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Tuesday, May 29
 

8:15am

Hands-On Lithography for Conservators
Limited Capacity full

Lithography is a complex, chemical printmaking process that requires firsthand experience to fully grasp the technique and potential artistic applications. This workshop introduces conservators to various lithographic processes and techniques commonly utilized by artists and studios, historically and up to this day. The curriculum consists primarily of hands-on printing activities but will also include lectures and group discussions. A comprehensive resource binder will be assembled by the participants throughout the workshop from a combination of lecture slides, notes, printing materials (plates and prints), and other useful references. This will allow participants to walk away with a strong understanding of the technique and have invaluable resources at their fingertips when returning to work.

Transportation will be provided from the Marriot Marquis Houston each morning and back to the Marriot Marquis Houston following the workshop each evening. The bus will depart from the Marriot at 8:15am.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Taylor

Christina Taylor

Assistant Paper Conservator, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies/Harvard Art Museums
Christina Taylor is the Assistant Paper Conservator at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies/Harvard Art Museums. She is a graduate of SUNY Buffalo State where she earned her MA in Art Conservation in 2015. She has held positions at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston... Read More →

Instructors
CW

Christopher Wallace

Artist/Lithographer/Educator
Christopher Wallace is an artist, lithographer and educator based in Cambridge, MA. He received his MFA in printmaking from the University of North Texas in 2013, and his BFA in printmaking from the Kansas City Art Institute in 2010. He has held teaching positions at the University... Read More →



Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:15am - Wednesday May 30, 2018 4:30pm
Burning Bones Press 1518 Yale Street, Houston, TX 77008

8:15am

Varnishing in the 21st Century
Limited Capacity full

The introduction of new synthetic low molecular weight (LMW) resins by René de la Rie in the early 1990's, subsequent developments in the field, and discontinued solvents and resins have led to changes in the varnishes available to conservators. Through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and practical sessions, this workshop is designed for paintings conservators seeking to bring their knowledge of varnishes up to date.

Participants will gain knowledge in the characteristics of available, stable resins and solvents and how to evaluate their properties. A conservator's choices will affect the appearance and aging properties of cultural materials in their care. A short reading list will be sent in advance.

Transportation will be provided from the Marriot Marquis Houston each morning and back to the Marriot Marquis Houston following the workshop each evening. The bus will depart from the Marriot at 8:15am.

Instructors
avatar for Jill Whitten-[PA]

Jill Whitten-[PA]

Co-Director/Painting Conservator, Whitten & Proctor Fine Art Conservation
Jill Whitten received a BFA in Painting from the University of Texas at Austin, and an MA and Certificate of Conservation from Buffalo State College, New York, in 1992. Her work in the field of art conservation includes a collaboration with the National Gallery of Art and the J.Paul... Read More →
avatar for Robert Proctor-[PA]

Robert Proctor-[PA]

Co-Director, Whitten & Proctor Fine Art Conservation
Robert G. Proctor Jr. is a painting conservator in Houston, Texas. He has worked on numerous public murals and has developed a variety of structural techniques for minimal intervention. He teaches about varnishes and thread-by-thread tear re-weaving at U.S. conservation programs and... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:15am - Wednesday May 30, 2018 5:30pm
Menil Collection 1533 Sul Ross St, Houston, TX 77006

8:30am

Oddy Testing: Protocols and Practicalities
Limited Capacity full

In the 45 years since the first publication of the Oddy test by Andrew Oddy of the British Museum there has been a proliferation of methods used to perform this accelerated ageing test. A recent survey of institutions performing the test and a review of testing protocols on AIC’s wiki platform reveal over 20 distinct protocols. The variability of testing procedures as well as subjectivity of the results are well known issues in the field. Nevertheless, the test remains the prevalent method for evaluating exhibit, storage and packing material due to its low-cost, and easy implementation. The instructors will share their research examining the implications of various testing procedures and participants will have the chance to discuss methodologies with the goal of building consensus around a common protocol. Participants will gain hands-on experience in setting up the test properly as well as learn best practices for documenting and analyzing results. Types of additional analysis (e.g. gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), ion chromatography (IC), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy) that can aid in more fully understanding the test’s results will be discussed. This workshop is appropriate for those who are currently conducting tests for their institution, as well as those who would like to begin, either in a museum or private practice. Tips on how to record results in a format for easy upload to the AIC Wiki or CAMEO will be given. Participants who have results to share will have the opportunity to add their data on site with the assistance of AIC wiki editors. It is suggested that participants bring a laptop if possible.

Moderators
avatar for Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Partner, A.M. Art Conservation
Rachael Perkins Arenstein is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation and a Partner in A.M. Art Conservation, LLC the private practice that she co-founded in 2009. For more on A.M. Art Conservation please visit www.amartconservation.com. She has worked... Read More →

Instructors
avatar for Colleen Snyder-[PA]

Colleen Snyder-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects, The Cleveland Museum of Art
Colleen Snyder is currently Associate Conservator of Objects at The Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA), where she has worked for over 7 years. Colleen began in the middle of the museum’s extensive renovation project, which was completed in 2013, and has participated in the treatment... Read More →
avatar for Elena Torok

Elena Torok

Assistant Objects Conservator, Dallas Museum of Art
Elena Torok is the Assistant Objects Conservator at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA), where she works on the treatment, research, and long-term care of the collection. She earned her M.S. from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation in 2013 with concentrations... Read More →
avatar for Eric Breitung

