compared with traditional material used in cultural heritage, cellulose acetate is a chemically unstable material resulting in shrinkage and deformation even at room temperature (such as “Little Large Glass” by Marcel Duchamp, Yale University Art Gallery). The material may has suffered from severely degradation when visible changes are found. It’s important to have proper evaluation of its preserve condition. Currently, scientists are concentrating on case studies instead of systemic research. In light of such situation, based on the review of plenty literature, several chemistry analysis methods are applied in this research, in order to find the degradation makers during degradation of cellulose acetate in different scales. Modern scientific methods such as SEM, FTIR, GPC and XRD are hired to explain degradation makers of cellulose acetate, providing support in the aspect of evaluation of degradation of cellulose acetate. The results showed deformation, curling and newly formed pores with the diameter in micrometer scale appears with the processing of degradation. The change of crystallinity differs from samples with different plasticizer content and artificial ageing in different conditions. The molecular weight experienced a significant decreasing during aging, while the molecular weight distribution didn’t see the same trend. Data from FTIR proves the characterization vibration bond changes. It should be highlighted the peak attributes to unbound water appears during ageing. Data from TGA-FTIR proves that the amount of thermal violate material decreases while degradation happens. The trend comes more significant with higher plasticizer content. Thermoporometery based on DSC analysis is an efficient method to characterize the pore structure in porous materials. Results from DSC and SEM shows that pore size of 7nm was found in all cellulose acetate samples, the diameter increase with the degradation. Cellulose acetate with 20% plasticizer content owns bigger pores compared with cellulose acetate ( 7.892 nm-9.347 nm). Interestingly, new pore with radius of 2.255nm appears in cellulose acetate with 20% plasticizer content. For the first time, a systemic research has been applied to investigate degradation makers, the results offer scientific support for cellulose acetate study as well as related micro-climate design.

Speakers
LL

Liu Liu

Postdoc Associate, Northwestern Polytechnical University
Being trained as a conservation scientist, Liu received her PhD of Conservation Science in 2017 from University of Science and Technology of China. She hold a bachelor degree of Material Chemistry and was a visiting assistant in research in Yale-Institute for the Preservation of... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lukasz Bratasz

Lukasz Bratasz

Head of Sustainable Heritage, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Łukasz Bratasz received his PhD in 2002 from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. In the same year, he joined the staff of the Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, where he remains a research fellow. He was a hea... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

32. (Contemporary Art) Conservation of The Spirit of Sunday in Shaw by Billy Colbert; Challenges of Treatment Design and Execution for Oversized, Contemporary, Multimedia Artwork
This poster will present the treatment of an oversized, contemporary, multimedia artwork in the collection of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The Spirit of Sunday in Shaw by Billy Colbert is a varnished and screen printed artwork on two found photographs printed on RC paper and attached to separate aluminum panels using a pressure-sensitive adhesive. The aluminum panels are attached with screws to a wood and aluminum framework for display and installation. Commissioned for the space, the artwork has hung in the Washington Convention Center since 2003. Shortly after installation, the artwork developed large, snaking, draw-like distortions across the surface that cyclically worsened and improved every summer and winter until they were permanently held in place just four years after installation. In addition to these distortions, one of the aluminum panel supports was warped, bulging outward at the central join of the two panels. These problems compromised the stability and visual integrity of the artwork, thus necessitating conservation treatment. Consultation with the artist in addition to a collaboration between, paintings, photography, and paper conservators allowed for a multidisciplinary approach to be developed. An extensive testing phase was implemented, not only to examine the solubility parameters of the materials, but to design methods that would be effective in treating the artwork. This phase included the creation of mock-ups to determine how the artwork could be re-assembled if removed from the aluminum panels. In addition to defining an appropriate treatment, it was necessary to discuss the cause of the distortions in the support and what steps would be required to prevent them from recurring. With all the data gathered, confident that conservation intervention would stabilize the support and significantly improve the visual appearance of the artwork, a treatment was designed and executed to remove the varnished and screen printed RC paper from the aluminum support, eliminate the distortions, modify the aluminum panel and framework support, and finally re-attach the artwork back onto the aluminum panels and framework. While art in public spaces is often subject to less than ideal conditions for preservation, the Washington Convention Center was willing to collaborate with conservators to improve the installation location and maintain a more consistent display environment for the artwork.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Loudermilk

Kristen Loudermilk

Conservator of Paintings, ARTEX Conservation Laboratory
Kristen earned her BS in Biochemistry, BA in Chemistry, and BA in Art History from Virginia Tech in 2003 and her Master’s in Art Conservation with a specialty in Paintings from Queen’s University in 2005. She has practiced paintings conservation at the ARTEX Conservation Labo... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

33. (Archaeological Conservation) The Wild West Comes to Southern Maryland: The conservation of three solder dot cans from Deadwood, South Dakota
Located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in Southern Maryland, the Maryland Archaeological Conservation (MAC) Laboratory is a tailor-made, state-of-the-art facility where conservation, archaeological research, and curation of Maryland’s archaeological collections occur. The MAC Laboratory not only conserves the State’s archaeological collections but also provides conservation services and guidance to Cultural Resource Management firms, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and museums throughout the United States. Over the past few years, the MAC Laboratory has steadily built a rapport with the City of Deadwood, in South Dakota, while conserving a variety of historic artifacts from their archaeological collections. In September of 2016, the City of Deadwood sent three metal solder dot cans with paper labels to the MAC Laboratory for conservation treatment. Each cylindrical can has a lead soldered seam along the side, a lead solder-filled hole in the lid, and are likely made of tin-plated iron. The cans are part of a collection of artifacts that were unearthed during the relocation of a historic structure, known as the Fountain House, within the city in March of 2015. The cans arrived at the lab with a corroded metal surface and stains and soil partially obscuring the fragile and fragmentary paper food labels that were still in situ. The artifacts presented a unique conservation challenge, as the paper labels had to be detached entirely from the metal can in order to treat the materials separately. Each material required a different approach to cleaning and stabilization. This poster will highlight the collaborative nature of the project and the techniques employed to conserve these uncommon archaeological objects.

Speakers
avatar for Frances Lukezic

Frances Lukezic

Conservator, Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory
Frances Lukezic is an objects conservator at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory and is currently a Co-Chair of AIC’s Archaeological Discussion Group. She has an MSc in Conservation from Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. Previously, she has worked at the... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

34. (Research and Technical Studies) Integrated Approaches to the Conservation of Multi-Component Systems - A Case Study with Dog Tags
This study examined the components of a set of dog tags from the movie Deer Hunter in the De Niro collection at the Harry Ransom Center. More specifically, this entailed the development of a set of analytical techniques to identify the composition of all item components along with the subsequent development of a long-term housing and exhibition solutions. Robert De Niro represents one of the most prominent actors in modern film, and many of his works a snapshot of the American identity throughout the latter half of the 20th century. The De Niro Collection at the Ransom Center subsequently represents an all-encompassing archive, housing materials with a wide variety of compositions, all of which have shown differing degrees of degradation, particularly those composed of plastics. The dog tags in particular represent one of these items, comprising two metal dog tags attached by a chain enclosed in a plastic covering. This enclosure was a typical characteristic of tags assigned during the Vietnam War, the setting of the Deer Hunter movie, to silence the metal during combat and protect it from the humid environment. Ironically, this plastic covering has contributed most to the degradation of the item, with leaching contributing to the corrosion of the metal underneath. The challenges of the project ultimately came down to finding the proper pieces of equipment to effectively identify the composition of the dog tags along with their covering, as well as the source of the exudate. We chose methods with an eye towards applications to similar projects and mixed compositions. The project utilized a combination of Infrared Spectroscopy along with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry to identify the main composition of the plastic covering along with the liquid present at the interface between the tags and their enclosing. This was combined with X-ray Fluorescence to identify the metals in the tags themselves along with any oxides forming at their surface. This has not only allowed the discovery of the source of the degradation, leaching of phthalate plasticizers, but also begin to identify methods of cleaning the metal underneath as well as saving the plastic so important to the context of the piece.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Ma

Emily Ma

Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Co-Authors
avatar for Ellen Cunningham Kruppa

Ellen Cunningham Kruppa

Director of Conservation, Harry Ransom Center
Ellen Cunningham-Kruppa is Associate Director for Preservation and Conservation at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at UT Austin. She has been a practitioner, educator, and consultant in the field of cultural record preservation for over 30 years. In 2016 Ellen was awa... Read More →
avatar for Olivia Primanis

Olivia Primanis

Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center
Olivia Primanis is the Senior Book Conservator at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, where she performs conservation treatments and manages the book lab and special projects. She is interested in general conservation and preservation subjects relating to library and mu... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

35. (Research and Technical Studies) Optimizing Paint Cross-Section Preparation for Modern and Contemporary Art: A Case Study
Big Egg (1968) by Ed Clark is a large oval-shaped abstract painting on canvas, created while the artist was working in France. The painting is from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) collection and underwent technical study and conservation at the Museum Conservation Institute (MCI). Clark is known for his technique of painting with the canvas on the floor, pouring and splashing many thin layers of paint and pushing them around with a large broom. Much of the paint surface has a matte and chalky appearance. Big Egg was originally thought to be acrylic, but preliminary analysis showed the underlying paint layers to be water sensitive and the pigments to be bound in polyvinylacrylate (PVAc) with a possible ethylene co-polymer. Currently, the painting is on view at the Visual Art Gallery at NMAAHC. This study is a continuation of research conducted in 2015-2016 on un-embedded paint samples from Big Egg with ATR-FTIR and Hirox microscopy. In this study, a paint cross-section embedding and polishing technique was developed to further the binder and pigment analysis of each paint layer with FTIR chemical mapping and SEM-EDX. This research is part of broader investigations by the authors with the goal to optimize paint sample preparation for modern and contemporary art. The paint cross-section methodology is as follows: 1) embed the paint sample in Bio-Plastic® 2) mount the embedded sample on double-sided silicon tape onto a glass slide 3) place the paint layers parallel to the glass slide 4) ensure strata of paint is fully on view when the sample is released from the mold 5) use metal tube as mold, ¾” in diameter cut to ¾” height 6) coat the interior of the mold with silicon grease 7) a negligible amount of resin exists between the paint sample and silicone tape resulting in minimal polishing 8) dry polish with MicroMesh 8) use Hirox reflective bright field to confirm paint sample surface topography. The analysis of the paint cross-sections starts from the least invasive technique, ending with the more invasive method—from Hirox microscope examination to FTIR mapping (measured in reflectance mode) to SEM-EDX. Using the methodology listed above, a paint cross- from Big Egg was analyzed and 13 layers of paint were observed. The thickness, inorganic elements, and binder of each stratum was examined by FTIR mapping and SEM-EDX. Water-sensitive PVAc paint in Big Egg was confirmed by ATR-FTIR on non-embedded paint and FTIR mapping of the embedded paint cross-section. This result supports the treatment selection of water-based consolidant, water-based inpainting material, and the choice of Beva film as a lining adhesive. Fully polished paint cross-sections ready for analysis can be prepared within a day. The application has been extended to include egg tempera paint, photographs, and polychrome. This cross-section preparation expands the instrumental analysis capability from one paint sample, maximizing the information gathered. Future work includes more comparative experiments with ion milling systems to improve the paint surface quality and further organic material analysis with FTIR-mapping.

Speakers
avatar for Jia-sun Tsang

Jia-sun Tsang

Senior Paintings Conservator, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University and completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). He is a physical scientist at the Smithsonian Institution (SI) Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledge of ma... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Stephanie Barnes

Stephanie Barnes

Conservator of Paintings, Barnes
Stephanie Barnes is a graduate of the Queen's University Master in Art Conservation program where she specialized in the conservation of paintings. She also holds a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Mount Allison University and an M.Sc. in Chemistry from Laval University. Stephanie recentl... Read More →
EF

Elle Friedberg

Pre-Program Intern/Volunteer, National Gallery of Art
Elle Friedberg is a printmaker inspired by nature and organic forms. She received her B.A. as a double major in studio art and chemistry from Wellesley College. Elle is currently the Paintings Conservation Intern at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute and lives in Washi... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Lam

Thomas Lam

Physical Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University. After his Ph.D, Thomas completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Thomas is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledg... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

36. (Collection Care) Fire Hazard of Traditional Potteries with Polyester Overlay Plywood
Fire poses one of the greatest threats to irreplaceable cultural heritage. While ensuring human safety is of uttermost importance, fire and rescue departments and cultural heritage institutions have also endeavored to understand the impact that museum fire has on the exhibits. So far, a list of possible risk factors has been drawn, but no empirical analysis has ever been carried out on any of the factors. As different materials react to the changes of temperature and humidity differently, this paper selects pottery, a commonly seen material, for our examination. We will first identify the possible risk factors for the exhibits when museums catch fire. We then choose high-temperature and smoke as the research subject and conduct experiments on four types of Taiwanese traditional potteries (two types traditional Chinese handmade teapots, Zisha clay and Taiwan red-clay teapot) for tolerance testing. The possible complication that wooden exhibition cases may cause for the above-mentioned potteries is also considered. Based on the experiment results, this paper will make rescue priority suggestion for pottery type exhibits in museums. It is hoped that the research will make contributions for museums to make fire safety and evacuation plan, and preventive conservation in the future.

Speakers
MT

Mei Tu

Research & Collection Department Assistant, Tainan Art Museum (TAM)

Co-Authors
JH

Jay Hsieh

Professor, Department Of Materials Science And Engineering, National Taiwan University
PH

Patricia Huang

Assiant Proffesor, Department of Art & Design Design, National Taipei Education University

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

37. (Paintings) Archiving for the Museums Using the Ultra-High Resolution Scanning System
On May 18, 2015, the Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation (Tokyo, JAPAN) closed its doors in preparation for the construction of a new building, presenting us with a unique window of opportunity for performing ultra-high resolution scans of the museum’s most valuable paintings. The Ishibashi Foundation Collection includes more than 2,600 works of art. The core of the collection consists of 19th century Impressionist paintings from France, 20th century Western art, Japanese Western-style paintings, and so on. While the museum was closed to the public, an ultra-high resolution digital archiving project was undertaken for conservation of artworks and digital exhibitions. The museum chose to use scanners manufactured by Sabia Inc., developed at the Advanced Imaging Technology Laboratory of Kyoto University for its large-scale digitization project.  The Ultra-High resolution imaging is on the rise in the field of digital archiving of cultural heritage. Conventional commercially available systems are both time consuming and costly for museums and galleries. However, by using a high resolution scanner which is particularly designed to address the limitations of conventional techniques, we could reduce both time and cost significantly. We have brought the scanners to universities, museums, and temples around the world and has digitized thousands of works. The main feature of the scanner is its excellent portability, so it can be carried around to the site and the scanning time is very shorter compared to other available technologies. The scanner features a dual line camera head which can take simultaneous visible and near infrared images. This unique feature offers greatly reduced the acquisition time unlike conventional imaging techniques where these two types of images must be acquired separately. The light sources used were a visible LED and near infrared LED (~850nm spectral peak). The cameras were two line CCD cameras. One camera was filtered using a UV/IR cut filter while the other camera was filtered with an IR filter. At the Bridgestone museum scanning project, the scanning resolution was 1000dpi (~39 pixel/mm). There were over 100 oil paintings digitized belonging to the collection of Bridgestone Museum of Art at the Art Research Center in Tokyo and it only took around 10 days to acquire multiple types of ultrahigh resolution images which include symmetrically-lit visible images, specularly-lit visible light images and near. In this Bridgestone Museum project, these paintings represent the best of the best in their collection. The paintings vary in sizes the largest of which is around 2 x 2 m. In this paper, we present the result of our scanning and share some insights on how to do a large-scale ultrahigh resolution digitization projects within a practical budget and time limit. Our more than 10 years of experience in digitizing large objects would be of interest to the museum community who are planning to do a similar project. We would also share how we can use these ultrahigh resolution images for studying the material and techniques used in the artworks for conservation and preservation efforts.

Speakers
JA

Jay Arre Toque

CTO, Sabia Inc
Dr. Jay Arre Toque is currently the Chief Technical Officer of Sabia Inc. He has doctoral degree from the Graduate School of Engineering at Kyoto University, specializing in developing high-resolution analytical imaging technology. He was a JSPS postdoctoral fellow for two years... Read More →

Co-Authors
AI

Ari Ide-Ektessabi

Professor, Kyoto University
To follow
YS

Yushihide Shimbata

Curator, Bridgestone Museum of Art
To follow

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

38. (Book and Paper) You’re Printing What? Where? The material stability and safety of 3D printing thermoplastic polymers for fused filament fabrication.
The rapid growth and adoption of 3D printing technologies has or will soon bring a new generation of printed polymer objects into our collections. With almost half a million printers shipped in 2016 alone, 3D printed objects are likely to stay with us for as long as the polymers last. While 3D printing encompasses a variety of distinct processes, fused filament fabrication (FFF) is the most popular and accessible 3D printing technology, utilizing a heated nozzle head to deposit layers of polymer into a computer generated design. FFF is widely used in museums, arts, and educational settings as a low-cost teaching tool. At the University of Florida (UF), we have printed exhibit mounts, archaeological replicas for classroom use, and prosthetics for a children’s charity. Despite the widespread adoption of FFF technology, little testing has been done to either understand the stability of the thermoplastic polymers used in these printers or potential health ramifications of bringing industrial production methods to a desktop printer. To better understand the long-term stability of the variety of polymers compatible with the 3D printers at UF, the UF Libraries are undertaking Oddy testing and Photographic Activity Testing on the commercially available polymers to understand their long-term stability for possible use in collection storage and display. In parallel with the material testing, we will be measuring the emission of ultrafine particles (UFPs) during the printing process. UFPs and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) impact indoor air quality and may be a potential health risk to users. The results of this testing will help conservators make key materials decisions for the health and safety of our collections and our creators. Materials testing will provide insights to potential hazards entering collections as well as potential tools for use in creating custom housings and exhibit mounts. Understanding the emission of UFPs during printing can help guide room and ventilation design to minimize potential health risks to conservators, artists, and other makers.

Speakers
avatar for Fletcher Durant

Fletcher Durant

Preservation Librarian, University of Florida Libraries
Fletcher Durant is the Preservation Librarian at the University of Florida Libraries. He focuses on the preventive conservation, the sustainability, and risk management. He has been the Preservation Archivist for NYU Libraries and an Assistant Conservator at NYPL. His MSIS is fro... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Neelam Bharti

Neelam Bharti

Chemistry Librarian, Marston Science Library at the University of Florida
Neelam Bharti is the Chemistry Librarian at Marston Science Library at the University of Florida. She has her PhD in Chemistry from Jamia Millia Tslamia.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

39. (Archaeological Conservation) Stone-panelled red lacquer wooden table excavated from King Lu’s tomb of Ming Dynasty and its lacquer technique study
The earliest-known Chinese lacquerware is a wooden bowl dating back to 7000 years ago, the era of Neolithic, which lacquer was regarded as waterproof function with decorating fine objects artistically. With the development of sophisticated lacquer process for thousands of years, the manufacture of lacquerware during Ming Dynasty have reached the summit in art and techniques, favoured by the privileged class as which is symbolic of social status, power and wealth. The tenth son of the first emperor (ZHU Yuanzhang) of Ming dynasty, ZHU Tan (1370-1389AD) , King Lu, whose tomb was found in Mt. Jiulong at Zoucheng, Shandong Province. More than 1100 funerary objects, including guard of honour figurines, lacquerwares, costumes, and furniture have been excavated and have provided precious material for further study of the ritual system together with clothing and furniture styles, of early Ming Dynasty. It has also revealed that the lacquerwares of Ming Dynasty have transformed functional usage of earlier period into ornamental purpose like for household exhibition. In order to better understand the lacquer craft of the stone-panelled red lacquer wooden table (see Fig. 1) in the past and restore and preserve this valuable artefact particularly the lacquered-wooden part with appropriate treatment, scientific exploration has been conducted before and during the conservation process. SEM-EDAX, XRD and FT-IR are main methodologies were applied to investigate fallen fragments of the red lacquer wooden table. The cross sectional analysis of the lacquer sample elucidated that, apart from the substrate, is composed of three layers, e.g. ground layer, finish layer, and surface layer (red lacquer film layer). Characterisation of lacquer film has shown that raw Chinese lacquer and cinnabar (HgS) added as the pigment, were mixed for the manufacture technique. Structure of polysaccharides has also been detected via IR and further analysis has suggested the support layer is made of fibres which might be derived from hemp. The fibre netting is believed to strengthen the whole furniture purpose, as well as increase the porosity of the item for gripping more layers of lacquer. Infrared spectrum has also indicated that tung-oil, a popular additives for manufacture lacquerwares during that time, was missing, not added during the lacquer-making process. Elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction suggested that quartz (SiO2) were added, and the well-rounded quartz particles showed they might have been artificially ground and then added into the lacquer as a filling to increase the hardness. Historical documents may not be able to fully explain the initiative in technical evolvement of the lacquerwares and how aesthetic taste of that time influenced and reformed the lacquerware’s manufacture process and artistry; nevertheless cultural objects would provide nuggets of information to unlock the past, how lacquerwares had been juxtaposed with contemporary architecture, furniture and furnishings to reach a visual harmony and ideal. Less practical and prone to decorative, may reflect social and economic development and state of that era.

Speakers
JW

Jianlan Wang

Lecturer, Shanghai Institute of Visual Arts
Jianlan Wang is currently teaching and doing research in Shanghai, China, after completing her PhD study in chemistry and conservation at Queen's University Belfast, UK. Her research interest is in archaeology /conservation and scientific analysis of objects and textiles.

Co-Authors
YW

Yunpeng Wang

deputy director of department of modern analysis, Shandong cultural relics protection and restoration center
Yunpeng Wang graduated in 2007 from School of physics in Shandong University, with a bachelor degree. In 2017 he has got master degree in School of materials science and engineering in Shandong University. Now he is deputy director of department of modern analysis of Shandong cul... Read More →
JX

Junping Xu

Director of department of object conservation
Junping Xu has graduated from Northwestern University with Bachelor degree of Science in conservation technology in 2003. From July 2003 to December 2015, he engaged in the protection of cultural relics in the Museum of Shandong. From January 2016 to now, he has been engaged in t... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

4. (Wooden Artifacts) Investigating the Renaissance Marriage Chest: A Study of the Methods and Materials Used in the Construction of Two Florentine Cassoni from the Workshop of Paolo Uccello
The Yale University Art Gallery has in its collection two rare examples of fifteenth-century cassoni from the workshop of Paolo Uccello (Florence, 1397-1475): a cassone front panel, depicting The Triumphal Entry of Titus and Vespasian into Rome (ca. 1430), and a complete cassone with painted panels depicting The Battle of the Amazons Before the Walls of Troy; and female allegories of Faith and Justice; with its original lid, which features a reclining female nude on the interior (ca. 1460). Initial investigations of the cassone and the cassone front panel indicated the need for in-depth technical research that would inform and support their restoration treatments. In 2016, technical examinations of both works were performed in preparation for the forthcoming conservation treatment of the painted panels. Through visual examination, infrared and ultraviolet photography, reflectance transformation imaging (RTI), micro x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, x-radiography and stereo radiography techniques, the materials and methods used to construct the cassone and the preparatory and paint layers techniques could be identified. These investigative techniques, which most importantly confirmed the presence of original 15th-century nails in all corners, show that the cassone has maintained its structural entity and essential dimensions despite several 19th-century additions. In addition to structural changes, these techniques have also informed several alterations made to the painted surfaces and have shed light on the overall conservation history of the cassone. Technical research of the cassone has helped to better understand cassone panel fragment, in terms of its preparatory and paint layers, conservation history, and dismemberment. Comparisons of these two works, each created at early and late periods in Uccello’s career, not only speak to the changes and consistencies in Paolo Uccello’s workshop(s), but also help to elucidate our understanding of other 15th-century cassone panels. The preliminary results of our technical investigation will be discussed in this poster with a focus on the artist materials and techniques encountered in these two fifteenth-century cassoni.

Speakers
avatar for Sydney Beall

Sydney Beall

Postgraduate Fellow in Paintings Conservation, Yale University Art Gallery
Sydney Beall is a Postgraduate Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the Yale University Art Gallery where she is focusing on the conservation treatments of two Italian 15th-century cassone painted by Paolo Uccello (1397–1475). She earned her M.S. from the Winterthur/University o... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Anikó Bezur

Anikó Bezur

Director of Scientific Research of the Technical Studies Laboratory, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Dr. Anikó Bezur is the Wallace S. Wilson director of the Technical Studies Laboratory at Yale’s Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage. She holds a PhD in materials science and engineering from the University of Arizona and completed graduate internships at the Ge... Read More →
avatar for Irma Passeri

Irma Passeri

Senior Conservator of Paintings, Yale University Art Gallery
Irma Passeri is Senior Paintings Conservator at the Yale University Art Gallery. She received her degree in the Conservation of Easel Paintings from the Conservation School of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, in Florence in 1998. Prior to working for the Yale Art Gallery, she work... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

40. (Book and Paper) Extraction and Analysis of DNA from Renaissance-Style Prepared Paper
Our overall goal is to test the hypothesis that biological material, including ancient DNA, can be extracted from 500-plus-year-old Renaissance artworks such as written folios and metalpoint drawings. We report here the preliminary results of a multidisciplinary technical and scientific research study where samples of modern “prepared” paper were analyzed. An IRB-approved human subjects protocol was initiated to allow us to collect saliva samples. The saliva samples were then used to fabricate prepared paper samples according to Cennini’s original description of methods (Broecke, L., “Cennino Cennini’s Il Libro dell’Arte: A New English Translation and Commentary with Italian Transcription”, London: Archetype Publications, Ltd., 2015). We then developed techniques to extract DNA from homogeneous samples of the prepared paper. Using real-time quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction, RT q-PCR), we measured the sensitivity of the extraction methods and determined whether the DNA that can be extracted is suitable for DNA sequencing. We determined that DNA from the cells in human saliva used to prepare paper could be extracted quantitatively from various paper types, and that the DNA can be amplified and detected using RT q-PCR. From a 1.2-mm “punch biopsy” we achieved the theoretical detection limit of 6 picograms of DNA, which corresponds to the amount of DNA in one human epithelial cell. On average, the DNA yield from a punch biopsy from the prepared paper is the equivalent of about 7 cells. We have begun to test aged specimens and will further study the inhibitory effects of metalpoint media, paints, resins, glues, waxes, etc. to human DNA testing. We will also employ single-cell Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) in order to obtain genomes from DNA extracted from the paper samples. In summary, we report preliminary results that provide a basis for developing a minimally-invasive method to analyze artworks, such as drawings on Renaissance-prepared paper. The methods we develop are applicable to studies of authentic artworks and paper documents from various periods. Conservation scientists using UV, XRF and X-ray technologies to study artworks should consider that under certain conditions, UV light and X-rays damage DNA, thereby forever removing the possibility of extracting artists’ DNA and other biological information from works on paper or other substrates.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas P. Sakmar

Thomas P. Sakmar

Richard M. & Isabel P. Furlaud Professor, Rockefeller University
Thomas P. Sakmar, M.D. is a physician-scientist and the Richard M. & Isabel P. Furlaud Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Signal Transduction at The Rockefeller University in New York. He is also a guest professor at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr... Read More →
avatar for Karina C. Åberg

Karina C. Åberg

Artist-in-Residence/Guest Investigator, Rockefeller University
Karina Åberg is currently artist-in-residence and guest investigator in The Leonardo DNA Project at The Rockefeller University in New York. She received a BFA in media arts and illustration and an MFA in computer graphics and media at School of Visual Arts in New York. She has e... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Thomas Huber

Thomas Huber

Research Assistant Professor, Rockefeller University
Thomas Huber, M.D., Ph.D. is a faculty member at the Rockefeller University in New York where he studies chemical and molecular biology of G protein-coupled receptors, an important cell surface protein that serves as a drug target for up to one-third of therapeutic medicines. He... Read More →
avatar for Manija A. Kazmi

Manija A. Kazmi

Research Specialist, Rockefeller University
Manija A. Kazmi, M.S. is a research specialist in the Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Signal Transduction at the Rockefeller University in New York. She received her M.S. in molecular biology from New York University and has extensive experience in molecular cloning and recombin... Read More →
avatar for Rhonda K. Roby

Rhonda K. Roby

Guest Investigator, Rockefeller University
Rhonda K. Roby, Ph.D., M.P.H. is a forensics geneticist with a special interest in DNA detection technology. She received an A.B. in Biology and French from Washington University in St. Louis, an M.P.H. from University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. in genetics from Univer... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

41. (Book and Paper) Rising from the ashes : The conservation and treatment of paper support objects with large loss and burn
Burn is not a common deterioration in the cultural relics of paper base. Burn may be from the process of material made or the bad collection environment, like the mounting or storage made by the bad materials. “Mazu” journal's first issue collects by National Museum of Taiwan Literature, has a large part loss and burn on the book cover and pages, there is over half of the book cover missing that the item is so weak and unstable. Since this object is one evident of special regime conversion in Taiwan, it’s very important in cultural change, the history of literature and book binding. Therefore, this paper will use present digital printing out technology to restore this important journal, and will make contribution for the condition and consider treatment of the burned object. “Mazu” is a Japanese journal published during the period which Japan colonial Taiwan. ”Mazu”, the name of journal, is the goddess of the sea from the Taiwan traditional belief, and the content of journals is the poems and novels all surrounded by this theme. The magazines are hand binding by the editor, Mitsuru Nishikawa, due to his personal hobby for beauty of the binding and limited book, and publishing for those who collect books. It’s also the first one literature magazine which is combined of literature with art and printing technology. The illustrations of book are the print works all about Taiwanese folk and religious themes, and the pages are Asia handmade paper, on the endpaper stick a sheet of “paper money”, which used to be in the ceremony of Taiwan's Traditional Belie. “Paper money” base is made of straw fiber, and d decorate with gold leaf and red prints, and is incensed with fire to sacrifice to gods in East Asian traditional belief which is meaning for communicate with god and pray for blessings. In this journal, paper money is meaning the decoration of book ticket. The deterioration of this book is serious that the burn, brittle and lose the full cover and pages. The paper supports are dark brown color, and the water stain, tide line on the paper outward diffused from the spine as the center. It’s easily broken and peeling off since burn and brittle when doing the treatment, and that makes it extremely difficult during all the conservation treatment with the choice of treatment materials also have many considerations. At the same time this paper also the basic scientific analysis for burn part of the paper, and compensation large missing by using Asia mounting lining technique with inkjet printing out technology to maintain the texture of the cultural relics and visual continuity.

Speakers
SC

Su-Yuan Cheng

paper conservator, National Museum of Taiwan Literature
Su-Yuan Cheng as a paper conservator at the National Museum of Taiwan Literature. She received a MA degree in paper conservation from Tainan National University of the Art in 2014. She obtained training in National Library of Australia and Germanisches National museum. Since 2015... Read More →
JJ

Jen Jung Ku

Senior Paper Conservator, National Museum of Taiwan Literature
Jen Jung Ku received a MA in paper conservation from the Tainan National University of the Arts Tainan National University of the Arts (2010). She undertook advanced internships and additional training at the George Eastman House and Library and Archives Canada .She is presently... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

42. (Architecture) Cooperation with different backgrounds for monument protection. How deep can we interfere with the monument?
A social initiative, connecting people of different professions, formed in order to save wooden monuments. The responsibilities are divided between the Departments of Wood Conservation and Architecture of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, and the Androlli Foundation. A team from Wood Conservation Department prepared the assessment of the technical condition of the monument. Another team from Architecture, attempted to save the original monuments' substance and proposed a new form of adaptation for the Wooden Villa. The enthusiasts of old wooden architecture from the Andriolli Foundation researched the history of the building and took care of the legal aspects. In other hand work on a historic wooden building forces on conservator to make detailed analysis and research of the conservation status of structural and decorative wooden elements. The conservation program must take into account the historical destiny of the building, but also the requirements of modern construction. It often involves the need to adapt it to new conditions. The paper presents also the problems that a conservator has to solve to preserve as much historical substance as possible in order to adapt to new needs and, above all, to take care of the safety of users of modern facilities. How deep he can ingere in historical susbtance to protect them? The aim of the presentation is to present our experiences of cooperation between different organizations focused on saving a wooden building and conservation dilemma which they met. The reflections are presented on the Gurewicz Pension located in the Otwock in Poland.

Speakers
avatar for Ewa Lisiecka

Ewa Lisiecka

Warsaw University of Life Sciences
AM

Agnieszka Mielnik

Warsaw University of Life Sciences
Wood passionist.


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

43. (Research and Technical Studies) Laying with Tiffany: Conservation of the Swan Memorial Glass Mosaic at Woodlawn Cemetery
The glass designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany and his studio were unparalleled in American art of the late 19th and early 20th century. Less known, but no less significant were the studio’s architectural mosaic and monument designs. Historians have begun to research commissions but much remains to be done on the original fabrication and conservation of this work. The Swan Monument was designed by Tiffany Studios and installed in Woodlawn Cemetery in 1914. The mosaic was commissioned from Tiffany by Helen M.W. Swan for her late husband Charles. The first phase of a conservation study on the monument documented current conditions, analyzed materials and fabrication, determined deterioration mechanisms, and identified potential conservation methods. The canopy style monument is ten feet tall and composed of Tiffany granite, a variegated pink granite quarried in Braintree, MA. A 2’8 ½” x 6’11” art-glass mosaic panel fills the central panel of the structure and is covered by a shallow portico. The scene is likely influenced by Pre-Raphaelite imagery and depicts an angel guiding a woman into a heavenly landscape. The composition is enhanced by the dramatic curvature of the angel’s wing and by the artisan’s usage of the firm’s infamous iridescent glass on both the angel and the idyllic countryside to emphasize their celestial quality. The memorial is unique among the large collection of Tiffany Studios’ works found in Woodlawn, in that its mosaic is open-air and readily visible to the public, and it is one of only a small number of extant memorials of its kind in the United States. The exposure of the mosaic contributes to its surface decay and the loss of many of the glass tesserae over the past century. Records from Woodlawn Cemetery indicate that the memorial began shedding glass and needed repair less than four years after installation. Over the years, some tesserae were recovered and replaced during repair campaigns while many others were lost. Consequently, the mosaic now has significant areas of loss and many areas of the remaining glass display corrosion and conchoidal spalling from prolonged contact with water and other damaging substances. XRD analysis determined that the original backing material was made of Keene’s cement, a gypsiferous, hard plaster, and was reinforced with metal bars. SEM and SEM-EDS were used to analyze the surface topography and chemical makeup of samples of degraded tesserae as well as to analyze the effect of a micro abrasive treatment to remove a thin layer of corroded glass from the tessera surface in an effort to expose the fully-saturated, colored glass underneath. Removal of this thin layer of color-leached silica on affected tesserae and re-coating with a protective layer of Acryloid B-72 returns the glass tesserae to their original appearance and protects their surfaces from future exposure. Conservation of the monument based on testing results is currently underway. The extant art glass is being stabilized, detached tesserae re-attached, and missing tesserae will be cut and replaced in-kind from donations of similar sheets of Tiffany glass when available.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Magill

Courtney Magill

Lab Manager, University of Pennsylvania
Courtney Magill is the lab manager for the Architectural Conservation Laboratory and a post-graduate fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She graduated from the University of Georgia with dual Bachelor of Arts degrees in art history and classical culture in 2011. Through her... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Frank Matero

Frank Matero

Professor of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania Architectural Conservation Laboratory
Frank G. Matero is Professor of Architecture and Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Director and founder of the Architectural Conservation Laboratory and a member of the Graduate Group in the Dep... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

44. (Book and Paper) Bold Will Hold: Investigating Artist Materials of Classic American Tattoo Flash
This research will explore the materials and methods behind the creation of North American paper-based tattoo artifacts from the 19th and 20th centuries. As the folk art canon arguably includes tattoo ephemera, the conservation of these works on paper deserve attention for best practice based on materials, techniques and historical use. These objects include flash (the drawn and printed designs for tattoos), stencils and sketchbooks which intersect as industrial art during the time of their creation, to highly collectible artworks in and outside the tattoo community at present. Vintage flash sheet designs range from rudimentary to ornate in their execution. Although similar images depict ageless themes of love, life and loss, one flash sheet showcasing representations of heartbreak is not the same as another sheet of broken hearts. Artist materials used to create these objects vary widely and invite exploration. The paper objects surrounding the tattoo industry of the past, such as hand-painted business advertisements and flash sheets, were created using an assortment of materials that encompass different substrates, surface coatings, adhesives, pigments and dyes. Most frequently these objects were heavily handled, tacked directly to walls and pork-chopped, the process by which specific designs were cut to be collaged with others on a single sheet. Due to their environment of constant use by artists in stationary shops or more itinerant set-ups, physical damage is common. Signs of structural and cosmetic degradation include water damage, nicotine stains, aged varnishes, paper loss and media disturbances. As a conservator who treats these objects, I have observed that tattoo historians and tattoo history collectors can have different conservation goals. To inform a treatment course for these artworks, if any, it is necessary to compile more studied information regarding the materials and their original context. This project aims to gather and organize findings to build case studies by working directly with original materials. Non-destructive analysis using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) will be exercised. Sourcing archival materials in addition to interviewing current practitioners of this art form will help support a continued dialogue that can help acquaint other conservation professionals to preserving these historical artworks.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Moeller-[PA]

Laura Moeller-[PA]

Conservator, Strange Stock Art Conservation
Laura Moeller is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works who currently operates Strange Stock Art Conservation, a private practice studio in Covington, Kentucky. For over a decade, Laura has been treating paper and photog... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

45. (Archaeological Conservation) The two layers technique for supporting and assembling severely damaged composed sandals of King Tutankhamun
This study discusses the conservation of a pair of composed sandals of king Tutankhamun which considered unique and one of the kind, made of three principle materials; leather, gold and papyrus. some conservation treatments were applied on the sandals at the discovery process in 1922 which caused rigidity, fragmentation and darkness in the leather, buckling in the golden belts that surround the base, golden ornaments felt of the sandals as a result the sandals were categorized as a material for study and not for exhibition. a full documentation study was applied by digital photography and Auto-Cad program for making deterioration map for the sandals. Some microbiological test swaps were taken to test the sandals beside some investigations and analysis were executed; FTIR for identifying previous conservation materials and XRF for recognizing the metal type used in manufacturing of the sandals. Then several steps of conservation were applied; mechanical cleaning and consolidation for each piece of fragment. In order to prevent any possible new damage for the fragments the reassembling of the fragments was tried first by Photoshop before the actual procedure as each pair of matched fragments were signed with special symbol, the pieces then were adhered by Klucel G and support of Japanese paper. The Japanese paper was died first with a natural black dye to make the support suitable in color with the sandals but still can be recognized. A second layer of acid free cardboard was used to support the sandals from the bottom without adding adhesive. The conservation treatments extended the lifetime of the sandals and stabilized their condition. For the correct dealing and handling of the previous sandals, a plexi glass holder was designed as a final step.

Speakers
SM

Safwat Mohammed

Head Assistant of Organic Material Lab, Grand Egyptian Museum
Safwat Mohamed graduated from Cairo University, Faculty of Archaeology and Conservation Department in 2001.  He got his master degree in Heritage Conservation and Site Management, a joint master between Helwan University in Egypt and BTU in Germany. He has been working  in the... Read More →

Co-Authors
HK

Hadeel Khalil Abd Mohsen

conservator at the special project lab, conservation center, the Grand Egyptian museum
Hadeel was born in Kuwait in 2nd of November 1985, she was graduated from Cairo university faculty of archaeology, conservation department year 2007 and obtained her master degree in Heritage conservation and site management, a joint master between Helwan university in Egypt and... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

46. (Paintings) Archiving for the Museums Using the Ultra-High Resolution Scanning System
On May 18, 2015, the Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation (Tokyo, JAPAN) closed its doors in preparation for the construction of a new building, presenting us with a unique window of opportunity for performing ultra-high resolution scans of the museum’s most valuable paintings. The Ishibashi Foundation Collection includes more than 2,600 works of art. The core of the collection consists of 19th century Impressionist paintings from France, 20th century Western art, Japanese Western-style paintings, and so on. While the museum was closed to the public, an ultra-high resolution digital archiving project was undertaken for conservation of artworks and digital exhibitions. The museum chose to use scanners manufactured by Sabia Inc., developed at the Advanced Imaging Technology Laboratory of Kyoto University for its large-scale digitization project.  The Ultra-High resolution imaging is on the rise in the field of digital archiving of cultural heritage. Conventional commercially available systems are both time consuming and costly for museums and galleries. However, by using a high resolution scanner which is particularly designed to address the limitations of conventional techniques, we could reduce both time and cost significantly. We have brought the scanners to universities, museums, and temples around the world and has digitized thousands of works. The main feature of the scanner is its excellent portability, so it can be carried around to the site and the scanning time is very shorter compared to other available technologies. The scanner features a dual line camera head which can take simultaneous visible and near infrared images. This unique feature offers greatly reduced the acquisition time unlike conventional imaging techniques where these two types of images must be acquired separately. The light sources used were a visible LED and near infrared LED (~850nm spectral peak). The cameras were two line CCD cameras. One camera was filtered using a UV/IR cut filter while the other camera was filtered with an IR filter. At the Bridgestone museum scanning project, the scanning resolution was 1000dpi (~39 pixel/mm). There were over 100 oil paintings digitized belonging to the collection of Bridgestone Museum of Art at the Art Research Center in Tokyo and it only took around 10 days to acquire multiple types of ultrahigh resolution images which include symmetrically-lit visible images, specularly-lit visible light images and near. In this Bridgestone Museum project, these paintings represent the best of the best in their collection. The paintings vary in sizes the largest of which is around 2 x 2 m. In this paper, we present the result of our scanning and share some insights on how to do a large-scale ultrahigh resolution digitization projects within a practical budget and time limit. Our more than 10 years of experience in digitizing large objects would be of interest to the museum community who are planning to do a similar project. We would also share how we can use these ultrahigh resolution images for studying the material and techniques used in the artworks for conservation and preservation efforts.

Speakers
JA

Jay Arre Toque

CTO, Sabia Inc
Dr. Jay Arre Toque is currently the Chief Technical Officer of Sabia Inc. He has doctoral degree from the Graduate School of Engineering at Kyoto University, specializing in developing high-resolution analytical imaging technology. He was a JSPS postdoctoral fellow for two years... Read More →

Co-Authors
AI

Ari Ide-Ektessabi

Professor, Kyoto University
To follow
YS

Yushihide Shimbata

Curator, Bridgestone Museum of Art
To follow

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

47. (Book and Paper) VisColl: Modeling the physical structure of early books
VisColl is a system for modeling and visualizing the physical structure of early books. The current version is designed specifically for the description of medieval manuscripts, although future plans include modifying it to also suit early printed books. Structural information for medieval codex manuscripts is normally provided in the form of collation formulas or diagrams. Both of these describe each quire in the book in terms of the position of that quire in the manuscript, how many leaves the quire contains, and if any leaves have been added or removed. Before I developed VisColl, when cataloging a manuscript I would use a pencil and paper to take notes concerning the construction of the book, then I would convert those notes to a collation formula, typing that into the field of whatever system I was working in. I would also frequently draw diagrams, but diagrams are not usually included in online catalogs. VisColl allows me to work in a different way, more efficiently but also more effectively. VisColl enables its users to model the collation of manuscripts and then to present that information in various ways, including diagrams and formulas traditionally used in conservation descriptions, but also in more novel ways - for instance, showing the distribution of added leaves that were sew in vs. tipped-in throughout a book, or distinguishing between various substrates (paper and parchment, or different sets of paper). VisColl is configurable so different users can assign different taxonomies - someone interested in types of ink can use their own taxonomy, while someone interested in types of paper can use a different one. And someone else can use both of them. The system is designed to be very flexible on both input and output. For the American Institute for Conservation meeting, I propose a paper in three parts. First, to describe the philosophy behind VisColl: that, rather than writing formuals and drawing diagrams by hand, it is more efficient and effective to describe a book in a structured way and then use that to create formulas, diagrams, and other visualizations. Having a structured description means one can revisit the information later and create new visualizations, and even consider entire collections. Second, to give a demo of VisColl in action: I will build a simple model and create some visualizations to illustrate how VisColl works. Third, to discuss how VisColl, a tool that was created initially for faculty scholars (who may be able to spend many hours considering the construction of a single book, a privilege most many others don’t have) may be most effectively used by catalogers and conservators.

Speakers
avatar for Dot Porter

Dot Porter

Curator, Digital Research Services, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania
As Curator of Digital Research Services in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, Dot Porter participates in a wide-ranging digital humanities research and development team within the context of a special collections department. Dot's projects focus on the digitization... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

48. (Objects) Cristo de la Agonía – Restoration of a polychromatic Sculpture
This work is a sample of the method used to restore the piece of Cristo de la Agonía – a polychromatic chalk sculpture. This piece belongs to the Cuban religious heritage. This piece enhances the San José Chapel altar located in Regla, Havana, Cuba. The restoration process of the sculpture was developed in a private restoration workshop by employing conservation and restoration experts. It was not possible to make laboratory material tests due to the private nature of the workshop. Then it was necessary to appeal to the knowledge and experience gathered in this kind of labors, bibliographic studies and the experience gathered by using suitable materials proved in the restoration world. This a 130 x 745 cm sculpture representing an almost naked crucified Jesus, looking toward the sky. Jesus was characterized with a long hair waved dark chestnut hair. He shows bleeding injuries beneath the ribbon at the right side of the chest, in his brow due to the crown of thorns and hands and feet for being nailed to the cross. In the sculpture prevails the sienna colors related to the skin and hair, sky blue color by showing whips traces and red for the injuries above mentioned. The cross resembles a rustic tree trunk showing in the upper part of it a wooden poster saying INRI. The condition of conservation of the sculpture was bad. The sculpture backing is made of compacted chalk, being the left arm fragmented into pieces. It presents a fine layer of white preparation composed by calcium sulphate or calcium carbonated compacted by animal glue. It presented detachment and exfoliations being located the most serious ones at the left thigh in the image chest and in the back part of the head. The crown of thorns taking part of the head structure. It is found the lack of some thorns because it can be observed the holes where they were placed. The cross is made of wood with little carved stems joined in a symmetrical way upon its all surface missing only one stem from the left horizontal trunk. The INRI poster does not present aging signs. Visual tests and exploratory probes show that the bottom of the poster was painted by acrylic paints. After studying the given results, we may say that visual observation constituted the first approach to work complexity. Analysis of the different layers was developed using these means giving the necessary information about the condition of conservation. It was also determinate the method and materials to use for developing an appropriate restoration process regarding the original material that made up this work and the suitable use and utilizing the new material in the restoration process, main factor in the good results obtained.

Speakers
avatar for Luis Alberto Hernández Armas

Luis Alberto Hernández Armas

Technician of Restoration of Cultural Heritage., Cuba
TDB


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

49. (Architecture) Steam Heat: Use of high heat/ low pressure cleaning system on 19th century funerary monuments at Green-Wood Cemetery
During the spring of 2016 Green-Wood Cemetery and the Kärcher company began a collaboration under the company's cultural heritage program. Kärcher is a leader in the European pressure washer and steam cleaning world, this project was their first in the United States. Two mausoleums and one large monument were chosen for cleaning. All monuments were white american marble, most likely from the east coast. All exhibited deterioration and soiling due to biological growth, gypsum crust build up and lack of routine maintenance. After small tests were completed in March of 2016 Kärcher teamed up with Green-Wood to complete all the cleanings in May of 2016. The cleanings took approximately seven days. The steam machine was originally formulated to clean large engines and other industrial components, however its gentle pressure and lack of chemicals makes it a unique conservation tool. Green-Wood was able to gain on site knowledge of the steam cleaning methods as well as low pressure abrasive techniques to continue the conservation efforts after Kärcher returned to Germany. This presentation will follow the Green-Wood restoration team and the Kärcher specialists through the conservation of the three monuments, describe the testing methods, best practices in the field, trouble shooting, and next steps.

Speakers
GS

Georg Shmid

Conservator
Georg Shmid is a conservator with the firm AeDis in Germany. He assisted the Karcher team with the testing and treatment plans for the Green-Wood Cemetery project.
avatar for Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Manager of Restoration and Preservation, Green-Wood Cemetery
Neela K. Wickremesinghe joined the Green-Wood team during fall 2016. Ms. Wickremesinghe holds MS in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation.


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

5. (Objects) Preserving the Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Leatherface
The mask used in the 1974 horror classic, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, is housed in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas Austin. The mask was made from a latex rubber and meant to resemble human flesh – a grisly prize of the film’s cannibalistic villain. Over time, the mask has become fragile and brittle, losing its original flexibility. It was determined that a supportive mount should be made in an effort to improve long term storage and display options. However, the mask could not withstand the pressure of most traditional casting materials which could be used to obtain the interior topography of the mask. By exploring the uses of photogrammetry, laser scanning, 3D digital modeling and 3D printing, we were able to create a support for the mask. The digital model of the underside of the mask was printed and a support was made using the 3D print out rather than the original mask. In doing so, we made a custom mount for the fragile mask without the risks involved with excessive handling.

Speakers
MB

Morgan Burgess

Conservation Graduate Student, UCLA/Getty Conservation MA Program
Morgan Burgess graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2012 with a BA in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History and a minor in Studio Art. She was introduced to conservation as an undergraduate at the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project: Poggio Colla Field School where... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Olivia Primanis

Olivia Primanis

Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center
Olivia Primanis is the Senior Book Conservator at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, where she performs conservation treatments and manages the book lab and special projects. She is interested in general conservation and preservation subjects relating to library and mu... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

50. (Sustainability) Preservation of musical instrument, case study of baroque timpani used at the Tokyo Music School
This paper shows an example of preservation of a so-called living cultural property of which the significance exists in its history which has used as one of the first Western musical instruments in Japan. In the beginning of Meiji-era (1868-1912), Japan has actively adopted Western culture for the first time in its history. A national slogan entitled Fukoku-kyohei was went ahead with far-reaching policies to enrich the state and to catch up with the West. The effect of modernism extended over to education as well, the Tokyo Music School Orchestra (today called the Geidai Philharmonic Orchestra, Tokyo) was established meanwhile by a German conductor August Junker in 1899, as the first full-scale orchestra in Japan. Abundant musical instruments were prepared at the time of establishment, one of which is the object of this study: a pair of baroque timpani sent from Junker, discovered recently in Tokyo, from a private house of timpanist. Authors have been proceeding historical, practical and scientific studies of the timpani. The timpani were found in the private house of Makoto Ariga, timpanist and professor emeritus at the Tokyo University of the Arts. Stamps on copper-made bodies say the instruments were sent by Junker to the Tokyo Music School (present Tokyo University of the Arts) in 1904. Historical study by authors revealed that the timpani were known to be played from 1904 mainly at the Sogakudo Concert Hall, the oldest Western-style concert hall in Japan and today designated as an Important Cultural Property of Japan. The timpani were afterwards preserved at the house of Ariga and it had been used occasionally by his students and children for more than 45 years until today. Simply thanks to enough sufficient maintenance of Ariga, present conservation states of the timpani are relatively favorable, required only a maintenance of the head leather. Continuous usage allowed the instrument allowed to keep its enough high-quality sound which even be able to endure today’s whole concert. In order to preserve the cultural property itself active and to succeed the historical significance to the future generation, a project to hold a concert using the timpani rose up at the Tokyo University of the Arts, which will be actualized in October 2017. The presentation will be focused on historical study of timpani, scientific analysis of the material, and the process of organizing concert.

Speakers
MY

Mamiko Yasuda

Research Associate, Tokyo University of the Arts
Mamiko Yasuda is currently a research associate at the Tokyo University of the Arts. As an art conservator, she has worked extensively on a wide range of projects and research including the Matsukata collection study with the National Museum of Western Art. Her current research i... Read More →

Co-Authors
MH

Midori Hidaka

The co-author has been studied restoration and conservation of mural painting for more than 10 years. After graduating from the graduate school of cultural properties at the Tokyo University of the Arts, gained experiences of restoration technique and scientific analyses at the O... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

51. (Collection Care) An inexpensive and visually appealing solution to environmentally based distortions in limp vellum bindings
The Sutro Library is an important but neglected collection of ancient and modern materials which began as the personal collection of Adolph Sutro. In his life, he had intended to bestow upon the citizens of San Francisco a university level research library for their own edification. A populist by nature, he envisioned no special permissions or qualifications as being prerequisite to accessing the transformative powers of history, science, art, architecture, literature and languages. During his life he was unable to construct a building tfor his impressive collection, which at the time of his death was reputed to include the largest privately held collection of incunabula, First through Fourth Folios of William Shakespeare, Yemenite Hebrew scrolls, and expansive collections of English, American, German and Mexican pamphlets. During the dissolution of his estate his library, or what remained of it after having suffered significant loss in the 1906 earthquake and fire, was bequeathed to the California State Library. As a publicly accessible institution, this would ensure that no barriers to access would exist. An additional provision that the materials never be permanently housed outside the city limits of San Francisco would guarantee accessibility to the residents of the city which he loved and had so deeply impacted. Unfortunately, without an existing edifice in San Francisco that stipulation caused no end of difficulty for the State Library which is located about 90 miles away in the State Capital. The collection found temporary homes in four different locations during its first hundred years. As the precious offer of space which had been extended through the kindness of strangers would be rescinded, and a new location would have to be found again and again, a permanent location was finally found in 2012. The quality and suitability of temporary locations varied widely. From dirt floors in basements to damp temporary structures the collections have suffered tremendously due to poor storage conditions. Inappropriate shelving, inadequate housing and inconsistent environmental controls have resulted in distinct damage to many of the most important collections. One example is the effect of out-of-control relative humidity upon the Tlatelolco collection, which contains approximately 800 15th - 19th century volumes with the bulk of the 15th - 17th century imprints bound in vellum. Distortion is rampant. With the installation of a new Director this problem was prioritized. She identified the Tlatelolco collection as a source of both historical and visual importance for potential donors, and wanted a housing structure which would allow the limp vellum to be seen on the shelves. Due to the geographic distance between the materials and our Preservation department in Sacramento the work would need to be done on-site. Due to the number of items and low staffing the housing project would need to be completed with the help of student workers. Available funds for housing materials would be limited and the structure would need to be safe in accommodating various other types of damage such as torn covers. This poster will describe the proposed solution and workflow.

Speakers
CW

Colyn Wohlmut

Librarian, Sutro Library, California State Library
Colyn Wohlmut is a Librarian at the Sutro Library, California State Library. While working as a curatorial assistant at the Stanford University Libraries, she earned her MLIS from San José State University in 2009. Her active study of bookbinding inspired her to pursue a MA in C... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

6. (Book and Paper) Ain’t No Mountain High Enough: Treatment of a board game with iron corrosion
While trained to work with different types of materials, conservators are sometimes presented with composite objects that are outside their area of expertise. The Newberry Library has some unusual board games in their collection that aren’t always made out of materials a book conservator is accustomed to. The Newberry recently acquired the 1955 board game Mt. Everest that includes a 3-dimentional folding mountain for the game board, designed so that magnets in the playing pieces stick to the board as the players “climb” the mountain. While this was an innovative idea at the time, the long term consequences of layering an iron sheet in the middle of the board were not considered. Now that the iron in the board is rusty, the board is delicate. The mountain is flaking apart at the corners and appears to have staining due to chemical reactions between the paper and iron. Stains are also present in portions of the box that were in contact with the board. The presence of iron precludes treatment with water as migration of iron ions would be detrimental over time, and the board would not survive an attempt to wash and chelate the rusted metal. Book and paper conservators usually work with iron in the form of iron gall ink or impurities left in the paper from contaminated water. While many lessons are transferable to this situation, most of the treatment procedures are not. Local objects conservators with experience working with metallic iron will be consulted for their experience treating corroded iron. The Newberry’s mission is to preserve items while also making them accessible to the public in the reading room. Particularly delicate items are more difficult to treat because they may be used more than would be ideal for their preservation. The condition of the board prevents patrons from assembling the original mountain without damage. In order to preserve the original, a facsimile will be created using archival materials so that library users can still get an idea of how the game was designed. The poster will focus on the tradeoffs between the need to preserve the game and allow researchers to experience the game using as many of the original components as possible. It will also explain the treatment conducted on the original (incorporating collaborative expertise) and the methods and materials used in constructing the facsimile.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Calcote

Lauren Calcote

Collections Conservator, The Newberry Library
Lauren Calcote is a 2012 graduate of the Art Conservation Department at Buffalo State College specializing in books and a 2015 graduate of the North Bennet Street School Bookbinding program. She completed fellowships at the Boston Athenaeum and the University of Michigan and inte... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

7. (Collection Care) Cadmium Plating in Scientific and Technological Collections
Cadmium plating is a common surface treatment that has been used to protect iron alloys in military, automotive, aerospace, and other industrial fields throughout the 20th century. Cadmium is in limited use today due to its toxicity. The surface coating industry and military have made efforts to find suitable, safer alternatives, but none can replace the combination of cadmium’s unique characteristics as a single, cost-effective plating system. Cadmium serves as a sacrificial layer that preferentially corrodes before the substrate. The yellow- and white-colored corrosion products are loose and powdery thereby posing health and safety risks to those who come into contact with them. During a survey of the collection at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), more than 2100 objects were identified as having active cadmium corrosion and in need of immediate stabilization. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of information on how to identify, characterize, treat, and safely dispose of cadmium corrosion in the Conservation and Collections Management literature. While the dangers and deterioration of cadmium pigments have been explored in analysis of painted surfaces, to date only one conservation-focused article has endeavored to understand why metallic cadmium corrodes in technological collections. The limited, yet continued, use of cadmium in military and aerospace applications will continue to be problematic as NASM and other history and technology museums continue to collect. This poster will present the case study of a treatment methodology carried out on World War II era aircraft equipment. It will also present techniques for characterizing cadmium corrosion and provide practical health and safety guidelines for its treatment and disposal.

Speakers
avatar for Arianna Carini

Arianna Carini

Engen Conservation Fellow, National Air and Space Museum
Arianna Carini received her BA in Fine Art from Alfred University in upstate New York and her MSc in Conservation Practice from Cardiff University in Cardiff, Wales. Her interests include analytical research, contemporary materials, and health and safety. She is currently an Enge... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lauren Horelick

Lauren Horelick

Object Conservator, National Air and Space Museum
Lauren Horelick has a BFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute, a BA in art conservation and anthropology from the University of Delaware, and an MA in archaeological and ethnographic conservation from University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)/Getty Conservation... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

8. (Collection Care) Mercuric Chloride Reduction on Feathers
Pesticides have historically been used in the museum environment to prevent, repel, destroy or mitigate pests in order to preserve collections. Many of these compounds, particularly heavy metal pesticides, are toxic to humans as well as pests (Pool et al. 2005). While heavy metal pesticides are no longer used in the museum environment their presence is acutely felt within collections as they do not dissipate and remain on treated artifacts (that may not be labeled as such), which can cross contaminate adjacent object (ibid). What might be more concerning, handling items treated with heavy metal pesticides presents a potential risk to those in contact with these collections. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to analyze feathers treated with mercuric chloride on twentieth century Kachina figures from the Buffalo Museum of Science. Six feathers were selected for treatment and three pesticide mitigation methods were compared. Two sample sets were solvent cleaned on a vacuum suction platen; one set with ethanol and the other with isopropyl alcohol. Another set was washed in a deionized water bath. The feathers, used blotters and wash water were analyzed to evaluate the movement of the mercuric chloride and effectiveness of these meditation methods.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Cashman

Stephanie Cashman

Third Year Graduate Student in Art Conservation, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State
Stephanie Cashman is a current student in the SUNY Buffalo State Art Conservation Master’s Program where she is specializing in objects conservation. She is completing her third-year internship at the National Museum of the American Indian. During her time in graduate school, S... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Aaron Shugar

Aaron Shugar

Professor of Conservation Science, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department at SUNY Buffalo State
Aaron N. Shugar joined the department in January 2006 as our new conservation scientist, focusing on inorganic chemistry. Aaron comes to us from the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute, where he was a visiting scientist. He also served as Co-Director of the Archaeometallurg... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

3:30pm

9. (Book and Paper) An Experimental Gel-Based Treatment of Iron Gall Ink Corrosion Halos: Sodium Metabisulfite and Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid Solution in Agarose Gel
A research project was carried out at Queen’s University to determine the effectiveness of an agarose gel-based treatment of iron gall ink corrosion halos using reducing agent sodium metabisulfite and chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid. The ink fabricated for this experiment contained the metal ions of iron, copper, and zinc to increase the amount of visible corrosion, as well as replicate historic inks that have metals other than iron in them. The experimental treatment accounts for the chelation of the copper and zinc ions from the paper substrate along with iron, which cannot currently be done using the widely accepted calcium phytate treatment, as phytate is iron selective. The effectiveness of this experimental treatment was primarily determined using qualitative methods of analysis. Photographic documentation, ultraviolet fluorescence, optical microscopy, scanning election microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis were the techniques that yielded the most useful results. Color spectrophotometry and pH measurements of the sample swatches yielded results that support observations made with the aforementioned techniques. Unfortunately, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, the main technique that would have confirmed the success of the treatment, did not yield results because of unknown error. Though no definite conclusions could be drawn on the effectiveness of the treatment, suggestions for future research and potential treatment procedures can be considered based on the results from the qualitative analyses.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Conlin

Kelly Conlin

Graduate Student, Queen's University
Kelly Conlin is a recent graduate of Queen's University's Art Conservation Program where she was a student in their Science Stream. At the Association for North American Graduate Programs in Conservation's annual meeting she gave an oral presentation of her preliminary research f... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Rosaleen Hill

Rosaleen Hill

Program Director & Assistant Professor, Paper, Photographic Materials and New Media Conservation, Queen's University
Rosaleen Hill is Director and Assistant Professor - Paper Conservation, Photographic Materials and New Media for the Art Conservation Program at Queen's University. Her research interests are broad and include a partnership with the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation in the developme... Read More →
avatar for Alison Murray

Alison Murray

Associate Professor, Conservation Science, Queen's University, Art Conservation Program
Alison Murray is the Associate Professor of Conservation Science for the Art Conservation Program at Queen's University. She is conducting a research program for characterizing and conserving modern materials, including acrylic paints and grounds; this research integrates informa... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Evaluation of Organosilicon Materials for Conservation of Ancient Grey Bricks
Grey bricks were produced manually and used as the major traditional building materials in ancient China. However, the characteristics of grey bricks make them vulnerable to water, salt and other environmental factors. Organosilicon materials, such as ethyl silicate, organosiloxanes, and silicone resin, have been tested as the effective protective materials for silicate based stones. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of different organosilicon materials on grey bricks by total and half immersions. The penetration depths, appearance alterations, water adsorptions, hydrophobic properties and compressive strengths were measured after the treatments. The samples were also experienced the salt solution immersion, freeze-thaw and UV aging tests to evaluate the durability of different conservation treatments. It is found that different characteristics of the organosilicon materials lead to different conservation performances, such as water repellence, consolidation effect and durability. But it remains difficult to determine an appropriate material for the conservation of ancient architecture built with grey bricks.

Co-Authors
ZF

Zhengrong Fu

research fellow, Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology
Research fellow at Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology.
CM

Chenglei Meng

research fellow, Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology
Research fellow at Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology.
JM

Jie Mi

Student, Zhejiang University
Undergraduate of Zhejing University, majoring in cultural heritage and museology.
XW

Xiaozhen Wang

Student, Zhejiang University
Undergraduate of Zhejing University, majoring in cultural heritage and museology.
HZ

Hui Zhang

Associate professor, Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China
Associate Professor,Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China. Mainly reasch about organic chemical synthesis

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Book and Paper) Chancery Master Exhibits - piecing it back together
The focus of this paper is the conservation of a17th c. map damaged by water and iron gall ink. Triggered by a document request for the Victoria County History project, archivist Amanda Bevan discovered the bad condition of a 17th c. map, which is of great historical interest. The map is part of a group of objects (C 110 64-67) dating from the mid-15th c. to the 18th c., which all had been evidence material in a court case: In his will, Samuel Travers dedicated the proceeds from the sale of his land to the establishment of a foundation for poor naval lieutenants. Travers’ will became the subject of much dispute and litigation and the trust relating to the Naval Knights was not validated until 26 July 1793, almost seventy years after his death. The map appears to have been worked with to the extent of its material failing, which led to the production of an 18th c. copy. The transfer process of the ink drawings involved pricking through the paper onto the new support. The map also shows staining from water damage, which would have contributed to the breakdown and removal of the adhesive holding the lining to the paper and exacerbated the iron gall ink damage. The three factors together, the iron gall ink degradation, the pricking and the water damage, led to the paper delaminating in fragments like a jigsaw. New treatment approaches for iron gall ink damage included the use of gels and a heat mat. This conservation project is a reflexion of recent developments in paper and book conservation at TNA's Collection Care Department. It included the identification of materials and the development of tailored conservation treatments with the help of the conservation scientists. It required historical research provided by the archivists and non-TNA historians. As a result, the map is being used as a case study for in-house training and for various outreach events. In the newly created position of the Senior Conservation Manager for Single Object Treatments I have been focussing on high profile documents and conservation challenges and directing the development and adaptation of new treatment methods. The present conservation project lent itself to contribute to TNA’s conservation skill development programme and to improve the organisation’s conservation methodology for single objects.

Speakers
avatar for Sonja Schwoll-[ACR]

Sonja Schwoll-[ACR]

Senior Conservation Manager - Treatment Single Objects, The National Archives
Sonja Schwoll ACR (Icon, UK) is Senior Conservation Manager – Treatment Single Objects at The National Archives. Previously, Sonja was Subject Leader for the Conservation of Books and Library Materials Programme at West Dean College and Associate Lecturer on the MA Conservation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Lora Angelova

Dr. Lora Angelova

Conservation Scientist, The National Archives, Kew
Lora Angelova is a Conservation Scientist at The National Archives, Kew. She obtained a PhD in chemistry from Georgetown University in conjunction with the scientific research department of National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC and has carried out research into gel cleaning of... Read More →
RM

Rose Mitchell

Map Archivist, The National Archives
Rose Mitchell has for many years been map archivist at The National Archives of the United Kingdom and an historian of cartography.  She is co-author of Maps: their untold stories (Bloomsbury, 2014) and has written and given talks on a broad range of map-related topics based on... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Collection Care) Making the Most of What You Have: Digital Documentation Solutions Utilizing Existing Software
Documentation is an important aspect of a conservator’s work and is essential for communication between conservators in the present and the future. While vital, documentation using traditional methods can also be very time consuming, when time is an ever more limited commodity. In an effort to streamline the documentation process, conservators at the Saint Louis Art Museum (SLAM) have implemented a process for digital condition reporting using Microsoft OneNote and tablet computers. While a number of options for digital condition reporting have presented themselves in recent years, these tend to rely on specialized software or apps and are often restricted to a single type of operating system. By using Microsoft OneNote, already a part of the museum’s IT infrastructure, and tablet PCs the conservation department has been able to improve the efficiency of documentation processes without purchasing additional software or placing undue burden on SLAM’s IT department. This paper will focus on the genesis and implementation of digital condition reporting at SLAM using Microsoft OneNote, including an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the process. The potential for further applications of Microsoft OneNote for collections documentation will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Raina Chao

Raina Chao

Associate Objects Conservator, Saint Louis Art Museum
Raina Chao is the Associate Objects Conservator at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Previously she was the 2012-2015 Andrew W. Mellon fellow in Objects Conservation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the 2011-2012 Graduate Intern in Decorative Arts and Sculpture Conservation at the... Read More →
avatar for L. H.(Hugh) Shockey-[PA]

L. H.(Hugh) Shockey-[PA]

Head of Conservation | Objects Conservator, Saint Louis Art Museum
L. H. (Hugh) Shockey Jr. MS, AIC-PA is Head of Conservation and Object Conservator at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Previously he was the objects conservator at the Lunder Conservation Center of the Smithsonian American Art Museum where he performed treatment on electronic media an... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Mike Peters

Mike Peters

System Administrator, Saint Louis Art Museum
Mike Peters is a past System Administrator in the IT department at the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Electronic Media) Sounds Challenging: Documenting the Identity and Iterations of Ragnar Kjartansson's "The Visitors"
This talk demonstrates the application of a documentation framework for the aural elements in media installation art that the speaker presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting. The focus of this case study is "The Visitors" by Ragnar Kjartansson, a work jointly owned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. It was recently installed for the "Soundtracks" exhibition at SFMOMA. This large-scale, nine-channel video performance piece has been exhibited worldwide to great acclaim. The setting of the work is a stately, aged mansion in rural upstate New York. The artist gathered fellow musicians there in 2012 to perform an original composition with lyrics inspired by the writings of the poet and performance artist Ásdís Sif Gunnarsdóttir, his ex-wife. One of the themes in the work is the break-up of their marriage, giving the piece tremendous emotional range which has a corresponding broad dynamic range in terms of sound. The piece involves vocals and numerous musical instruments including two pianos, drums, electric and acoustic guitars, bass, banjo, accordion, and cello, as well as the sounds of the natural landscape, punctuated by two cannon blasts. Life-sized video projections of the individual musicians encircle the audience, whose experience ranges from contemplation of the solo performers to immersion in the music of the entire ensemble. This case study highlights the importance of collaboration between conservators and sound engineers, both within the institution and, where applicable, in the artist's studio. Central to the conservation documentation of the aural aspects of "The Visitors" was an in-depth interview with the artist's director of sound, Christopher W. McDonald. This talk will cover the identity of the work, including both its aural and visual aspects, characterization and assessment of the digital files, significant properties of audiovisual equipment and the acoustic environment, and documentation of the iteration at SFMOMA. Various methods, challenges, and limitations of documenting sound will be discussed, along with future directions for this research, including the further development of the framework and terminology for sound art documentation.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Brost

Amy Brost

Assistant Media Conservator, Museum of Modern Art
Amy Brost is an art conservator living in Brooklyn. She is currently Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Media Conservation at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York. In 2016, she earned an M.A. in the History of Art and Archaeology and an M.S. in Conservation of Historic and Artistic... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Objects) Loss Compensation on Ceramics using Photogrammetry, Digital Modeling and 3D Printing
This paper will describe some tools for producing detailed, 3D printed restorations for ceramics that may also be applicable to other areas of conservation. Photogrammetry is a 3D imaging process that is relatively easy to do with standard photography equipment in the conservation lab, provided one has a computer with a sufficient processing capability. Agisoft PhotoScan was used to create three dimensional mesh models of several different ceramics that were in need of restoration. The project involved experimentation with available 3D modeling and sculpting programs. Autodesk Meshmixer, a free software system, was selected to digitally ”sculpt” and process the meshes for a 3D print in resin. The finished resin parts were then easily attached to the body of the ceramic and painted using conventional methods. The ceramics in this study include a small Meissen porcelain with a missing right hand and eyeglass lens, a 12th century Persian ceramic with a missing handle, and an 18th century English delftware posset pot lacking sculptural elements on the lid. The use of 3D printed parts resolved a variety of problems commonly found in ceramic restoration, such as complex and simple modeling, shiny glazed surfaces, achieving fine detail on very small elements, mirroring of meshes to create a right hand from a digital model of the left, and the need for precise joins on complex break edges. While the learning curve for using these programs is steep, familiarity makes the operator more efficient, and there are a number of advantages to printing these restorations instead of using conventional techniques. First of all, handling of the artifact is dramatically reduced, an important safety factor. Conventional modeling and casting of very small detailed parts, such as a missing porcelain hand, is challenging for many, and may require some creative interpretation by the conservator. However, with digital models, it is possible to provide a more “authentic” restoration. For example, a missing left hand can be created and articulated from a digital mesh model of the right hand. Thus, the restored right hand, as a mirror image of the original left hand, could be considered a closer iteration of the artist’s intent. It is also very easy to create a digital mesh of the “stump” or break edges of the ceramic and use this to make a nearly perfect match in the printed restoration. One practical and timesaving advantage is that much of the imaging and printing work can be subcontracted to volunteers, students or contractors who have specialized digital skills. Sharing the highly accurate digital models based on laser scanning or photogrammetry will also make similar examples by the same artist or workshop easier to share, either for the purpose of loss compensation or study. The digital files are also available for future research. Finally, the use of 3D digital models allows for experimentation that is helpful in discussing positioning and articulation of restorations with curators. The techniques discussed here are likely to have applications beyond ceramic restoration.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen M. Garland-[Fellow]

Kathleen M. Garland-[Fellow]

Senior Conservator, Objects, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kathleen M. Garland received her BA in Art History from Brown University, and her MA in Art Conservation from the State University of New York, Cooperstown. She completed her internship in the Sculpture Conservation Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. From 198... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Spence

Stephanie Spence

Conservation Fellow, Toledo Museum of Art
Stephanie Spence received her M.A. and Certificate of Advanced Study from the Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State College, State University of New York where she specialized in objects conservation, with interests in Asian lacquer and metals. Stephanie received her B.A. in... Read More →

Co-Authors
RB

R. Bruce North

Conservation Department Volunteer, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
R. Bruce North received his BS in Ocean Engineering from Florida Institute of Technology and his MS in Civil Engineering from the University of Houston. He retired from a career in Structural Engineering and Project Management and is currently providing volunteer assistance to th... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Paintings) Unusual activities between image and panel: a sixteenth-century painting of St. Catherine in the Yale University Art Gallery
In his 1916 catalogue of the James Jackson Jarves collection, the art historian Osvald Sirén considered a small painting  of St. Catherine of Siena and remarked that the picture “...has lost a good deal of its pictorial bouquet.” His sympathetic but dismissive words are one of the only published statements on this painting, which dates to sixteenth-century Siena and after a series of attributions is now being reconsidered as a late work of Sodoma. Overlooked by the mid-twentieth century cleaning campaign that affected the majority of the Italian paintings at Yale, the painting remained understudied until the fall of 2016, when it was pulled from storage for conservation treatment and analysis. The resulting project uncovered an unusual relationship between the image formed by the paint film and the support beneath it, which in turn became a determining factor in the treatment the painting received. Questions concerning how the image layer relates to the support immediately arose when examination of the painting began. X-radiography, followed by computerized tomography (CT) scanning, confirmed that worm tunnels had been filled with a radio-opaque material from the front of the panel, not the reverse. This observation establishes that the painting was either transferred to its present support, painted on an old, previously worm-eaten piece of wood, or painted on paper then mounted to old wood. The possibility of a transfer seemed, initially, most likely: no trace of paper has yet been found, the ground varies markedly in thickness as it extends across the panel, and certain areas of paint appear to rest directly on a thick, glue-like layer. However, the CT scan also confirmed that all but two of the largest disruptions to the surface of the painting correspond directly to knots in the present panel. Such connections between panel and paint film indicates that the support has long induced damage to the image it holds—an observation in tension with the aforementioned indications that the two materials were not always attached to one another. The working provisional explanation for the fraught relationship between image and panel is as follows: at a date prior to the painting’s purchase by Jarves in roughly 1850, the image layer was temporarily separated from the panel. The exposed face of the panel was coated with the observed radio-opaque material, and the image layer was re-glued to its original support, in what could be named an “auto-transfer.” The paper will explore this possibility alongside others. Precedents within the transfer literature will be described, including a little-discussed 1751 reference to an auto-transfer technique. Since the potential St. Catherine auto-transfer has a terminus post quem of 1850, this example could complicate the prevalent notion that nineteenth-century restorers considered the essence of the work of art to reside only in the image layer. The role that the uncertain structural history of the St. Catherine panel played in its concurrent conservation treatment, particularly in guiding the selective cleaning approach used to thin the multiple, unevenly discolored coatings on its surface, will be presented in tandem.

Speakers
avatar for Annika Finne

Annika Finne

PhD student, Institute of Fine Arts New York University
Annika Finne received a M.A. in Art History and an M.S. in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, with a speciality in paintings conservation, from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2016. She is currently a Robert Lehman Fellow for Graduate Study in th... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Irma Passeri

Irma Passeri

Senior Conservator of Paintings, Yale University Art Gallery
Irma Passeri is Senior Paintings Conservator at the Yale University Art Gallery. She received her degree in the Conservation of Easel Paintings from the Conservation School of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, in Florence in 1998. Prior to working for the Yale Art Gallery, she work... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Finding a Balance: Conservation of the Dolley Madison Cased Image from the Greensboro History Museum
Cased images differ significantly from conventional forms of paper-based photography. The daguerreotype is distinguished by its metallic composition: a thin copper plate with a highly polished silver surface was vulnerable to marring, abrasion, scratches, tarnish, rust, and corrosion. As a result, cases were constructed from decoratively covered wood or ornamentally molded thermoplastic to protect these fragile images. Conservation of these cased images is complicated. Not only is one dealing with a photographic image but also with leather, velvet, wood, plastic, cloth, metal, glass, and varnish. As a conservator it is important that the conservation and preservation approaches find a balance between the photographic image and its traditional housing. Using the Dolley Madison cased image from The Greensboro History Museum, as an example, this talk will discuss the conservation of the daguerreotype plate and its severely compromised gold stamped blue velvet case that was created in the semblance of a book. Adopting techniques and materials from book conservation as well as objects conservation, the cover was reattached, the spine was repaired and modified to create a safer opening of the case, and missing tray components were recreated using traditional water gilding techniques on wood.

Speakers
avatar for Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Senior Photograph Conservator, NEDCC
Monique Fischer has specialized in the conservation of photographic materials since 1994. In collaboration with the Image Permanence Institute, she was awarded a Technical Achievement Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1997 for the development of A-D St... Read More →
avatar for Terra Huber-[PA]

Terra Huber-[PA]

Assistant Paper Conservator, NEDCC
Terra Huber has studied and worked in the field of conservation since 2009. They are currently an Assistant Paper Conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center and have completed internships at The Newberry Library, the Walters Art Museum, the Boston Athenaeum, the Hi... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) A sizable sooty soiled surface: Analyzing and evaluating methods for surface cleaning a large painted muslin
Throughout the documentation and treatment of an unusually large painted muslin, analytical methods helped to both characterize the object, and evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. Displayed at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, the muslin painted by Strike the Kettle (Lakota), a follower of Sitting Bull, depicts multiple scenes including gift giving, cooking, and warriors on horseback. The muslin was treated for the major long-term exhibition, Americans, at the National Museum of the American Indian. Previous extended display in the industrial urban centers of Chicago and New York City resulted in heavy, sooty, lead-containing surface soiling. Prominent tar-like stains in the center had haloed tidelines from an earlier treatment attempt. Pigments, binder, and stain residue were characterized using microscopy, portable x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), microscope-FTIR, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Analyses confirmed that common late 19th century trade pigments were used with a proteinaceous binder. All paint colors were evaluated for light stability using microfadeometry, revealing all but one were stable. The black stain was characterized as an oily resinous compound with surprisingly high lead levels. The treatment priority was to reduce the stain and its associated tideline, and disfiguring surface soiling. Vacuuming the muslin through Vellux fabric trapped significant soiling, however the visual impact was minimal requiring additional dry cleaning treatment. Of the four sponges evaluated, the vulcanized rubber soot sponge was most effective though somewhat abrasive based on cleaning tests, microscopy, FTIR, and pXRF. The need for multiple hands working simultaneously over a large surface area necessitated a systematic approach to ensure consistency. This cleaning methodology produced large quantities of heavily soiled Vellux and sponges, allowing for a thorough study of cleaning mechanisms and soiling characteristics. While the tar-like stain responded poorly to all solvents tested, ethanol and a suction platen successfully reduced the tidelines created by the previous treatment. The treatment methods dramatically improved the muslin’s appearance. Final pXRF analyses indicated the soot sponge was more effective at reducing overall lead levels than the use of a Vellux-covered vacuum alone. Portable XRF also detected lead levels on the used Vellux and soot sponges, but not the nitrile gloves, which had implications for material disposal as potential hazardous waste.

Speakers
SH

Susan Heald-[PA]

Textile Conservator, National Museum of the American Indian
Susan Heald has been the National Museum of the American Indian’s textile conservator since 1994, where she has supervised many pre-program interns and post-graduate fellows. Prior to NMAI, she served as the Minnesota Historical Society’s textile conservator, and wa... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nora Frankel

Nora Frankel

Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation, National Museum of the American Indian
Nora Frankel is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Past work includes positions at the Rijksmuseum, Burrell Collection, Death Valley National Park, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, an... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Gwénaëlle Kavich

Dr. Gwénaëlle Kavich

Conservation Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Gwénaëlle Kavich, Conservation Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute, earned a BSc in Chemistry from The Nottingham Trent University (U.K.) and a PhD in Chemical Sciences from the University of Pisa (Italy). She contributes to a wide range of technical stud... Read More →
avatar for Annaick Keruzec

Annaick Keruzec

Collections Contractor, Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum
Annaick Keruzec is a textile conservator who currently works at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum as a collections contractor working on a Quilt research project and collections documentation project. From 2015-2017 she was an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Smithsonian I... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Lam

Thomas Lam

Physical Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University. After his Ph.D, Thomas completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Thomas is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledg... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Little

Nicole Little

Physical Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Nicole Little is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum Conservation Institute. She received both her B.A. and M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Missouri-Columbia, where her master’s research dealt with the compositional analysis of Mayan ceram... Read More →
avatar for Megan Doxsey Whitfield

Megan Doxsey Whitfield

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Object Conservation, National Museum of the American Indian
Megan Doxsey-Whitfield is currently a Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation at the National Museum of the American Indian. She is a graduate of the Queen’s University Master of Art Conservation program (MAC ’15) and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from the University... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Preventive conservation training in the Moche Valley, Peru
The MOCHE, Inc. Conservation Field School in summer 2017 (Huanchaco, Peru) provided training in preventive conservation and collections care on archaeological sites to binational undergraduate, graduate, and pre-program students . This paper reports on the program, which, co-directed by an archaeologist and conservator, aimed to bridge the gaps between training for work in the field and for work in museum collections. The program provided the opportunity for students to gain an encompassing perspective of the life-history of material culture from excavation through processing and analysis, to storage and display. We believe this holistic perspective is essential for all cultural heritage professionals, yet training programs of this type are not always available. Participants came to the program with varying levels of skills and experience in archaeology and conservation. American students and Peruvian students from the Universidad Nacional de Trujillo worked together on excavated materials from the regional survey led by UNT's archaeology lab. The students participated in archaeological excavation, finds processing, and recording, working hands-on with finds from the current and previous field seasons. As part of program curriculum they also learned about and engaged in basic conservation and collections management principles and practices. This work complemented the field school’s instruction in the materials that make up the archaeological record and the prehistory of the north coast of Peru. Students used close observation of the project collections to understand how the objects were made and used, and identified modifications in the objects from initial use-life and those occurring during deposition and post-excavation. Students visited archaeological storage facilities in Peru and learned about principles of safe storage and packing for archaeological finds. At the close of the program, students carried out some of the proposed improvements for safe objects packing using appropriate materials and methods. The students also visited archaeological sites and museums throughout the region to understand the benefits and risks that tourism development brings to local communities. This program is part of MOCHE Inc’s broader heritage preservation efforts. MOCHE, INC (Mobilizing Opportunities for Community Heritage Empowerment, http://savethemoche.org/) is an organization founded by archaeologists dedicated to improving the standard of living in impoverished communities, preserving archaeological sites, and promoting research and education on the rich cultural heritage of Peru. MOCHE Inc.’s work over the past 20 years in Peru has demonstrated that close community ties and community-oriented projects go hand in hand with preserving archaeological sites. This project demonstrates that preventive conservation need not be narrowly construed as concerning only tasks such as managing museum and storage environments (of course very important topics on their own) but can also encompass a variety of other community engagement and education activities crucial to the goal of heritage preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Walthew

Jessica Walthew

Conservator, Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum
Jessica Walthew is an objects conservator at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum. Her research and teaching interests include theory and practice in archaeological and ethnographic conservation, best practices in documentation, and technical research in art history and ar... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Alicia Boswell

Alicia Boswell

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Cultures of Conservation, Bard Graduate Center/Metropolitan Museum of Art
I am an anthropological archaeologist whose research examines the dynamics of complex societies and interactions between PrenColumbian groups in different ecological zones of the Andes. My field research prioritizes examining the lived experience of household and producer communi... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Book and Paper) Peregrinations of an 18th-Century Armenian Prayer Scroll
Armenian prayer scrolls are Christian talismans used to protect bearers from harm, to promote healing of illness, and to ensure good fortune. Hmayil, the Armenian name for these scrolls, means “enchantment ” in Old Armenian. Early examples were manuscripts, but printed scrolls became common with the advent of movable type. There are three printed Armenian prayer scrolls in the collections of the Library of Congress. All were printed at about the same date, in the same city. All are illustrated, but the individual palettes used for coloring the woodcuts are very different. This presentation will focus on the recent conservation treatment of a severely damaged hmayil, and will highlight the complicated and precise procedures of the treatment and housing as well as the scientific analysis of the scroll. The hmayil was printed in Constantinople in 1729; the text was printed on European paper with movable type and the illustrations added as woodcuts. It is about 3.5 inches wide, but 15 feet long. When the Library received the scroll, it was broken into fourteen fragments of varying lengths despite evidence of several efforts to restore and repair it. Stains and surface dirt disfigured the paper and obscured the hand-colored illustrations. Given the size of the object and the labor intensive treatment needed, the conservators considered treatment materials and methods to determine a treatment process that would be both efficient and sustainable. In addition, they carefully organized the project to maintain consistency in procedures while retaining flexibility to respond to new challenges that might arise. The treatment employed materials relatively new to conservation and blended Western and Eastern conservation techniques. For example, fragments were washed on layers of non-woven polyester-cellulose cloth (Tekwipe®), chosen for its strong vertical capillary action and reusability. To stabilize fragments and reconstruct the original sequence of the scroll, primary and secondary linings of two different Asian papers were applied using a combination of traditional Asian and Western lining techniques. To dry the linings, conservators used both Japanese materials and methods for tensioned drying, as well as Western papermakers’ felts. Since the strength and flexibility of the paper did not permit returning the scroll into its original format, a Western method of storage and presentation - window mats – was used, but their structure was tailored to meet the special needs of the curator and researchers. The conservators investigated the colorants used in the scroll by non-destructive analytical techniques: multi-spectral imaging and X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The findings will be discussed in the presentation. The characterization also establishes a future direction for research by a multidisplinary team to compare different color palettes from the Library’s hmayils and the reference collection of Armenian pigments available to the Library, with the goal of contributing to the knowledge of historical Armenian artist’s materials.

Speakers
avatar for Xiaoping Cai

Xiaoping Cai

Pine Tree Foundation Fellow, The Morgan Library & Museum
Xiaoping Cai is currently the Pine Tree Foundation Rare Book Conservation fellow in the Thaw Conservation Center of the Morgan Library & Museum. Prior to the fellowship, she completed an Advanced Internship in Book Conservation at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. During... Read More →
avatar for Emily Williams

Emily Williams

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow, Conservation Centre for Art & Historic Artifacts
Emily obtained her bachelor’s degree in conservation from Camberwell College of Art, before receiving a postgraduate diploma in Art History from Courtauld Institute of Art, and a dual Master of Arts and Master of Science in conservation from University College London. Previous... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Sylvia Albro-[PA]

Sylvia Albro-[PA]

Senior Paper Conservator, Library of Congress
Sylvia Albro was graduated from the New York State University Graduate Program in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works in Cooperstown New York in 1982. She completed a graduate internship in conservation of works of art on paper at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisc... Read More →
avatar for Levon Avdoyan

Levon Avdoyan

Area Specialist for Armenia and Georgia, Library of Congress
Levon Avdoyan earned his MA, MPhil and PhD in Ancient History with a Minor in Armenian History and Civilization from Columbia University. After spending a year as a fellow at Dumbarton Oaks Center for Byzantine Studies in Georgetown, he joined the Library of Congress in 1977, fir... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Brostoff

Lynn Brostoff

Senior Research Scientist, Library of Congress
Lynn Brostoff has a Masters in Materials Science from the University of Cincinnati, and a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Lynn has worked as a conservation scientist for over 25 years at leading institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum o... Read More →
avatar for Claire Dekle

Claire Dekle

Senior Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Claire Dekle is a Senior Book Conservator at the Library of Congress. Her experience as a conservation liaison to the Manuscript Division of the Library, as well as her treatment responsibilities, rekindled an early interest in the conservation of iron-gall ink. She was a member... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Collection Care) How to Label Everything – A Review of Current Best Practices in Natural History Labelling
Natural history collections are used primarily for research by scientists and academics. These collections are continually growing to track information about species and populations in the natural world. These collections are often quite large and labels are fundamental to help distinguish one specimen from its similar looking neighbours. Labels in natural history collections often contain original information which is not recorded elsewhere in museum records and specimens without labels are generally regarded as having no research value. Labels should last as long as their associated specimens. Finding materials to ensure the archival properties for each element of the label, including paper, plastic, inks and adhesives, can be a daunting affair. At the Canadian Museum of Nature, we undertook a comprehensive review of our labelling protocols. The results have been disseminated on the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections wiki page on Best Practices for Labelling Natural History Collections. It addresses a tremendous range of labelling issues that can be easily adapted to other collections from inorganic to organic, microscopic to massive, and wet to dry to ultra-cold. The project’s aim was to improve the decision making about the selection and purchasing of labelling materials. We presented our results to maximize end user benefits. We identified three generalized natural history labelling scenarios: dry labels, wet labels and ultra-cold labels. For each scenario, we made a decision tree to clarify and highlight the logic behind the selection of certain materials. To facilitate purchasing of the best materials, we summarized key archival concepts, terms, and symbols used by commercial suppliers that curatorial staff are likely to encounter on supplier websites. We also summarized relevant industry and government standards relating to archival materials, which could be used to objectively evaluate materials. Finally, we summarized previously-developed simple testing protocols that could be used to evaluate purchased materials once acquired. Focusing on the end users, through decision trees to present key information to facilitate purchasing, has been well received and has great potential to be adapted to other categories of archival materials for which conservators make recommendations. This project also highlighted the challenges in making effective recommendations when new archival materials continue to be developed and adopted. As a profession, we therefore need to continue to have higher level discussions among all stakeholders including, but not limited to, manufacturers, purchasers, conservators, conservation scientists, and standards and testing organizations. A more comprehensive understanding of material science, industry standards and simple tests for archival quality will help collections care staff make informed decisions when selecting labeling materials.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Leckie

Carolyn Leckie

Conservator, Canadian Museum of Nature
Carolyn Leckie is a graduate from the Queen University Art Conservation program. Carolyn worked at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, the Canadian Conservation Institute, and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science before joining the Canadian Museum of Nature 10 years ago. S... Read More →

Co-Authors
LC

Luci Cipera

Conservator, Canadian Museum of Nature
Luci Cipera works as a conservator at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Luci joined the Canadian Museum of Nature in 2004 on the team responsible for moving the bird and mammal galleries during the museum’s renovation. She is a graduate of the Master of Art Conservation program at... Read More →
avatar for Erika Range

Erika Range

Conservation Technician, Canada Science and Technology Museum
Erika Range is an emerging cultural heritage professional and conservator. She completed her undergraduate degree from Trent University in Anthropology, graduating with high honours in 2008. She has also completed a master’s degree from University College London (2010) in Princ... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Electronic Media) VR tools as spatial documentation
As a Time-based media conservator at Tate, recent experience installing complex multi-channel sound pieces led me to think more deeply about how we install and document these types of artworks.

Our aim as conservators is to understand the display parameters of a work, defining whether visual and technical properties of equipment or space are conceptual or incidental. This influences our options for the preservation of an artwork. Acoustic aspects of a work have mostly related to specific equipment, or appropriate spaces for installation, but we do not currently capture information regarding the acoustic properties of a space, leading us to consider the questions we want to ask regarding the environment in which an artwork is installed.

In looking at the relationship between the aesthetics and the acoustics of space holistically, we can easily see how the design of a space becomes an intervention into a work: lessening the acoustic reflection of a space becomes a treatment. In comparison to video and visual works, where, as a community we have a rich and nuanced vocabulary to describe the work within a space and the treatments we might apply, the corresponding vocabulary and shared understanding of audio treatment feels frozen in a more primitive state. This is reflected by our documentation, which historically has been limited to text and pictorial representation. What if our documentation closer resembled the artwork medium?

In this presentation I would like to share our experimentation in practically applying current recording technologies to documentation, our exploration of it’s uses, limitations and dissemination. Starting with the technique of binaural recording, we are able to accurately capture the spatiality of sound within a space, and provide greater context by a point of view video recording, for viewing on a monitor or a VR headset for a more immersive experience. This can expand into spherical photos and videos, in which the wearer of a headset is able to freely look around a space.

Once virtual reality is introduced as a tool, it raises many questions about where accurate documentation ends and synthetic reconstruction begins, and for what purposes should the resulting documentation be used for? Given how easy it is to embed 360 files in a web browser to be viewed on a phone, should we be rethinking the idea of the viewing copy, or the thumbnail image?

In sharing this, I hope to raise questions around a potential new documentation framework, and also highlight a new and exciting area of ethics.

Speakers
avatar for Jack McConchie

Jack McConchie

Time-based media Conservator, Tate
Jack McConchie is a Time-based media conservator at Tate, responsible for installing works across all four Tate sites, as well as developing collection care and acquisition strategies. He graduated from the University of Glasgow in 2004 with a degree in Electronics and Music, bef... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Objects) The Use of 3D Printing for Casting Proportional Replicas Used in the Treatment of Articulated Skeletons
The anatomical accuracy of natural science specimens is important for their use in education and display. This case study explores the recreation of missing elements of an articulated brant goose skeleton (Branta bernicla) from a study collection in the Ornithology Department at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The articulated skeleton was treated during a course at the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (NYU). In current AMNH practice, molds taken from other specimens of the same species are often used to cast replacement elements missing from an articulated skeleton. However, the goose skeleton in this case study is larger than other brant specimens at the AMNH, so casts made in the usual way would not have been proportionally correct. To create replicas of the required size, the analogous bones from a smaller specimen were laser scanned at NYU’s LaGuardia Studio, a facility providing advanced digital media services to faculty, students, and visiting artists. The scans were enlarged using modeling software and then used to 3D-print a model of each bone. In order to ensure low cost with long-term stability, the printed models were then used to create silicone molds from which casts were made in a stable epoxy. This presentation will detail the options available for 3D scanning, file manipulation, and printing, with emphasis on cost, practicability, and long-term stability. Both the printing process and printing materials will be discussed. For this case study, the final cost was under $60 for the scanning and printing of five small bones. Including creating the second molds, the treatment required about 20 hours, spread over a few weeks. The lag time was mostly due to scheduling with the LaGuardia Studio rather than the necessity of the process. Combining digital technology with traditional mold-making techniques allowed for the more accurate calculation of shape and proportion of the bone replicas and the creation of highly detailed molds quickly and economically.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Haynes

Christine Haynes

Graduate Intern, IFA-NYU / Hirshhorn
CHRISTINE HAYNES is a fourth-year objects student at the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She is currently completing her graduate year internship at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. She has interned at the Metropolitan Museum of A... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Julia Sybalsky

Julia Sybalsky

Senior Associate Conservator, American Museum of Natural History
JULIA SYBALSKY is a Senior Associate Conservator of Natural Science Collections at the AMNH, where she began working in January 2010. Her work supports the care of scientific collections and materials on exhibit, as well as the assessment of risks to collections throughout the mu... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Paintings) Research and Conservation of Peter Paul Rubens, The Raising of the Cross, oil on paper, 1638
The Raising of the Cross, an oil painting on paper, was painted by Rubens for the production of an engraving by Jan Witdoeck and the image is based on the triptych of the same title, now in the Cathedral of our Lady in Antwerp and painted by Rubens in 1610-11. The sketch was acquired in 1928, as an 'oil on canvas' by the Art Gallery of Toronto as it was called, from the Holford Collection through Christie’s London. The painting was ‘cleaned’ by Thos. Agnew and Sons, London prior to the sale. Extensive restoration followed: first in 1937 in New York City and, after two thefts in 1954 and 1959, at the Art Gallery of Ontario. It is not known at what point the paper was lined to canvas but it is currently glue lined to cotton canvas. Restoration methods followed the traditions of painting conservation and the paper support at some point became obscured by extensive overpainting. Documentation and understanding of the work was essential to complex decisions of removal and the reconstruction of areas that suffered loss of form and detail. Interruptions in the surface tonality by discoloured retouchings and the discontinuity and flattening of form due to severe abrasion and loss of surface paint interfered with one’s appreciation of the work. Scientists at the Canadian Conservation Institute provided support in the initial investigations and at intervals in the treatment process by undertaking non-invasive x-ray fluorescence and analysis of samples as required. Samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, polarized light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry and, in one case, by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Infrared Reflectography (OSIRIS) was carried out by Rachel Billinge, National Gallery, London. Removal of restoration additions was challenging and time consuming and areas of ambiguity remain untouched. Recent work exposes at least some of the original intentions of the artist. Much of the paper support however modified in colour and texture, now contributes to the final image. The leached and damaged paint layers were minimally saturated with MS2A and retouching carried out with watercolour. The relationship of the sketch to the engraving and to the earlier painting will be discussed. Both informed the finish of the AGO painting. Several pentimenti remain visible and reveal the working method of the artist. The painting was reframed in a new frame to conceal the eight centimeter extension at the top border which is not by Rubens.

Speakers
avatar for Sandra Webster Cook

Sandra Webster Cook

Conservator of Paintings, Historical and Modern, Art Gallery of Ontario
Sandra Webster-Cook became an employee of the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in 1987. She is currently responsible for the conservation of the historical and modern paintings in the collection of the AGO. Her work on the Canadian Historical collection included research on the paint... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Kate Helwig

Kate Helwig

Senior Conservation Scientist, Canadian Conservation Institute, Canadian Conservation Institute
Kate Helwig has an honours B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Toronto and a Master’s degree in Physical Chemistry from Stanford University in California. She studied artifact conservation at Queen’s University and received a Master’s Degree in Art Conservation in 199... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alexandra (Sasha) Suda

Dr. Alexandra (Sasha) Suda

Curator European Art. Fraser Elliott Chair, Print & Drawing Council, Art Gallery of Ontario
Sasha Suda, who holds a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, joined the AGO in 2011 as Assistant Curator, European Art. She was promoted first to Associate Curator, European in 2013, then Curator and R. Fraser Elliott Chair, Print & Drawing Council in 2015, a... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

(Photographic Materials) Investigation of Portrait with Applied Oil Color
A small painted portrait of Carl Maria Von Weber on a wood support was treated at West Lake Conservators. Analysis confirmed the presence of a silver-based underlying image, bringing particular challenges to the treatment approach. The proposed presentation focuses on the analysis and investigation that was performed in the attempt to positively identify a photographic base and how it was ultimately inconclusive. The decision making process for the treatment that was carried out was informed by the possibility of the presence of a photographic print. High Energy Synchrotron Source XRF analysis confirmed and mapped the presence of silver which could signify either an underlying photographic print or a silver point drawing. Additional microscopy was carried out as well as cross-section analysis but the presence of a protein (gelatin or albumen) that would hone in on determining the presence of a photographic process could not be positively determined. As a private conservation practice, West Lake Conservators has limited access to analytical tools and data processing. After taking the analysis as far as possible through the generous collaboration of local institutions and colleagues, it was prescient to offer the private owner of the object an expedite and practical treatment proposal. Cleaning and consolidation treatment were carried out taking into consideration the possibility of an underlying photographic print with a water-sensitive binder. Although the investigation was ultimately inconclusive in positively establishing the presence of a photographic print and although the treatment that was carried out is not innovative, the process of attempting to characterize an object within the constraints of a private practice has value in itself and may add to the knowledge for further research into the this type of composite structure.

Speakers
avatar for Abbott Nixon

Abbott Nixon

Painting Conservation Assistant & Operations Manager, West Lake Conservators
Abbott received her B.A. in Arts Administration from SUNY Fredonia, where she studied the ephemeral performance art. She received her M.A. in Critical Museum Studies in May 2018, where she focused on the museum management and wrote her Master's thesis on the ethics of material de... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Luisa Casella

Luisa Casella

Photograph Conservator, West Lake Conservators
Luisa has a Masters in conservation from the Instituto Politénico de Tomar, in Portugal. She worked for eight years at Luis Pavão Limitada, serving museums, archives, and cultural institutions. In 2005 Luisa was awarded the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of the Advanced Residency... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
TBA

4:30pm

5:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Keeping it Vertical: Use of GIS to create a streamlined survey and work order system for a historic landscape
Keeping it Vertical: Use of GIS to create a streamlined survey and work order system for a historic landscape Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery is home to over 200,000 historic monuments and over 7,000 trees throughout its 478 acres. As Green-Wood’s landscape ages and evolves, the need for more technologically advanced collections management software became apparent, a need which resulted in the creation of a unique ArcGIS-based collection management system. In Collector for ArcGIS, management and field crews input survey information such as date, material, dimensions, and conditions of a historic monument or caliper, condition, and taxonomic information of a tree. Managers also create work orders in Collector, which thanks to a first-of-its-kind script which links the two, automates the creation of a work-order in WorkForce for ArcGIS. Work orders are assigned by the Manager, and analytics related to executed work orders and efficiency metrics are reviewed in an Operations Dashboard. The link between Collector and WorkForce allows staff members to geotag work orders to specific trees and monuments while tracking their progress and saving survey information along the way. By utilizing the power of GIS, our software analyzes our landscape’s varied assets simultaneously and streamlines the implementation of the work necessary to maintain those assets, thus offering an enhanced, multi-faceted portrait of Green-Wood. Software such as this could be used across other large historic cemeteries, large archeological sites, city and state park land, throughout museum environments, and scores of other cultural landscapes. This presentation will guide viewers through the inception of the software and its application in the field. Founded in 1838 and now a National Historic Landmark, Green-Wood was one of the first rural cemeteries in America. By the early 1860s, it had earned an international reputation for its magnificent beauty and became the prestigious place to be buried, attracting 500,000 visitors a year, second only to Niagara Falls as the nation’s greatest tourist attraction. Crowds flocked there to enjoy family outings, carriage rides, and sculpture viewing in the finest of first generation American landscapes. Green-Wood’s popularity helped inspire the creation of public parks, including New York City’s Central and Prospect Parks. Green-Wood is 478 spectacular acres of hills, valleys, glacial ponds and paths, throughout which exists one of the largest outdoor collections of 19th- and 20th-century statuary and mausoleums. Four seasons of beauty from century-and-a-half-old trees offer a peaceful oasis to visitors, as well as its 570,000 permanent residents, including Leonard Bernstein, Boss Tweed, Charles Ebbets, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Horace Greeley, Civil War generals, baseball legends, politicians, artists, entertainers and inventors.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Charap

Joseph Charap

Director of Horticulture, Green-Wood Cemetery
Joseph Charap is the Director of Horticulture and Curator at Green-Wood Cemetery, in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from the New York Botanical Garden's School of Professional Horticulture. He is a certified arborist and has a Masters in English Literature from Brooklyn College... Read More →
avatar for Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Manager of Restoration and Preservation, Green-Wood Cemetery
Neela K. Wickremesinghe joined the Green-Wood team during fall 2016. Ms. Wickremesinghe holds MS in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation.


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:00pm

(Book and Paper) Looking Back and Taking Stock – A Journey through Past Projects
Since this year’s AIC’s Annual Meeting theme has been expanded for the Book and Paper Group session to include re-evaluation of materials used in historical conservation treatments, the speaker would like to reflect back on more than 30 years of training and working in the conservation field and publically review some cases that provided great anxiety at the time or give pause upon reflection today. He will in fact review his own – by now – historic conservation treatments. The cases range from unintended immediate physical and chemical modifications, to unexpected long-term changes that have an impact on the use of collection items. The speaker will review a number of conservation treatments and evaluate how they have stood the test of time. He will also recount his experience as a conservation student, damaging a 16th century Albrecht Dürer print during a conservation approach that he has since then no longer used. He will discuss his experience with light bleaching a 19th century drawing by Joseph Keppler, an action that created unanticipated chemical changes in the paper. And he will delve into mechanical paper splitting and the unexpected long-term effects of this technique on 19th century US newspapers. The speaker ends with an observation made using Russell-effect photography and wonders whether the wide-spread use of the mat window as storage container should receive closer scrutiny in case in certain circumstances this type of housing unintentionally creates an environment that will give rise to a higher oxidation rate within the confines of the window.

Speakers
avatar for Elmer Eusman-[Fellow]

Elmer Eusman-[Fellow]

Chief, Conservation Division, Library of Congress
Elmer Eusman received his diploma in book and paper conservation in 1989 from the Dutch National School for Conservation, a four-year program now integrated with the University of Amsterdam. After completing his studies, he completed internships in a private conservation studio i... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:00pm

(Collection Care) Vibration testing and wandering of objects in a natural history collection
Studies on the effects of vibrations on the condition of objects of cultural heritage often focus on paintings or unique objects with particular historical value. However, vibrations are also of concern for large collections of objects which serve as (inter)national reference collections. One such collection is the Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, home to the fifth largest natural history collection in the world with over 37 million objects. The storage facilities are physically attached to the museum, offices and laboratories, which are undergoing major renovations. This collection cannot be moved elsewhere, so there are obvious concerns about the effect of vibrations due to heavy construction on the wide variety of objects in the collection. There is virtually no data in the literature on the effect of vibrations on natural history objects. Naturalis and RCE therefore conducted a limited set of vibration tests to obtain an initial impression of what could happen to representative objects under vibration loading. Of particular interest were object resonance, movement on the shelves (“wandering”), and the appearance of damage. The storage situation was simulated by placing objects on typical free-standing metal shelves used in the storage facilities, which were placed unfastened on a commercial vibration testing table. Objects included mounted fauna, small specimen boxes, wood and mineral samples, mounted insects, and bottled biological samples. In order to study the effect of vibrations on the objects alone, they were also tested directly on the vibration table. Testing was conducted at different vibration frequencies and levels. Members of the Naturalis collection care staff visually determined the resonant frequencies and wandering behavior of the objects. The results showed that object vibration behavior depends on a number of factors including their weight, geometry, and mounting, the vibration behavior of the shelves, and characteristics of the object/shelf contact surface. If objects were placed directly on the vibration table, they began to resonate visibly at their resonant frequencies above levels of around 5 mm/s, and began to wander at levels above 20 mm/s. No damage was found for the objects tested for short durations, except for a small loss of particles from a large historical tree branch, and from minerals which lay unpadded on the table. However, vibrations were amplified through the loose standing shelves, reaching levels up to 20 times that of the vibration table itself. This resulted in significant wandering of objects on the shelves, including small specimen boxes falling off of stacks of such boxes. These results indicate that the 2 mm/s low-risk limit suggested by Wei et al (2014) for collections for one construction project would be applicable as a low-risk limit for natural history objects. However, measures would are needed to prevent objects from wandering (see also Smyth et al 2016). Non-reactive padding would help, and would also prevent damage to objects in direct contact with hard shelving materials. Furthermore, monitoring would need to be performed directly on the shelves, as opposed to just on the floor near the shelves.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. W. (Bill) Wei

Dr. W. (Bill) Wei

Senior Conservation Scientist, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
Dr. Wei (1955) is a senior conservation scientist in the Research Department of the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE - Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed). He has a B.S.E. in mechanical engineering from Princeton University (1977) and a Ph.D. in materials scie... Read More →

Co-Authors
ED

Esther Dondorp

Collection Manager - Reptiles and Amphibians, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
Ms. Dondorp obtained her Master's of Science in Animal Biology at the University of Leiden in 2010. This included two internships in biology as part of a larger study on the relationship between birds and dinosaurs, where she focused on their common ancestor, the crocodile. The l... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:00pm

(Electronic Media) Time-based Media Art Conservation Education Program at NYU: Concept and Perspectives
In recognition of the emerging field of contemporary art, New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center will expand its course offerings by establishing a specialization explicitly for the conservation of TBM artworks—the first of its kind in this country. This innovative course of studies will require students to cross the disciplinary boundaries of computer science, material science, media technology, engineering, art history, and conservation. The Conservation Center prepares students for careers in technical study and conservation through a four-year graduate program leading to a dual degree – an MA in the History of Art and Archaeology and an MS in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. The program is committed to maintaining its traditional strengths in paper, books, paintings, and objects conservation, while adding TBM as a new specialization. During the curriculum planning phase from 2016-2017, the core competencies and skill sets for future TBM conservators were identified based on meetings with experts from European programs and potential employers and practitioners in the U.S. The learning objectives have been organized to fit into the most suitable teaching formats and built around the best possible time line for acquiring specific skills. As with other specialties within conservation, the core competencies of future TBM conservators are grounded in conservation ethics, conservation methodologies, and conservation science. The conceptual framework of modern and contemporary art conservation alongside modern and contemporary art history and media theory will provide the basis early in the student’s education. Building on that foundation, specifically designed courses will cover topics such as electrics / electronics, computer science / programming, audio / video technology, digital preservation, and photo-chemical processes to develop a solid knowledge of each TBM media category, such as film, slide, video, audio, software, performance, light, kinetic, or internet art. Furthermore, the equipment associated with each media, the signal processing and characteristics of different display and playback devices, needs to be understood in context to assess the visual and aural integrity of a TBM artwork. In addition to the technical competencies, communication skills and the ability to create a network of experts are equally important. To gain physical and intellectual ownership of an artwork, future TBM conservation students will learn and practice how to identify the work-defining properties of an artwork and to understand and document all components in context, which requires close communication with all stakeholders involved. Students will learn how to draw a preservation plan for a TBM collection, which will translate into the general skills needed to promote advocacy for TBM works in an institution, to build and grow a lab, and to establish workflows. This presentation will outline the major steps planned for the education of future TBM art conservators and how this program will augment the body of knowledge in response to the needs of a rapidly growing art conservation discipline. The inaugural class will be launched in the fall of 2018. The development of the TBM art conservation curriculum has been generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Frohnert

Christine Frohnert

Conservator of Modern Materials and Media, Bek & Frohnert LLC, Conservation of Contemporary Art
Christine Frohnert (Graduate degree 2003, Conservation of Modern Materials and Media, University of Arts, Berne, Switzerland) is partner of Bek & Frohnert LLC, Conservation of Contemporary Art, based in New York City since 2012. Previously, Ms. Frohnert served for twelve years as... Read More →
avatar for Hannelore Roemich

Hannelore Roemich

Professor of Conservation Science, NYU Institute of Fine Arts, Conservation Center
Dr. Hannelore Roemich (PhD in Chemistry 1987, University in Heidelberg, Germany; Diploma in Chemistry 1984, University Dortmund, Germany) is Professor of Conservation Science to the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (NYU) since January 2007. Dr. Roemich offers instructi... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:00pm

(Objects) Conditioning Basketry Elements with Water and Ethanol: An Investigation into the Effects of Standard Conservation Methods
Humidification or conditioning of baskets to effect realignment or re-shaping is a standard conservation treatment performed wherever these collections are held. We know that baskets are particularly prone to damage caused by the alternate swelling and shrinking of fibers due to fluctuations in relative humidity. At the same time, this sensitivity has long been used in the conservator’s favor. The chemical composition of cellulose, specifically its ability to form hydrogen bonds, allows for both water and polar solvents to plasticize dried plant tissue. While humidification (or conditioning when using solvents) has become a standard conservation procedure, its effects on material properties have remained only theoretically evaluated rather than through a material study. In fact, untested concerns have been raised over microbial growth, and also the potential for irreversible swelling of the basketry elements. As a result, polar solvents – for example ethanol – have been added to or become a preferred conditioning media instead water. The research for this thesis project, conducted at the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program, revolved around designing an experiment to track the extent of swelling and subsequent recovery of basketry samples treated with water and ethanol vapor. These samples represent two plant species, willow (Salix spp.) and spruce root (Picea spp.), one deciduous and the other coniferous, which occur with some frequency in the basketry traditions of the western United States and Canada. The extent of swelling before and after the conditioning process between all the samples was compared, using measurements taken with a Keyence digital microscope. Pure water, pure ethanol, and three mixtures of the two at different proportions, were each evaluated for consequent dimensional changes occurring before, during, and after conditioning to the same relative humidity as is typically used in conservation treatments. The results of this study not only corroborate information from fields as diverse as conservation, forestry science and material science, but also point towards clear trends which can inform the conservator’s decision-making in planning humidification/conditioning treatments of basketry. By performing a material study, we are able to provide clearer guidelines about the effects of different conditioning solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Hayley Monroe

Hayley Monroe

Master's Student, UCLA/Getty Program for the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Hayley Monroe is a third year student in the UCLA/Getty Master’s Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a BA in Classics. She gained field experience in the conservation of ceramics, metals, glass... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:00pm

(Paintings) Evolon: Its Use from a Scientific Research and Practical Conservation Treatment Perspective
In recent years, Evolon®CR, made of a highly absorbent polyester/ polyamide microfilament fabric, has started to be used by many conservators for the removal of varnish layers on paintings. Its potential for controlled solvent application and dramatic reduction of mechanical action is particularly appealing. Moreover, it is especially suited for large-scale paintings. Several case-studies about the use of Evolon®CR have been published, but up until now no scientific study into the behavior of Evolon®CR with solvents has been carried out. In this paper preliminary results of testing of Evolon®CR will be presented. Moreover, a novel procedure for varnish removal using Evolon will be shared and illustrated with case studies.
Evolon®CR is being characterized with the help of Py-GC/MS. The analysis of the components is necessary in order to understand how it holds up in solvents. It was found that specific solvents remove loose, extractable nano-/micro-fibers from the textile (polyamide (nylon-6) and polyester), but no monomers. From preliminary results it can be seen that a fully saturated 'tissue'  first releases  solvent into the painting after which it pulls it back up, together with the extractable components (free fatty acids). The rate and depth of diffusion is dependent on the solvent. This result was shown to be identical to varnish removal using cotton swabs, but involves no mechanical action as swabs do. Analytical results using less solvent (than saturation levels) will also be discussed.
Optimal saturation of the Evolon®CR with solvent is namely a very important aspect. After extensive testing, private conservators at the Restauratieatelier Amsterdam, developed a simple, but highly effective system of loading the Evolon®CR with specific amounts of solvent. This ensures that only the amount of solvent needed to swell and remove the varnishes is administered to the painting and that every part of the painting receives exactly the same amount of solvent. After timed trials with small strips of Evolon®CR using varying solvents and amounts thereof on various colour parts of a painting in order to determine the most effective solvent at the least concentration for the least amount of time, the varnish removal can proceed with larger sheets.
During treatment, the location of the sheets on a painting can be documented. After evaporation of the solvent, the sheets of Evolon®CR can be scanned at high resolution and stitched to form a mosaic of Evolon®CR corresponding to the painting. Remarkably, areas of thicker varnish, retouching and fine details, such as the crack pattern of the paint can be observed in the used sheets. In order to get a better understanding of these patterns on the Evolon®CR, used sheets were scanned with a macro-XRF scanner (Brüker M6 Jetstream). An insight was gained into the constituents of the retouchings, but more importantly, an image of the areas with varnish could also be made visible in the elemental maps. Further study of these results with other analytical techniques will be presented.
It can be concluded, that though further research is certainly necessary, this manner of using Evolon®CR  makes varnish removal more efficient, safer and more controlled in comparison with varnish removal with swabs. Moreover, the used sheets of Evolon®CR provide an invaluable record of the removed varnish and retouching for further research.

Speakers
avatar for Petria Noble

Petria Noble

Head of Paintings Conservation, Rijksmuseum
As Head of Paintings Conservation at the Rijksmuseum since 2014, Petria has expanded the department, laying more emphasis on research into the materials and techniques of artists' as well as those of conservation. Originally from Australia, Petria Noble carried out her post-gradu... Read More →
avatar for Gwen Tauber

Gwen Tauber

Senior Paintings Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Gwen Tauber has been a painting conservator in the Rijks Museum since 1990 and is primarily concerned with the treatment of paintings, their examination and treatment documentation. She works in the midst of an interdisciplinary team comprised of conservators, scientists and cura... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Robert Erdmann

Robert Erdmann

Senior Research Scientist, Rijksmuseum
With the latest techniques in the field of computer vision, machine learning, image processing, materials science and visualization theory Erdmann works to preserve, understand and make accessible visual artistic heritage. He is currently a Senior Scientist at the Rijksmuseum. Al... Read More →
avatar for Henk van Keulen

Henk van Keulen

Specialist Conservation and Restoration, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
avatar for Katrien Keune

Katrien Keune

Research Scientist, Rijksmuseum
Katrien Keune holds the position of paintings research scientist at the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, The Netherlands.  She received her degree in Chemistry at the University of Amsterdam in 2000 and got her PhD degree in Analytical Chemistry in 2005. Her PhD- work was part of the MOLA... Read More →
avatar for Kathrin Kirsch

Kathrin Kirsch

Conservator of paintings and modern artworks, Restauratieatelier Amsterdam
Kathrin completed her degree at the University of Applied Sciences in Cologne in 2000, specializing in the restoration of paintings and sculpture. During her 5-year program, she completed a six-month internship at SKRA in 1997 (Stichting Kollektief Restauratieatelier Amsterdam) i... Read More →
avatar for Andreas Siejek

Andreas Siejek

Painting Conservator, Restauratieatelier Amsterdam
Andreas Siejek is net als zijn collega Kathrin Kirsch afgestudeerd aan de University of Applied Sciences in Keulen als Diplom-restaurator voor schilderijen en geploychromeerde sculptuur. Andreas heeft jarenlange ervaring als zelfstandig restaurator. Hij werkte voor onder meer het... Read More →
avatar for Susan Smelt

Susan Smelt

Junior Paintings Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Susan Smelt is a junior paintings conservator at the Rijksmuseum. She graduated in 2012 from the University of Amsterdam with an MA and Professional Doctorate in Conservation and Restoration of Paintings. During the two-year postinitial phase she worked at the Stichting Restaurat... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

5:00pm

(Photographic Materials) How to Receive and Organize a Collection of 1 Million Photographs at Once? Material and Metadata Discussions
All over the world for decades, newspapers and journalist groups have formed huge collections of photographs and clippings. This presentation aims to analyze the strategies used and projected to describe the photographic collection of the Jornal do Commercio (Comercy newspaper). When this newspaper was closed in 2016 it has been the longest paper in activity in South America; in the same year, Instituto Moreira Salles, a cultural institute that stores documental collections, bought the collection of photographs that was gathered by this newspaper. Over 70 years the newspaper collected around 1 million photographs, 700,000 photos, and 300,000 negatives, most of them about Brazil. These pictures were stored in file folders that received a thematic title in order to organize the photos in series. Much information about the pictures was registered on the back part; it’s possible to identify information such as date, place, photographer, newspaper where it was published and sometimes the full article. In order to catalog this collection, from the hugest series to each photograph, it was necessary to identify ways to transcript all the available data. The 1 million photographs were kept in around 1900 boxes; each of them contained 2 to 120 cardboard files; in the top of these files there is a title that informs which kind of pictures are in the files. In the original organization the collection was divided in two huge series, subjects and personalities; those series were divided into thousands of smaller collections. The first tool used was a penscanner that can scan digitized texts and apply OCR, but this scanner wasn’t useful and precise in the old cardboard files, because there was no contrast. This pen only has good results in white paper. Then the team started to use a voice recognition software available in any Macintosh operational system. This software, used in Portuguese, reached high levels of precision and helped to make the process of description of the series very quickly. This software couldn’t be used in the personality series, because it only works in one kind of idiom, so the team is taking pictures of the cardboard files in order to apply OCR. The digital capture of useful informations for cataloguing and to describe this collection is a strategy to register the documents of the collection in a fast and accurate way. It’s also a conservation initiative, because it avoids information and documents disassociation. This set of actions have an important role to insert the cataloguing data in international standard like Dublin Core, Lido and ISAD(G). In addition discussions related to thesaurus, folksonomy and automatic indexing are equally relevant for this works and strategical group of actions. 

Speakers
avatar for Rodrigo Bozzetti

Rodrigo Bozzetti

Registrar / Historian, Instituto Moreira Salles
Graduated in Library Science in 2012, by the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro state. Master degree in Information Science in 2016 by the Brazilian Institute of Information in science and Technology, where I developed an epistemological study about the concept of document. Sin... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

6:30pm

Book and Paper Group Reception
The Morian Hall of Paleontology is your back drop as you enjoy excellent food and drink and the opportunity to mingle with your fellow book and paper conservators. Embark on a Prehistoric Safari in one of the nation's top paleontology exhibits.  

Sponsors
avatar for Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.

Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.

President, Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.
Hollinger Metal Edge was founded in 1945 in Arlington, Virginia. Working with officials at The Library of Congress and National Archives, Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc. developed acid free papers, storage boxes and envelopes that would allow for the proper preservation of valuable do... Read More →
avatar for Ploygon

Ploygon

Polygon
With five document facilities throughout the US and Canada, Polygon offers the most advanced techniques for document recovery and media restoration. Our complete offerings include paper, books, blueprints, X-rays, film restoration, copying, secured destruction and scanning servic... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Houston Natural Science Museum

6:30pm

6:30pm

Research and Technical Studies, Textile, and Wooden Artifacts Groups Reception
Join us at Project Row Houses in Houston's historic Third Ward for this joint and eclectic reception. Gather for food and drink in the historic Eldorado Ballroom. View local art exhibitions, tour the models of redesigned affordable housing that helps fosters community.

Sponsor a student ticket! Click here.

Sponsors
avatar for Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc.

Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc.

Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc.
Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc. has been serving the museum community for over 50 years. Originally specializing in creating life-size lifelike figures for museums, Dorfman has sculpted the likenesses of over 800 people and created over 5,000 realistic figures for museums, visitor c... Read More →
avatar for T and D US, LLC

T and D US, LLC

T&D Corporation manufactures a complete line of wireless and stand-alone Data Loggers offering a variety of web based data collection, remote monitoring and notification features.  Wireless data collection options include an innovative hand-held portable unit with graphical disp... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Project Row Houses
  • Cost $19-49

7:00pm

Paintings Reception
The stunning Menil collection will be the location for the paintings reception. The Twombly Gallery will be open for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy food and drink, while you reconnect and network with your peers.

Note: we are holding the ticketed Specialty Receptions on 5/31 and the All-Attendee reception (formerly know as the Opening Reception) on 6/1 due to the late hours of the MFAH.

Sponsor a student ticket! Click here.

Sponsors
avatar for Atlas Preservation Inc.

Atlas Preservation Inc.

Atlas Preservation was conceived based on the need for a one stop source for all monument restoration supplies. Our mission quickly expanded to include many other fields relating to conservation & historic preservation. such as products for metal conservation, historic window rep... Read More →
avatar for Kremer Pigments Inc.

Kremer Pigments Inc.

Kremer Pigments Inc.
KREMER PIGMENTS has been discovering and redeveloping historical pigments and mediums since 1977. Our professional assortment consists of over 100 different mineral pigments made from precious and semiprecious stones, which we offer in various grinds and qualities, over 70 natura... Read More →



Thursday May 31, 2018 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Menil Collection

7:00pm

Architecture and Objects Specialty Groups Joint Reception
Celebrate the historical architecture and objects that build Houston - gather on Connally Plaza in the heart of modern Houston surrounded by some of Houston's oldest buildings. We will have access to the museum and the interiors of some of the historic buildings. Enjoy food and drink from Pappasitos Catering - a Houston tradition. We are attempting to arrange a pre-reception viewing time as well. Note we are holding the ticketed Specialty Receptions on 5/31 and the All-Attendee reception( formerly know as the Opening Reception) on 6/1 due to the late hours of the MFAH.

Sponsors
avatar for Bruker Corporation

Bruker Corporation

Bruker is one of the world’s leading analytical instrumentation companies. We cover a broad spectrum of advanced solutions in all fields of research and development. Bruker’s innovative methods and non-destructive analytical techniques help to protect and preserve artifacts a... Read More →
avatar for GC Laser Systems

GC Laser Systems

GC Laser Systems
G.C. Laser Systems Inc. designs and builds unique laser systems specifically for art and architecture conservation.  Our compact and portable systems, such as the GC-1, offer unmatched precision and control over the level of cleaning.  We also offer custom built laser cleaning... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Heritage Society
 
Friday, June 1
 

7:30am

7:30am

7:30am

7:30am

(Textiles) TSG Business Meeting
Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
TBA

8:30am

(Architecture) The development of modern organic materials, 1845-1930
Up to the middle of the nineteenth century, the “liquid-to-solid” organic materials that serve as architectural paints, coatings and adhesives represented the chemistry of natural products. The sources of raw materials were varied, including drying oils, tree resins, and animal and fish glues, but commercial users wanted products with greater ease of use, and better (and more consistent) performance. The earliest of these improved materials involved relatively simple modification of natural products, with industrial-scale experimentation giving us vulcanized rubber and cellulose nitrate. Improvements in the production of coal and oil distillates, and in the structural study of organic molecules, led to the first generation of phenolic resins and butadiene rubber in the early twentieth century. By 1930, many familiar materials—such as alkyd resins, PVC and Nylon 66—were starting to enter the marketplace. They set the stage for a broader revolution in polymer science that dramatically changed the work of architects, engineers and builders in the decades that followed.

Speakers
avatar for Norman Weiss-[Fellow]

Norman Weiss-[Fellow]

Associate Professor, Columbia University
Norman R. Weiss is recognized for more than fifty years of scientific work with historic structures. He has taught at Columbia University since 1977. Prof. Weiss is a fellow of the Association for Preservation Technology, Vice President of MCC Materials, and Director of Scientifi... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Book and Paper) Small but bulky: a study on the rebinding of a portable 15th century book of hours
Book conservation treatment rarely calls for the full rebinding of a book. Where possible, conservators preserve the material nature of a book by keeping its original components and performing minimal intervention. At times, more interventive treatments are necessary to prepare the book for safe handling. HRC 10, a 15th-century Flemish book of hours from the Ransom Center’s Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Collection, presents a case-study where rebinding became essential, allowing an in-depth examination into combinations of different binding components suitable for small, bulky manuscript formats. Prior to treatment at the Ransom Center, HRC 10 was in a 19th-century stiff board, laced-in binding sewn on recessed cords. While the manuscript is small enough to fit into the palm of a user’s hands, its 226-folio text block makes the volume very thick. The opening of the volume’s parchment leaves was restricted by the binding and the text block’s heavily lined spine. To access the book’s contents, users had to exert pressure to open the text block, often with their fingers touching the fragile illuminations and writing that is close to the edges of the pages. As the manuscript is often studied for its illuminations, curators and conservators determined that treatment was necessary to increase the openability of the text block. Multiple conservators worked on HRC 10 over the course of its treatment, and the treatment plan changed greatly from its initial development to completion. When a decision to resew and rebind a text block is made, conservators usually attempt to create a new binding structure that is sympathetic to the period of the text block. For HRC 10, this would have meant resewing on raised supports. While this is a strong sewing structure, it is not optimal for small, bulky text blocks, where the sewing supports tend to restrict the movement of the spine. Resewing HRC 10 in such a structure were therefore not successful in increasing the openability of the volume. Several models with various sewing structures were made to determine the best structure for HRC 10, using different combinations of components such as sewing style, sewing support materials, lining materials and methods of attachment, and endbands. An unsupported link stitch, similar to the sewing used for earlier Byzantine and Coptic bindings, was finally selected. It greatly improved the openability. The binding was then covered in an alum-tawed skin, a conservationally-sound material. The treatment project of HRC 10 presented an opportunity to trace the thought-process of different conservators throughout the treatment of one manuscript, culminating in an in-depth examination of the structural complications of working with small, bulky text blocks to provide a satisfactory treatment solution.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Kwan

Kimberly Kwan

Bollinger Conservation Fellow, Harry Ransom Center
Kimberly Kwan is the Bollinger Conservation Fellow, Book Lab at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. She received her MA in Conservation at Camberwell College of Arts, London, UK with a specialization in books and archival materials. Prior to working at the Ran... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Electronic Media) Collaborations for Documenting Media Art: A WEB 3.0-Archive and Bridging Thesaurus for MediaArtHistories
While Media Art has evolved into a critical field at the intersection of art, science and technology, a significant loss threatens this art form due to the rapid technological obsolescence and static documentation strategies. Addressing these challenges, the Interactive Archive and Meta-Thesaurus for Media Art Research is developed to advance the Archive of Digital Art. www.digitalartarchive.at Through an innovative strategy of collaborative archiving, social Web 3.0 features foster the engagement of the international Media Art community, and a *bridging thesaurus* linking the extended documentation of the Archive with other databases of traditional art history facilitates interdisciplinary and trans-historical comparative analyses. Bringing artists, curators, historians, academics, institutions and conservators together - The Archive of Digital Art (ADA) gathers content-rich data on artists, events, institutions, literature, scholars and individuals works in a cross-referenced searchable online open-access archive. This paper will give an overview of ADA and its rational for engaging the community through WEB 3.0 strategies as well as details on the creation and implementation of its *bridging thesaurus.* Also included is an overview of similar initiatives (databases, archives, etc) and the need for global networked organization and support for Media Art research, as written in the Liverpool Declaration www.mediaarthistory.org/declaration. This declaration, signed by over 400 colleagues from around the globe, calls for addressing the situation of potentially losing an art form that is a central part of our post-industrial digital culture if systematic global preservation and documentation campaigns do not emerge. Written by scholars, cultural managers and artists of electronic art, the declaration states clear international needs for the future preservation and documentation of this art form. Discussion with the meeting attendees on how academics and archivists can directly address the future needs of conservators will be one of the goals in presenting this paper.

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Coones

Wendy Coones

Department for Image Science, Scientific Staff, Danube University Krems
Wendy Jo COONES directs the Exhibition Strategies Division at the Department for Image Science at the Danube University in Krems, Austria. She received a fine arts degree in New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute. After receiving an M.Ed. in Educational Research & Philosop... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Prof. Oliver Grau

Prof. Oliver Grau

Chair Professor in Image SCience, Center of Image Science at Danube University
Oliver Grau was appointed first Chair Professor for Image Science in the German speaking countries at the Center of Image Science at Danube University in 2005. More than 280 lectures and keynotes at conferences worldwide, including the Olympic Games culture program and the G-20 S... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) Facial Reconstruction of Ancient Egyptian Mummies: Experiences from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Poised at the intersection of science and art, the field of facial reconstruction offers an unprecedented way to approach the ancient dead as human beings who “look like us.” This paper discusses issues precipitated by the digital reconstruction of the faces of two ancient Egyptians stewarded by the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, and considers how new scientific technologies as well as ethical concerns complicate attempts to render human remains more recognizably human. The interdisciplinary nature of this project required developing a new framework for respectful practices for the preservation and presentation of human remains, particularly as there were many perspectives involved; in the case of this research, this included the combined expertise and insights of forensic artists and anthropologists, a facial prosthetist, radiologists, biomedical engineers, digital imaging specialists, Egyptologists, graduate and undergraduate students, as well as an art conservator. Focusing on two ancient Egyptian individuals who have been closely associated with the history of Baltimore, and Johns Hopkins University, its hospital and its Archaeological Museum since the early twentieth century, this paper highlights the many unexpected types of documentation that were required to more fully understand the “object biographies” of these two individuals. From their acquisitions to early autopsies, to past conservation treatments, recent computed tomography scanning and digital reconstruction as well as multi-band imaging of associated objects, the kinds of data, and expertise required to decode these new kinds of data, has raised questions about how we affect a more holistic stewardship of human remains. The paper will also consider how the final digital depictions were contextualized and interpreted for a broader audience through student documentation and student-designed public programming in order to invite the museum visitor and the public to have a role in ensuring a respectful stewardship of the people of the past.

Speakers
avatar for Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Associate Director/Conservator, Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Sanchita Balachandran is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She teaches courses related to the technical study and analysis of ancient objects, a... Read More →

Co-Authors
JG

Juan Garcia

Student, Ridgely Middle School
avatar for Mark Roughley

Mark Roughley

Research and Teaching Assistant, Liverpool John Moores University
Mark is a trained Medical Artist and his 3D modelling, CGI texturing and animation skills, alongside knowledge of CT data reconstruction practice, 3D scanning and 3D printing are used to aid in Craniofacial Reconstruction and for presentation to public audiences.
avatar for Kathryn Smith

Kathryn Smith

PhD researcher, Face Lab
Craniofacial identification and depiction (forensic and archaeological) | visual art and curatorship | Ethics of display
avatar for Meg Swaney

Meg Swaney

PhD Student, Egyptian Art & Archaeology, Johns Hopkins University
Meg Swaney is a PhD student in Egyptian Art & Archaeology and a Graduate Student Museum Supervisor at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. She she does osteological work at the JHU Mut Temple expedition, and her dissertation focuses on the art history of the temple of Ptolemy... Read More →
avatar for Caroline Wilkinson

Caroline Wilkinson

Director, Liverpool School of Art & Design
Craniofacial identification and forensic art

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Paintings) The Blues of Jan de Bray: the study of two blue pigments and its impact on treatment
This paper will present the examination, analysis, and treatment of a seventeenth-century oil on panel painting in the collection of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The painting depicts Judith and Holofernes and was painted in 1659 by Jan de Bray, a Haarlem-based history and portrait painter. The painting was brought to the conservation department for examination and treatment in the summer of 2016. Although initial stages of the treatment were straightforward, the removal of many layers of discolored natural resin varnish revealed an unusual and confusing pattern of damage in the blue area of the bedspread. Extensive abrasions, some round and ring-shaped, were visible with the naked eye, and the presence of microscopic islands of whitish material suggested that either pigment discoloration or undesirable pigment-binder interactions had occurred. To more fully understand the damage and alterations, the blue area was subjected to intensive study. Non-invasive analytical and imaging techniques, in addition to micro-sample analysis, were employed, including infrared reflectography (IRR), Hirox digital microphotography, micro Reflectance Transformation Imaging (micro-RTI), cross-sectional analysis, macro X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (MA-XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-BSE/EDS), Ultra High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Photo Diode Array (UHPLC-PDA), and portable micro-Raman spectroscopy (pRaman) and X-Ray Diffractometry (pXRD). Two different blue pigments were identified: indigo was used in the first blue layer of the bedspread with lapis lazuli glazed on top. The whitish islands were characterized as lapis lazuli that were apparently degraded in the past. The authors propose a possible mechanism for the degradation of the lapis lazuli based on SEM-EDS data showing reduced levels of sulfur in the degraded areas. These data are then correlated with observations of the painting’s condition as well as with another recent publication of a painting by Hieronymus Bosch (Genbrugge 2016). Another significant finding includes the presence of alum in the indigo, which may explain the light blue fluorescence of the dark blue indigo paint under UV illumination. Consultation of contemporary source material provides additional context for the use of ultramarine and indigo pigments in seventeenth-century Dutch paintings. Ultimately, a more complete understanding of the materials present in the blue area and the ways in which later alterations to these pigments have affected the overall appearance of the painting informed the inpainting stage of treatment. This treatment step is discussed in light of these findings.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Gerrit W. Albertson

Jon Gerrit W. Albertson

Annette de la Renta Fellow in Paintings Conservation, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fairchild Center for Paintings Conservation
Gerrit Albertson is currently the Annette de la Renta Fellow in Paintings Conservation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, working under the supervision of Michael Gallagher and Dorothy Mahon. A 2017 graduate from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Co... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Yoshinari Abe

Dr. Yoshinari Abe

Lector, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science
Dr. Yoshinari Abe is Lector of analytical and inorganic chemistry at Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science. He received a Ph. D. degree in chemistry from Tokyo University of Science in 2012 for studies in scientific investigation of blue colorants and pigme... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Art Proaño Gaibor

Dr. Art Proaño Gaibor

Materials Scientist - Specialist in Conservation and Restoration, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE)
Art Proaño Gaibor is a Specialist in Conservation and Restoration at the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands since 2017. He has a degree from the ROC chemistry school of Amsterdam since 2008. He is specialized in the analysis of organic colorants in textiles, synthetic c... Read More →
avatar for Anna Krekeler

Anna Krekeler

Paintings Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Anna Krekeler was trained as a paintings conservator at the University of Fine Arts in Dresden, Germany. Since her graduation in 2007, she has been working in the Rijksmuseum’s Painting Conservation Studio. Her main research interest is in the techniques and materials of artist... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Annelies van Loon

Dr. Annelies van Loon

Paintings Research Scientist, Rijksmuseum
Annelies van Loon is a paintings research scientist both at the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) and the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis (The Hague). She received a master’s degree in chemistry, a post-doctoral diploma in the conservation of easel paintings from the Limburg Conservati... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Photographic Materials) Artist's Materials, Reproduction and Authenticity of Fine Art Photography: Interviews with Artists on Reprinting their Faded Photographs
As a result of the intrinsic weaknesses in the image-forming dyes of color photographs, and due to insufficient preservation strategies in the past, color photographs in art collections from the 1970’s and 80’s have shifted in color and faded. Due to their fading, some artists with the aim to restore the photograph's 'original' color, decide to reprint photographs using modern materials. Once printed the modern image often replaces the 'original' photograph. As illustrated by this author during the ICOM-CC PMWG Interim Meeting held in September 2016, in Amsterdam, reprinting fine art color photographs brings with it a number of challenges and consequences. For example, in reprinting, the negative is digitized and the image is printed using techniques and papers not available at the time of the original printing. Often, the coloring in the photograph is restored, using digital software such as Adobe Photoshop, to what was thought to have been its original color. However, original colors were never recorded leaving these attempts at restoration merely a best guess. Regularly, the reproduced image differs from the ‘original’ in material and technique, cropping, format, finishing and/or framing and illustrates the creative working methods of the artist at a time of reprinting. Reprinting may disrupt the edition (the finite number of photographs printed of the same image by the artist) by increasing the number in the edition, or by introducing different aesthetic and material qualities within a once homogeneous set of prints. When an edition becomes disrupted or new materials are introduced, the authenticity and value of the new print, as well as the value of remaining works in the edition are challenged. This may result in what I have termed “material dissociation” or, loss of information surrounding period materials. This presentation focuses on the value of artist materials and the authenticity of the reprinted photograph. A number of Dutch artists that are currently reprinting parts of their earlier work were interviewed to establish the criteria used by the artist in his decision to reprint a photograph. The presentation discusses the process that the artist undergoes in deciding to reprint, and his criteria for reprinting and in some cases the decision making and criteria used by museums that hold the artist's work. It reflects upon the choice of artist material and the authenticity of the resulting modern work.

Speakers
avatar for Clara von Waldthausen

Clara von Waldthausen

Lecture in Photograph Conservation, University of Amsterdam Programme in Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage
Clara von Waldthausen received a MA in Photograph Conservation from the University of Amsterdam and has been in private practice since 2000. She has presented and published on a number of divers topics including the identification of coatings on 19th C paper photographs, treatmen... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) All that Glitters: Visualizing and Characterizing Gold Leaf through Macro-XRF Scanning
The application of gold leaf is ubiquitous in late medieval painting, but our knowledge of how it was applied is based largely on historical treatises and modern practice. Analytical techniques traditionally applied to the study of historic works of art, such as X-radiography and point-analysis x-ray fluorescence (XRF), identify only the presence and elemental composition of the metal leaf at a single point, respectively. MA-XRF scanning has opened up a new avenue of research into the study of gilding materials and techniques by providing unprecedented new insight into visualizing the dimensions of individual gold leaves, differences in how the leaf was applied by various artists and workshops, and the variability of gold leaf alloy compositions available. In addition to elucidating the original artistic creative process, MA-XRF can identify and map restoration interventions using gold leaf, thereby providing new documentation of historic conservation or restoration efforts. Statistical measurement of the dimensions of individual gold leaves provides a new tool for supporting or refuting links between separated components of altarpieces. This poster presents the results of studies from a number of paintings and manuscript illuminations that demonstrate the ability of MA-XRF to elucidate new information about the composition of metal leaf, its application, and its past conservation.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas MacLennan

Douglas MacLennan

Research Lab Associate, The Getty Conservation Institute
Douglas MacLennan works in the Technical Studies Research laboratory at the Getty Conservation Institute. His work focuses on the technical examination of works of art in collaboration with both conservators and curators. His research interests include the use of XRF and multispe... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nathan Daly

Nathan Daly

Postdoctoral Fellow, Getty Conservation Institute
avatar for Arlen Heginbotham

Arlen Heginbotham

Conservator, J. Paul Getty Museum
Arlen Heginbotham received his A.B. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and his M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College. He is currently Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Arlen’s research interests include the... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Lee

Lynn Lee

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Lynn Lee received her PhD in physical chemistry from the University of California Berkeley. Her current areas of research include the study of traditional—especially those used in antiquities—and modern artist materials and techniques using non- or minimally invasive analytic... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Schmidt Patterson

Catherine Schmidt Patterson

Associate Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Catherine Schmidt Patterson received her PhD in physical chemistry at Northwestern University. Her primary areas of research are the use of non- or minimally invasive techniques such as Raman microspectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, technical imaging to study works of... Read More →
avatar for Yvonne Szafran

Yvonne Szafran

Senior Conservator, J Paul Getty Museum
avatar for Karen Trentelman

Karen Trentelman

Senior Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Karen Trentelman is head of Technical Studies research, which focuses on the scientific study of works of art to further the understanding and preservation of these works in collaboration with conservators and curators. Current areas of interest include: revealing hidden layer... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Turner

Nancy Turner

Conservator, J. Paul Getty Museum

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Textiles) A Lot of Nitpicking; Documentation of Tom Welter’s painted silk battle flag encapsulation method and materials.
Reconsidering the history of conservation is not solely about how things have been treated. Instead, by examining the decision-making process, which forms and informs future conservation treatments, we can gain context to fully understand and assess previous work. Tom Welter began to develop a method to encapsulate fragile silk battle flags in 1964 after a 3 day tutorial with conservator Katherine Scott. While Welter was very talented as an artist and mechanic he had no prior experience in textile conservation. The encapsulation treatment he developed, while invasive by today’s standard, was performed on more than 200 painted silk battle flags throughout the country. Innovative in application Welter’s ultimate goal of treatment was not just to consolidate but to make the flags available for use. Within this paper, a detailed documentation of the procedure developed by Welter will be revealed. Materials such as surfactants and adhesives will be identified. All information documenting the treatment procedure will be based on; Welter’s personal journal entries, written treatment documentation, physical evidence, and an oral history provided by his daughter Nancy Cyr. It is hoped that by documenting Welter’s encapsulation method, conservators and curators will be better informed to preserve these fragile silk battle flags.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Frisina-[PA]

Ann Frisina-[PA]

Textile Conservator, Heartland Textile Preservation Services LLC
Ann Frisina began her career at the Textile Conservation Workshop in 1989 where she spent three years under the guidance of Senior Conservator, Karen Clark. While at T.C.W. her work focused on flat 2-dimensional textiles ranging in sizes from small samplers, to larger quilts. Mov... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
TBA

8:30am

(Collection Care) Materials Selection for Storage, Exhibit, & Transport: A Moderated Panel Discussion
It is an acknowledged truth in the field of preventive conservation that materials selected for storage, exhibit, and transport of collections play a critical role in the long-term preservation of these same collections. The wrong materials—those selected without careful consideration or those selected based on flawed assumptions (e.g. one batch of material varies in composition from another)—can impact the overall stability of collections, promote damage to collection items, or result in material failure. Selecting an appropriate material can be fraught with challenges: What are the specific properties necessary for the task? How can these properties be evaluated to relate to material performance and overall task compatibility? How can communication with industry result in a supply of consistent material? Nevertheless, collection care professionals must regularly select materials for purpose amid these challenges, which can leave the professional feeling like their best efforts still rely on guesswork, qualitative evaluation, and inconsistent results. 
To begin unraveling this complex issue and begin developing solutions, a working group (Materials for Collection Care Working Group) consisting of the various stakeholders engaged in material development, testing, and selection is underway. This group is currently engaged in identifying the current challenges with materials selection and evaluation and more clearly defining the stakeholders and their roles. From there, the group will develop a resource for advancing the community’s ability to take a more educated role in material development, selection, evaluation, and use. 
A moderated panel focused on improving awareness of materials, their components, and the testing required for their use in collection care will consist of: 
1. A Standards professional representing an organization that develops community-tested standards, such as ASTM. This person will address how standards are developed, resources needed for their development, and community expectations: Michael Skalka, National Gallery of Art and ASTM Chairman of DOI.57 Artist Materials
2. A Conservation Scientist to present the complexities of material testing: Eric Breitung, The Metropolitan Museum of Art 
3. A Conservator experienced in developing specifications for products: Andrew Robb, Library of Congress 
4. A Supplier discussing the challenges of working with manufacturers and consistency of materials: John Dunphy, University Products 
5. An Exhibit Designer discussing the challenges of working with collection care professionals and materials suppliers and manufacturers to develop in-budget exhibitions with a collection care priority: Tomomi Itakura, Fine Art Museums of San Francisco 
Through presentations and moderated discussions, continuing steps for the working group will be identified and prioritized. Each panelist will be given 10 minutes to speak, followed by 30 minutes for guided discussion and questions. 

Moderators
avatar for Pamela Hatchfield-[Fellow]

Pamela Hatchfield-[Fellow]

Head of Objects Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Pamela Hatchfield is the Robert P. and Carol T. Henderson Head of Objects Conservation at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She received her Master’s degree in Art History and Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, with an advanc... Read More →
avatar for Catharine Hawks-[PA]

Catharine Hawks-[PA]

Museum Conservator, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
Catharine Hawks is the museum conservator for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. She was in private practice for 20 years, working with over 100 institutional clients in the US and abroad. At NMNH, she coordinates conservation services throughout the museum... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Eric Breitung

Eric Breitung

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eric Breitung, Research Scientist, specializes in modern preservation materials and museum environment issues in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Scientific Research. His work includes the development of advanced analytical test methods for assessing commercial ma... Read More →
avatar for John Dunphy

John Dunphy

Vice President & General Manager, University Products
John Dunphy is the Vice President & General Manager of University Products based in Holyoke, MA. The company offers a complete line of archival quality enclosures including boxes, folders and polyester L-Velopes. They also offer an array of conservation tools and equipment as w... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Robb

Andrew Robb

Head, Special Format Conservation Section and Coordinator, Preservation Emergency Response Team, Library of Congress
Andrew Robb is Head of Special Format Conservation in the Conservation Division of the Library of Congress. He also serves as the Coordinator of the Library’s Preservation Emergency Response Team and is responsible for the procurement of preservation housing supplies used acros... Read More →
avatar for Michael Skalka

Michael Skalka

Conservation Administrator, National Gallery of Art
B.A., Art History, Rutgers University M.F.A. in Museum Studies, Syracuse University Conservation Administrator at the National Gallery of Art. 1984 to present. Responsible for overseeing daily financial administrative operations of the conservation division. Serves as the coordin... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:00am

(Architecture) Life after Lead Paint for Historic Houses
For centuries, lead based paints have been the primary paints used on external woodwork on historic houses. However, recent changes in legislation related to VOCs (volatile organic components) and the restriction of the use of lead paint due to toxicity has meant that paint formulations have changed to meet the changing legislation requirements. In addition, there has been a growing interest in the use of "environmentally friendly" paints. For historic houses, the cyclical maintenance requirements of repainting external woodwork is a major financial consideration and as result, the need to assess the performance of the wide variety of paints available encouraged the National Trust to undertake a series of paint trials to assess sustainability as well as consideration of the visual appearance of the paint (a factor which is important in maintaining the historic appearance of our properties). In 2006, the National Trust began a series of external paint trials on 13 garage doors on one of our properties to assess the performance of the selected paints. The trials provided information about the sustainability of the paints based on visual evidence of cracking, flaking, color change and moisture penetration. Whilst informative, it was realized that the results could not provide a recognized methodology for comparing the paints' performance. As a result, a group of heritage organizations led by the National Trust decided in 2011 to conduct a series of trials at the Paint Research Association in order to provide an industry recognized standard testing procedure to assess 34 paints which were selected on the basis of those used by the members of the group as well those which were commercially available to ensure that they would still be available after the conclusion of the trials. In addition, a number of "environmentally friendly" paints were included to assess their performance. The trials began in 2012 and after four years of testing, the results enabled the group to evaluate the performance of the paints and select 10 paints which performed above average as well as a linseed based paint, a lead based paint and a ICP (internal comparison product used as a standard) to be used to coat a number of the original panels to assess their performance. It was felt that this test would reflect more accurately the method of repainting used on historic properties where the underlying paint layer is simply sanded to remove defects and then coated with a new paint layer. It would also provide information about the sustainability of applying a different paint system over an existing paint layer. This paper explains the procedures involved and the results to date which should provide guidance for historic properties to ensure that the most sustainable paint systems are applied to external wood work.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Leback Sitwell

Christine Leback Sitwell

Paintings Conservation Adviser, National Trust
Christine Sitwell received a Master of Science in Art Conservation from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum in the United States. Subsequently she was awarded a Smithsonian fellowship for an internship in the conservation department at the Tate Gallery, London. In 1990 s... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Book and Paper) Branded by Fire: Treatment of los Primeros Libros
The Texas A&M University Libraries collections contains twenty examples of volumes designated as "primeros libros" and form the basis of international collaboration of nearly thirty institutions to build a digital humanities collections of these volumes available for research (http://www.primeroslibros.org). These Texas A&M University volumes are previously untreated at the libraries and several are in need of intense conservation treatment to bring them back as functional research tools. This presentation will review the unique characteristics of volumes of primeros libros selected for conservation, such as the marcas de fuegos (burned in brand) that is on several foredges of the books, and how those characteristics informed the treatment decisions while preserving the significance as unique artifacts.

Item Background: “Primeros libros” are books first printed in the Americas from approximately 1539 to 1605 in colonial Mexico and Peru. They are part of the Colonial Mexican Collection, which contains thousands of works either produced in Mexico or European imprints concerning Mexico during the Age of Exploration, Colonial, and early National periods and is a significant collecting area for the library as well as resource for the scholarly community in this area. The collection offers a significant number of examples of Mexican colonial bindings, woodcuts, illustrations, illuminated and decorated manuscripts, types, publishers, marginalia, and other information.

Speakers
avatar for Jeanne Goodman

Jeanne Goodman

Conservator, Texas A&M University Libraries
Jeanne Goodman is the Conservator for the University Libraries at Texas A&M University. She received her MLIS from Simmons College with a concentration in Preservation and her undergraduate work with University of Delaware in Collections Care. She completed the full-time Bookbind... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Electronic Media) Collaboration in the Aesthetic Zone: Trisha Brown and Robert Rauschenberg
Set and Reset is a masterpiece of American postmodern dance, establishing Trisha Brown's role as a seminal choreographer working within abstraction. The performance, a collaborative project between Trisha Brown (choreography), Laurie Anderson (music), and Robert Rauschenberg (set and costumes), made its U.S. debut in 1983 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York. To assure the longevity of Set and Reset, preserving the set’s film elements has become a collaborative effort between two of the artists’ estates, demonstrating a new preservation strategy for the exchange of information, histories, funding, storage, and clarification of rights. Since it's inception, the Trisha Brown Dance Company has frequently toured Set and Reset domestically and internationally, including a major performance this past spring 2017 as part of the Rauschenberg’s exhibition at Tate Modern, London. Prior to London, the performance continually used Rauschenberg’s original set, which Rauschenberg entitled Elastic Carrier (Shiner) despite the entire performance being named Set and Reset. The set consisted of a freestanding multi-pyramid structure on which montaged archival footage from 6 reels of films is projected, and the film elements were deteriorating from years of continued use. Recognizing this, TBDC applied without success for several grants to preserve the films. The project was "set and reset" a few times until fall 2016 when TBDC joined with the Rauschenberg Foundation and work proceeded with BB Optics and independent media conservator, Shu-Wen Lin. The result of this project debuted at the performance in London. Throughout the preservation project, we endeavored to track and document the reasoning behind the unavoidable changes between the 1983 and 2017 presentations. Given the collaborative nature, we carefully address the following issues - who is responsible to preserve a moving image work that is part of a performance? Is Elastic Carrier (Shiner) an independent work, or may it only exist as an element of the dance? What is the implications of migrating a moving image work in performance from film to digital projection? This panel aims to share the continuing conversation among estates and foundations, and to shed light on issues and principles surrounding the preservation of moving images in performative artworks.

Speakers
avatar for Bill Brand

Bill Brand

President, BB Optics
Bill Brand is an artist, educator and film preservationist. Through his company BB Optics, Inc. he has preserved hundreds of small gauge films and films by artists since 1976. His own experimental and documentary films, videos and installations have exhibited extensively worldwid... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Shu-Wen Lin

Shu-Wen Lin

Research Fellow for Digital Preservation, National Library of Medicine
Shu-Wen Lin serves as Associate Conservator, Time-Based Media at M+ Museum for Visual Culture, and as Research Fellow for Digital Preservation at National Library of Medicine in 2017. She received her MA from the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program at New York Univers... Read More →
avatar for Cori Olinghouse

Cori Olinghouse

Archive Director, Trisha Brown Dance Company
Cori Olinghouse is an interdisciplinary artist, archivist, and curator. Since 2009, she has served as Archive Director for the Trisha Brown Dance Company, a company she danced for from 2002-2006. Olinghouse is currently developing a series of artist archivist projects that explor... Read More →
avatar for Francine Snyder

Francine Snyder

Director of Archives and Scholarship, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation
Francine Snyder is the Director of Archives and Scholarship at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. Prior to the Rauschenberg Foundation, Ms. Snyder spent nearly a decade as Director of the Library and Archives at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and, before that, she was a Projec... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) Gold Working at Ur: A Collaborative Project to Better Understand Ancient Gold Smithing
This paper presents recent research on gold artifacts from the Royal Cemetery of Ur, ca. 2450-2100 BCE and proposes some possible methods for their manufacture. Sir Leonard Woolley excavated these artifacts at the site of Tell al-Muqayyar (ancient Ur) in southern Iraq in the 1920s-1930’s as part of a project sponsored by the Penn Museum and the British Museum. Iraq’s 1924 Antiquities Law provided for a division of finds, and half the material went to the Iraq Museum, with a quarter going to the Penn Museum and a quarter going to the British Museum. The initial data were collected as part of the Ur Digitization Project, a joint initiative between the Penn Museum and the British Museum to digitize objects and records at both institutions. The collaborative nature of the Ur digitization project fostered interdisciplinary research at the Penn Museum. These relationships have continued beyond the Ur Digitization Project and so too has the examination of the gold from Ur. Initial analysis of the gold from Ur focused on objects from Private Grave (PG) 1422. It has since expanded to include a diverse selection of gold items from the Royal Cemeteries as new research has been conducted in preparation for the re-installation of the Middle East galleries at the Museum. This paper will focus on three distinct object types, gold vessels, gold jewelry, and gold fillets. All the data presented here were captured non-invasively using digital X-radiography and digital photomicrographs. While X-radiography and microscopy are not new techniques for the examination of archaeological objects, new developments in digital processing allows for better data collection that can highlight features previously difficult to capture. The present study combines the knowledge of conservators, archaeometallurgists, and archaeologists to better understand how the gold vessels and adornments from the royal cemeteries may have been manufactured. This interdisciplinary study places the objects within their archaeological context as well as highlights which aspects of their manufacture are significant.

Speakers
avatar for Tessa de Alarcon-[PA]

Tessa de Alarcon-[PA]

Project Conservator, Penn Museum
Tessa de Alarcon has been employed as a Project Conservator at the Penn Museum since 2012. She has worked on two condition assessment projects, the Ur Digitization Project and the Digital Kourion project and she is currently working on preparing objects for the re-installation of... Read More →

Co-Authors
MJ

Moritz Jansen

Teaching Specialist for Archaeometallurgy for the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials, Penn Museum
Moritz Jansen has been the Teaching Specialist for Archaeometallurgy at the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials at the Penn Museum since October 2015. Before he came to the Penn Museum he was employed as a Research Fellow in the Department for Archaeometallurg... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Richard Zettler

Dr. Richard Zettler

Associate Curator-in-Charge of Penn Museum’s Near East Section, Penn Museum
Richard L. Zettler is an archaeologist specializing in Mesopotamia, the region occupied by modern Iraq and Syria. He received his MA and PhD (1984) in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago. He worked at Nippur, early Mesopotamia’s religious cen... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Paintings) Gabriel Revel’s "Portrait of a Sculptor": a painting and treatment in transition.
The examination and treatment of Old Master works inevitably involves the interpretation and conceptual deconstruction of a complex overlay of visual evidence of the artist’s studio practice, natural aging of materials, past structural treatments, cleanings, restorations, and even associated damage. In the case of a portrait by the French baroque academic painter Gabriel Revel, these tasks were complicated by the dramatic revelation of compositional features in part obscured by the painter himself in pentimento. In particular, the rendering of a small statuette that had been covered by past restoration raised questions about the correct reading of the piece. As part of the creative evolution of the portrait, Revel modified the left forearm and hand position to make room for the inclusion of a classical statuary fragment of a head. Yet the positioning of the fingers is ambiguous and the painter’s intentions are unclear as to whether the portrait was meant to contain both of the sculptural fragments or just one. Digital X-radiography imaging of the substrate paint layers conducted at Oregon Health and Sciences University was hampered by an aluminum sheet concealed within the wax resin lining dating to the 1960s. Mammography, with a higher resolution for assessing subtle differences between densities in materials, also provided limited results regarding the original composition. Imaging was helpful, but failed to present a clear answer to questions that remained regarding the reconciliation of the various compositional features of the subject’s left hand and his possessions. Reversal of the lining and removal of the aluminum sheet were considered to improve imaging clarity, but eliminated as options due to the sustained structural stability of the lining materials. Ultimately, a bold curatorial decision was made to temporarily reveal all compositional elements of the painting. Although the composition has greater clarity and visual strength without the statuette, suggesting a reason why it was previously masked, the restoration choice was acknowledged as potentially a transitional state. It is hoped that bringing attention to the work will inspire research of Gabriel Revel, an artist with scarce dedicated scholarship, and therefore provide greater clarity regarding the artist’s intentions. The paper will discuss conservation of the portrait as a sum of multiple historic identities, and the decision making process that guided the treatment choices in the formal interpretation, perhaps ephemeral, of "Portrait of a Sculptor".

Speakers
avatar for Nina Olsson

Nina Olsson

Principal and owner, Nina Olsson Art Conservation, LLC
Nina Olsson is a researcher and conservator of paintings in private practice established in Portland, Oregon in 2001. Since 2015, Nina is also president and co-founder of Heritage Conservation Group, LLC, a consortium of Portland-based conservators of diverse specialties. Nina ha... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Photographic Materials) Revealing History with Moisture and Megabytes: Curled Panorama Prints from WWI and WWII
This case study presents an ongoing project in collaboration with a military history museum and their archives for the conservation and digital preservation of 150 - 200 silver gelatin panorama prints from World War I (1917 -1918) and World War II (1940 - 1944). This project began in 2011 and work continues as funds are available. Along the way, other work has been requested and some replica digital prints have been made for the Adjutant General's office, the HQ offices, and VIP Officers' temporary housing.

Using example prints of the project, I will explain and illustrate the steps taken from the receipt and documentation of the original photographs, through the humidifying and flattening of the prints, to the repair and/or lining for stabilization. The next steps for the digital reformatting and any digital repair to the photographs will explain the level of capture and files that were requested by the museum's archivist. Finally, the reprinting of the photographs as digital prints in oversized formats will be adiscussed. To date, approximately 30 individual images that were in the original collection have been conserved.

Over the past six years, there have been new donations to the museum and donors have requested copies of the donated prints.  The museum has agreed, using some of their funds for this purpose. There have been approximately 7-9 unaccessioned prints that were requested to be reformatted instead of the original group.  One of the most interesting of the new prints is believed to be a photograph of the first Airborne Company formed in the U.S. Army.  

Sizes of prints ranged from 3"x 12", to 10"x 38", to 8"x 48", and the reformatted digital image files run into the gigabyte sizes. The prints are on neutral tone B&W papers, warm tone B&W papers, sepia and brown toned B&W papers. Some are semi-matte, though most are matte finished papers and all have a baryta coating. A few have the soldier's handwriting on them, showing where the "saloon", mess hall, "my tent", and various companies of a brigade. This presentation will show not only the details of the original materials used in these prints and steps used to conserve them, but will also allow us to put into perspective of the human element that was, and is, a part of war and the preparations. It reveals some of the naïveté that men and societies had when soldiers reported to training for combat during those eras.

Speakers
avatar for Kim R. Du Boise-[PA]

Kim R. Du Boise-[PA]

President; Senior Photograph Conservator, PhotoArts Imaging Professionals, LLC
Kim R. Du Boise has over 40 years’ experience with art, photography, and photographic materials as a photographer, university/college instructor, printmaker & conservator. Kim developed the art department at Pearl River Community College in 1987-1994 and a BFA curriculum in Ph... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) A contribution toward the identification of wood by heart-cut pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry.
This paper presents a novel method for conducting wood identification based on chemical analysis using heart-cut pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HC-Py-GC/MS) to analyze volatile fractions and thermal decomposition products from finely divided wood samples. This method has several advantages over traditional anatomical identification including a significantly reduced sample size (0.3 mg of powder vs. more than 40 mg for traditional thin anatomical sections), and increased ease of sampling. The method also shows promise for successfully discriminating between species that are not separable by anatomical methods. The use of an established analytical technique that is widely found in conservation science laboratories should make this method readily accessible to many researchers in the cultural heritage sector. The use of user-friendly and commercially available software for the evaluation of the GC/MS data also makes it possible to develop a reference database that can be easily shared and referenced by collaborating researchers. Evolved gas analysis (EGA) was used to establish an optimized furnace temperature that minimizes the production of compounds from the pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose while maximizing the contribution of non-cellulosic components such as lignin and extractives, which are more likely to be characteristic of specific species. The use of a selective sampler system further reduces cellulosic contributions to the chromatograms by diverting evolved gases away from the GC column after 30 seconds of sample residence in the pyrolyzer. Results were interpreted through comparison with reference standards utilizing F-Search from Frontier Laboratories, which is software commonly used for the identification of polymeric materials and additives in plastics. The software produces a weighted average of the mass spectra of all integrated components in a chromatogram (an INT-SUM spectrum), which can be matched against an established library of standards. Comparison of the chromatograms and statistical evaluation of the INT-SUM spectra by F-Search provided accurate results and eliminated the need for specific compound identification, thus rapidly increasing the speed of data interpretation. F-Search also allows for the exclusion of peaks, which is a feature used to eliminate problematic peaks produced by contaminants such as glues, varnishes or waxes. For this preliminary study, reference samples of 62 wood species commonly found in decorative arts collections were analyzed with the optimized HC-Py-GC/MS method. The resulting chromatograms and INT-SUM spectra were compiled in a reference library. The method was validated by analyzing samples taken from 17th – 19th century objects within the J. Paul Getty Museum collection and comparing the results to identifications made through traditional anatomical study. All of the samples were correctly identified through the combined use of the F-search ranking system and visual comparison of the chromatograms.

Speakers
avatar for Arlen Heginbotham

Arlen Heginbotham

Conservator, J. Paul Getty Museum
Arlen Heginbotham received his A.B. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and his M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College. He is currently Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Arlen’s research interests include the... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Jessica Chasen

Jessica Chasen

Graduate Intern, J. Paul Getty Museum
Jessica Chasen is the graduate intern in Decorative Arts and Sculpture Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Jessica earned an M.S. in Art Conservation from Winterthur / University of Delaware with a specialization in objects conservation and a minor in painted surfaces. Prio... Read More →
avatar for Madeline Corona

Madeline Corona

Objects Conservation Fellow, Harvard Art Museums
Madeline graduated with her M.S. from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation where she specialized in objects conservation with a concentration in conservation science. She earned her undergraduate degree in Chemistry and Art History from Trinity Univer... Read More →
avatar for Michael Schilling

Michael Schilling

Senior Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Michael Schilling is a senior scientist engaged in materials characterization research at the Getty Conservation Institute, where he has worked since 1983. He holds BS and MS degrees in chemistry from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. His research interests include... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:00am

(Textiles) The Mortlake Horses: A Collaborative Approach to the Conservation of Seventeenth-Century British Tapestries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
In preparation for the fall 2019 re-opening of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s renovated British Galleries, Associate Conservator Olha Yarema-Wynar and Assistant Conservator Alexandra Barlow completed the long-term conservation treatment of the seventeenth-century tapestry The Destruction of the Children of Niobe (#36.149.1) from the English Mortlake workshop. This tapestry is one of two within The Met’s collection from The Horses, a set which depicts riding horses found in Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
The Destruction of the Children of Niobe, measuring approximately twelve feet by twenty feet, is impressive in size and image. Past restoration efforts of this large artwork are visible throughout the piece, and within this one tapestry exists numerous examples of the techniques used in the history of tapestry preservation. The most recent treatment was informed by an understanding of these historic techniques and the skill and experience of the conservators.  Stimulating conversations with curators at The Metropolitan Museum of Art also influenced the treatment by helping to determine the aesthetic vision for the tapestry. These discussions presented a challenge on how to accommodate the vision of the curators with the conservators’ decisions about stabilization needs and the tenets of current conservation philosophy.
For both conservators and curators, historic repairs are a valuable document of prior methods. They provide an understanding of changes in technical skill, the effects of restorations, and the shifting viewpoints on the value of tapestries. The conservators working on this project were able to survey in detail these previous techniques. This presentation discusses both the methods that have proved stable, as well as those that have caused additional conservation issues over time. While many of the historic insertions are strong and discrete, earlier use of darning and mending stitches have caused distortions to the surrounding areas. It was only after careful dialogue and discussion on the stability of the textile that these previous repairs were documented, removed, and updated. Time was also a consideration throughout the entire treatment.
The 2016-2017 treatment involved both conservation and restoration stitching, as well as a combination of both handwoven fabric used for reproduction gallon borders and commercially available fabric for stabilization and the lining.
As a case study, this presents the examination of one object and how its materials and techniques provide critical annotation to the history of the preservation of tapestries.  

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Barlow

Alexandra Barlow

Assistant Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Alexandra Barlow, Assistant Conservator, is currently working with Olha Yarema-Wynar on the treatment of three large tapestries in preparation for the renovation of the British Galleries. She received her MA in Fashion and Textile Studies with a focus on Conservation from the Fas... Read More →
avatar for Olha Yarema Wynar

Olha Yarema Wynar

Associate Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Olha Yarema-Wynar, Associate Conservator, is responsible for the conservation of textiles from the Department of Arms and Armor and the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Art's tapestries collection. She holds an MFA in decorative and applied arts from the Lviv Natio... Read More →



Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:30am

(Architecture) Can’t Touch This! The Treatment of Original Distemper Painted Plaster Walls
In May of 2016, members of the Department of Conservation and Technical Research at the Walters Art Museum began to investigate the original plaster walls in the library of 1 West Mount Vernon Place, which is now a part of the museum complex. This impressive family home was designed by architects Niernsee and Neilson and was completed by1851. After a series of other owners and uses, the building was given to the museum by the City of Baltimore in 1984. It subsequently underwent significant renovations and opened to the public in 1991 as a gallery of Asian Art. In 2016, after 25 years of use, upgrades to the HVAC system and the installation of a fire suppression system led to the temporary closure of the building and allowed for gallery refurbishments. When the conservation department was asked to remove fabric paneling from the library so that it could be replaced, they were surprised to find that the original painted ornamental plaster that had not been viewed since 1991 was largely intact. This raised and decoratively painted ornamental plaster was first covered with fabric in the 1890s when the house underwent significant alterations. At that time, many of the high points of the plaster had been chiseled off to allow the fabric panels to span the walls without distortion. In addition, later upgrades, including the installation of gas and electric lines for wall sconces and an air duct were made without regard to the plaster walls. Despite these interventions, the original color scheme and decorative painting were intact, especially in the protected upper areas of the walls. One interesting feature of the design was the use of faux wood graining on the raised plaster elements. The faux wood graining integrated the painted plaster with the surrounding woodwork. Early hand-colored photographs of the room also show that there was an elaborate ornamental plaster ceiling that was later covered with a wooden beam ceiling. Despite numerous alterations to the room, the conservation staff advocated for the preservation and display of this rare survival of an original architectural painted finish. Given the size of the project, the conservation department contracted additional help to complete the conservation and restoration of the library walls. Once the project started, the extreme sensitivity of the distemper painted finish to water and polar solvents posed significant challenges in the selection of treatment materials and methods. The application of any sort of mold making material to the friable and readily stained painted surface was impossible, meaning that a “touch-less” method was needed to re-create large missing raised plaster elements. A partnership with the 3-D scanning and printing program at Harford Community College provided some creative solutions for this project. Silicone solvents aided in removing some large spackle repairs from the walls by providing a safe way to remove a water-soluble material from a water-soluble surface. The material challenges of this project led to creative solutions that can hopefully be adapted for future use in architecture and other specialties.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Marie Hulman-[PA]

Stephanie Marie Hulman-[PA]

Conservator, Decorative Arts Conservation LLC
Stephanie Hulman is a professional conservator of decorative and historic finishes, and she has been working in the field of heritage preservation since 2005. She earned her Master of Science in Art Conservation degree from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Con... Read More →
TP

Tia Polidori

Conservation Technician, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Tia is a conservation technician working on a two-year IMLS grant at Winterthur recoating silver objects in the Winterthur collection.


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Book and Paper) The unintended effects of some book treatments on original or early binding structures and materials
The treatment of bound materials in special collections has become more conservative over the past half century. Today, book conservators choose treatments that safeguard physical information intrinsic to early bindings. The treatments focus on mending and stabilizing book structures, which lessen the need for invasive treatments such as rebinding or rebacking covers. However, in repairing rather than replacing older structures and materials, the book conservator is often challenged by the binding's deteriorated condition, which can range from slight to considerable. At the Ransom Center, we have found that the repair of one binding structure can stress and, in some cases, break adjacent deteriorated binding components. This presentation will discuss problems that typical repairs can cause such as a new break in the sewing structure or stiffness in the spine, which changes how a book opens and how the pages turn. Techniques used by Ransom Center conservators to minimize stress to older components in order to preserve early structures and materials will be described using case studies.

Speakers
avatar for Olivia Primanis

Olivia Primanis

Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center
Olivia Primanis is the Senior Book Conservator at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, where she performs conservation treatments and manages the book lab and special projects. She is interested in general conservation and preservation subjects relating to library and mu... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Electronic Media) Lighting Round - Emulating Horizons (2008) by Geert Mul: the challenges of intensive graphics rendering
Similar to a conservator going into the details of a certain paint or plastic used in an artwork, I will concentrate on the graphics pipeline of Horizons (2008), a software-based artwork by Dutch media artist Geert Mul. The graphics pipeline is a chain of software and hardware tools a computer needs to render graphics. It can be very specific for video games or software-based artworks that make use of intensive, real-time graphics rendering and it has an impact on the preservation strategy. This research is based on the publications (Falcao et al. 2014)1 and (Rechert et al. 2016)2. Computer rendered graphics are quite common in software-based art. Artists may use video game software to produce video games for their simulations or interactive animations as for instance for Sow Farm (2009) by John Gerrard or Olympia (2016) by David Claerbout. Other artists and their collaborators produce the software themselves as for instance Geert Mul and his programmer Carlo Prelz did for Horizons (2008). Horizons (2008) has a classical setup for a computer-based artwork: it receives user input from a sensor, the computer generates a video by combining image sources and the sensor input and outputs the video on video projectors. Thus, it should be possible to generalize the findings of this research for artworks with a corresponding setup. While preparing for his retrospective, Geert Mul realised, that many of his artworks did not function anymore and needed updating or transfer to newer hardware. Consequently, he initiated a project with LIMA, a platform for research and archiving of media artworks in Amsterdam, in order to make his artworks “future proof” 3. Horizons (2008) did not have an immediate problem. However, when evaluating its long-term preservation options, it turned out that its graphics rendering was video card dependent. The model of the video card was hard-coded into the software, which means that changing the video card makes the work dysfunctional. As emulators of personal computers usually do not emulate specific video cards, I also feared, that Horizons could not be emulated. The hard-coding of the video card could be remedied by adapting the reference from the old to the new video card. However, it would still not make the work suitable for emulation. Furthermore, it appeared that certain intermediary software libraries are necessary in order to make the work independent from the hardware and therefore enable software rendering or virtualization. By analysing the graphics pipeline, it is thus possible to assess with a high probability whether the work can be emulated or virtualized. Other factors that might impede an emulation such as peripheral equipment are not discussed here. Yet, I will show, what has to be considered when “building” such an emulation or virtualization for graphics intensive artworks. 1 Falcao, Patricia; Ashe, Alistair; Jones, Brian (2014): Virtualisation as a Tool for the Conservation of Software-Based Artworks. Tate. London. 2 Rechert, Klaus; Ensom, Tom; Falcao, Patricia (2016): Introduction to an emulation-based preservation strategy for software-based artworks. Pericles / Tate. 3 http://www.li-ma.nl/site/news/future-proof-transformation-digital-art-2017

Speakers
avatar for Claudia Roeck

Claudia Roeck

PhD candidate, University of Amsterdam
My interest lies in the preservation of time-based media art. The ongoing and fast technological change and the processual character of many contemporary artworks open a fascinating field of work. I started my professional career as an environmental engineer with focus on waste m... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Electronic Media) Lighting Round - Preserving Stephan von Huene’s electronic artworks by means of bit-stream documentation
The ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, Germany is well-known for its media art collection. Recently the ZKM inherited two artworks by German-Californian artist Stephan von Huene, which have been undergoing a comprehensive acquisition process by means of audio, video and bit-stream documentation during a one and a half year fellowship. Von Huene’s computer-based sound installation "What’s wrong with Art?" (1997) shall be core theme and case study of the given talk. Stephan von Huene is a particular case, when it comes to systematic documentation of his electronic artworks by the artist himself. The artists estate, a meticulous archive of photographic and technical documents, is demonstrating this systematic way of working, and thus is a outstanding source for researchers. "What’s wrong with Art?" (1997) consists of three computer controlled organ towers in the colors red, yellow and blue, a complex electronic circuit, custom-made computer hardware as well as executable and compiled files written by the artist. Assessing the risks, future access and preservation it became apparent that the computer, with its individual plug-in cards and compiled code once failing could not be reactivated, reproduced or emulated and would therefore be lost. To cope with this issue, the electronics technicians, information scientists and conservators of ZKM worked closely together to tackle the risk of loss by designing an individual “Logic Analyzer”, recording and documenting the output and bit-stream of the computer and conducting comprehensive documentation of the logic system.

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Bunz

Sophie Bunz

Assistant Conservator, ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe
Sophie Bunz completed a Masters program in Conservation-Restoration of Modern Materials and Media at Bern University of the Arts, Switzerland. After her studies she held a fellowship at the ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, Germany. Subsequently she works as an assistant... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) The Tell-Tales Conservation of Two 2,000 Year Old Leather Water-Skins
In the early sixties, archaeologist Yigael Yadin excavated the "Cave of Letters", located near the Dead Sea in the Judean Desert, Israel. The cave probably served as a hideout during the second Jewish revolt against the Romans in 132 CE. Among many rare finds were several vegetable tanned leather water-skins, two of them in nearly complete form. While water-skins were originally created to contain liquids, the content of one of these excavated water-skins was different. It included: unspun wool skeins, jewelry, clothing, small glass vessels, wooden cosmetics utensils, and spindle whorls, indicating a secondary use of the water-skin as a satchel. The most historically significant items in the water-skin were a packet of letters written by Shimon Bar Kokhba himself, the leader of the rebellion, to his subordinates in hiding - hence the name “Cave of Letters”. The dry, stable conditions in the cave resulted in the leather’s fine state of preservation. Details such as historical repairs, in the form of sewn patches, could clearly be recognized in several places on the water-skin, and its opening end was still tied with an original rope. The water-skins, which are under the jurisdiction of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), are part of the archaeological collection of the Israel Museum (IMJ) in Jerusalem and are on display. Prior to their arrival at the IMJ, the water-skins were treated, probably in the mid 1960’s. Although no treatment records exist, black and white photographs from the excavation revealed that this initial treatment included cleaning, reshaping and inserting an inner support of a thick, cream colored fabric stuffed with hay. Nylon filament was used to hold down leather pieces which were folded over. In 1998, the IMJ’s Metal and Organic Materials Conservation Department was asked to assess the condition of the two treated water-skins. The evaluation concluded that while the leather was in exceptional state for its age, the 1960’s materials used in the treatment were not of conservation grade, and the aesthetics of the objects were not pleasing. It was therefore decided that one of the water-skins would be retreated. In 2017, fifty years after its initial treatment, and twenty years after the retreatment of its “twin”, the second water-skin was retreated. Over the span of 55 years, three different teams of well-meaning professionals tended to these invaluable treasures. Each team, with their knowledge and available materials, used these to their best abilities. This presentation aims to reveal, compare, and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment within the perspective of time.

Speakers
avatar for Irit Lev Beyth

Irit Lev Beyth

Head of Metals and Organic Objects Conservation, The Israel Museum
Irit Lev Beyth graduated in 1994 from Queen's University with a Master's of Art in Conservation. She interned at The Brooklyn Museum of Art and has been an objects conservator at The Israel Museum since 1998. In 2015 she was appointed Head of Metals and Organic Materials Conserva... Read More →
avatar for Hadas Seri

Hadas Seri

Object Conservator, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
Hadas Seri is an object conservator at the Metals and Organic Materials Conservation, the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. She graduated in 2010 from the Master of Art Conservation program at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada. Ms. Seri holds a second MA in Art History and a B.S... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Liatte Dotan

Liatte Dotan

Pre-Program Intern, The Israel Museum
Liatte is a pre-program intern in object conservation at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. In 2016 she obtained her B.A from the Honors Art History Program at Tel Aviv University. Liatte intends to continue her studies with a degree in art conservation in the coming years.
avatar for Jessica Lewinsky

Jessica Lewinsky

Object Conservator, Israel Museum
Jessica Lewinsky is an objects conservator at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. She specializes in collections care and preventive conservation. In 2014 she obtained her B.A.Sc. in Art and Heritage Conservation from ECRO, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; and in 2017 her M.A. in Theory a... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Paintings) Old World, New World: Painting Practices in the Reformed 1686 Painter’s Guild of Mexico City
In 1911, Emily Johnston de Forest, daughter of the founding president of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, John Taylor Johnston, donated her vast collection of tin-glazed earthenware to encourage the creation of a permanent display showcasing the artistic grandeur of colonial Mexican art. Despite her efforts, de Forest’s vision was not realized until 2013, when the Museum appointed a curator of Colonial Latin American Art. Since then, the Museum has organized exhibitions and acquired artworks from New Spain. For more than three hundred years this Spanish kingdom encompassed modern-day Central America up to the western half of the United States, as well as the Philippines. The Museum’s newly focused interest in the artistic output of this territory prompted the technical examination of two paintings, one by Cristóbal de Villalpando (ca. 1649-1714) and the other by José Sánchez (active 1686-95). From 1686 to 1688, these artists worked closely in the Painter’s Guild of Mexico City, scrutinizing the works of many young aspiring artists. In this capacity, they were responsible for shaping Mexican artistic practices well into the 18th century.

Cristóbal de Villalpando, the most productive painter of the New Spanish Baroque, developed an individual aesthetic that distinguished him from his contemporaries. The technical study of his Adoration of the Magi (1683) was carried out for a monographic exhibition on the artist that took place at the Metropolitan from July 25 to October 15, 2017. Unpublished and unknown to scholars, The Adoration has been in the collection of Fordham University since the mid-19th century, and has only recently been included into the artist’s oeuvre. The Marriage of the Virgin (ca. 1690) by José Sánchez was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum in 2016. It is one scene from a series depicting the life of the Virgin Mary, a subject frequently explored by painters in Spanish America. The paintings were created within a span of ten years, during which these artists served two years together as Guild examiners.

The results of our findings will be discussed in both regional and international contexts and will reveal the close connections and differences between preparation practices in Spain and its transatlantic territories. Of particular interest is the identification of ash in the ground layers of both paintings. This type of preparation is described by Francisco Pacheco in his 1649 treatise and has been identified in paintings of artists practicing in Madrid. This study presents material evidence that Mexican artists were following Madrilenian traditions, which had most likely been passed down through the Spanish painters that arrived in New Spain from the motherland.

This study comes at a propitious time. Art historical attention to New Spain has increased in the last decades but technical studies that contextualize the unique qualities of these important paintings are limited. Focusing attention on the individual contributions of New Spanish artists is essential to increase awareness of their artistic production, and create a body of knowledge about their material practices. 

Authors in Publication Order: José Luis Lazarte Luna, Dorothy Mahon, Silvia Centeno, Federico Caró, Louisa Smieska

Speakers
avatar for José Luis Lazarte Luna

José Luis Lazarte Luna

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow, Department of Paintings Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Department of Paintings Conservation
José Luis Lazarte Luna obtained a Master of Science degree from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation with a specialization in paintings. He is completing his second year as a fellow in the Department of Paintings Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Federico Carò

Federico Carò

Associate Research Scientist, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Scientific Research
Federico Carò received his PhD in Earth Science from the University of Pavia, Italy, where he worked on the characterization of natural and artificial building materials for conservation purposes. Since joining the staff of The Metropolitan Museum of Art he has investigated ino... Read More →
avatar for Silvia Centeno

Silvia Centeno

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art/ Department of Scientific Research
Silvia A. Centeno is a Research Scientist in the Department of Scientific Research at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she collaborates with scientists, conservators, and curators in studying and preserving works of art, and also pursues research in treatment methodologies a... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Mahon-[PA]

Dorothy Mahon-[PA]

Conservator, Department of Paintings Conservation, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Dorothy Mahon received her MA in the history of art and a certificate of advanced study in conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. She was appointed to the staff in 1981 and has conserved paintings spanning the collection, with emphasis on the technic... Read More →
avatar for Louisa Smieska

Louisa Smieska

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Fellow, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Scientific Research
Louisa Smieska received her PhD in Materials Chemistry from Cornell University in 2015 and then pursued postdoctoral research at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), where she developed expertise in scanning X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the corresponding data... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Photographic Materials) From Here On and Beyond: Researching Objects, History and Collection at The Museum of Modern Art
The Museum of Modern Art's 4-year Thomas Walther Collection project culminated in December 2014 with a symposium, Object: Photo print publication, website and exhibition.  This material-based study of the Walter Collection is symptomatic of a larger institutional interest in materials characterization that is not confined to a single collection, medium or even institution, but part of an ongoing effort to promote materials-based scholarship at large. Three years hence, assimilation of conservation material content continues at MoMA as well as in related arts fields, as can be seen in curatorial, technical art history and academic initiatives focused on material culture.
In 2005 with the Plane Image: A Brice Marden Retrospective, 2006 with Dada in the Collection, and on a yearly basis since, the department of conservation at MoMA has published formative work on individual artists, or artistic movements, in conjunction with curatorial initiatives.  Subjects include work of Pablo Picasso, Bill Brandt, Henri Matisse, Bruce Conner, Francis Picabia and Frank Lloyd Wright, among many others. In 2012, there was a considerable uptick in these studies which now include online publications.  Raisonné-style format to artistic studies is increasingly seen as a model. 
This presentation will outline the development of MoMA’s conservation scholarship, consider how this trend is reflected in and parallel to, sister institution's programming, posit views on the causes of this trend and review resources for these critical investigations.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Ann Daffner-[PA]

Lee Ann Daffner-[PA]

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Conservator of Photographs, The Museum of Modern Art
Lee Ann Daffner is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Conservator of Photographs at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City since 1998 and is responsible for all aspects of the preservation, conservation and materials research for photographs in all the Museum’s collections... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
TBA

9:30am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) Interdisciplinary and Multi-Technique Study of Previous Conservation, Bending Media, and Pigments of a Painted Polychrome Coffin from the Late Period
This paper describes the scientific investigations of an Ancient Egyptian painted wooden coffin, dating back to late period (664-332 BC). The polychrome coffin was previously restored, and previous plaster fills obscured original surface. The focus of this study is to use a multi-analytical approach to map and identify the pigments used on a polychrome wooden coffin , as well as to provide a deeper understanding of the painting techniques, the condition of the object, identification of wood species, identification of insects founded inside coffin, previous conservation materials, ground layer and painted layer included in this study. Several analytical and observation methods were employed in the identification processes such as the Light optical microscopy (OM), X-ray fluorescence portable (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Moreover, the application of technical photography provided useful information about the spatial distribution of the surviving original pigments, in particular visible-induced luminescence, which played an important role to recognize spatial distribution of areas containing Egyptian blue, even if it is in traces or mixed with other pigments, the authors were significantly interested in mapping technical photography (TP) including IR false color with XRF results as a non destructive methods to identify coffin pigments. Red pigment identified as Cinnabar, and recorded as a rare pigment found in late period collections. Key words: painted wooden coffin; Multispectral imaging; XRF; wood identification; Cinnabar