Eric Breitung

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eric Breitung, Research Scientist, specializes in modern preservation materials and museum environment issues in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Scientific Research. His work includes the development of advanced analytical test methods for assessing commercial materials... Read More →
avatar for Michele Derrick-[Fellow]

Michele Derrick-[Fellow]

Schorr Family Associate Research Scientist, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Michele R. Derrick is a chemist and conservation scientist with more than twenty years’ experience analyzing and characterizing materials. She worked at the University of Arizona Analytical Center and then for twelve years as a conservation scientist at the Getty Conservation... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Owens

Samantha Owens

Conservation Fellow, Glenstone
Samantha is currently the Conservation Fellow at Glenstone Museum in Maryland. She holds an M.S. in Art Conservation from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation (WUDPAC) with a specialization in objects conservation and a B.A. in Art History from Emory University... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Springer-[PA]

Samantha Springer-[PA]

Conservator, Portland Art Museum
Samantha Springer relocated to Portland, Oregon in 2015 to take the position of Conservator at the Portland Art Museum. While Samantha remains a generalist due to her responsibility for care of a broad collection, she has particular interest in preventive conservation, sustainability... Read More →



Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
Montrose Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Pre-session Symposium) The Current Use of Leather in Book Conservation
Limited Capacity seats available

Leather has long been used as a repair material for damaged leather bindings. The working properties of historic leathers can be very different than modern ones. In recent years, conservators have begun to employ other materials, such as paper or cast acrylic, as an alternative to leather in book conservation treatments. Tanned animal skins offer less long-term stability and may be more difficult to prepare than other materials, but may also provide better strength and flexibility in a functioning book. Should conservators continue to employ leather using traditional book repair techniques on leather bindings? Should we abandon the use of tanned skins in favor of more chemically stable materials? Do alternative book repair materials really stand up to the mechanical stresses of use? Be part of the debate and register for the symposium.

Here is a brief sampling of the talks:

  • A virtual tour of J Hewit & Sons – discover how bookbinding leathers are produced.
  • An exploration of over 50 years of book conservation at the Boston Athenæum. 
  • A comparison of the use of customized acrylic cast into reusable silicone molds as an alternative to traditional methods
  • An examination of SINTEVA Cuir as an alternative to leather
  • A study of the applications of Japanese papers as a leather replacement
  • An evaluation of the characteristics of bindings suitable for repair using tanned leather and a summary of the training needed to execute these repairs and an exploration of the suitability of cosmetic treatments that may alter the appearance of a historic binding.
  • A panel discussion of the Library of Congress’s treatment protocols and case studies of when traditional leather or other materials were used.
  • A report on the leather discussion group’s study on why modern leather deteriorates faster than older leather 
Download a complete listing of talks with abstracts below. Lunch is included.

Moderators
avatar for Henry Hebert-[PA]

Henry Hebert-[PA]

Conservator for Special Collections, Duke University Libraries
Henry Hébert is a Conservator for Special Collections at Duke University Libraries. He holds Master's degree in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a diploma in hand bookbinding from the North Bennet Street School.
avatar for Marieka Kaye-[PA]

Marieka Kaye-[PA]

Head, Conservation & Book Repair, University of Michigan Library
Marieka currently holds the position of Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation Head, Conservation & Book Repair at the University of Michigan Library. She has worked at U-M since 2013, after serving as a book and paper conservator for 8 years at the Huntington Library in San... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for James Reid Cunningham-[PA]

James Reid Cunningham-[PA]

Director, Bookbinding and Conservation
James Reid-Cunningham is a book and paper conservator in private practice. He spent thirty years as a conservator at Harvard University and the Boston Athenaeum, and served as the President of the Guild of Book Workers from 2006 to 2010. From 2009 to 2013, he was the adjunct lecturer... Read More →
avatar for Emilie Demers

Emilie Demers

MAC Candidate in Paper, Photographs and New Media stream, Queen's University, Art Conservation Program
Emilie Demers is a recent graduate student from the Master of Art Conservation (MAC) program at Queen’s University, with specialization in paper objects, photographic materials and new media. Her undergraduate degree was completed at the University of Ottawa majoring in History... Read More →
avatar for Ségolène Girard

Ségolène Girard

Conservator, Bibliothèque de Versailles
avatar for Holly Herro-[PA]

Holly Herro-[PA]

Book and Manuscript Conservator, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine
Holly Herro is the Senior Conservator at the National Library of Medicine on the National Institutes of Health campus in Maryland. She has been involved in conservation as a book and manuscripts conservator for over twenty-five years and was apprenticed to Tom Albro, retired Head... Read More →
avatar for Katherine Kelly-[PA]

Katherine Kelly-[PA]

Senior Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Katherine Kelly is a Senior Book Conservator at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Previously, she has worked at the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, the National Archives, Iowa State University, Harvard University, and Cornell University. She received her MS in Information... Read More →
avatar for David Lanning

David Lanning

Supplier/Service Provider, J Hewit & Sons Ltd
avatar for Laura McNulty

Laura McNulty

Conservation Intern , Pre-Program Student, National Library of Medicine
Laura McNulty is currently a conservation intern at the National Library of Medicine on the National Institutes of Health campus in Maryland. In addition, she has worked at the American Philosophical Society, Library of Congress, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Colonial Williamsburg... Read More →
avatar for William Minter-[PA]

William Minter-[PA]

Senior Book Conservator, Pennsylvania State University Library
avatar for Dan Paterson

Dan Paterson

Senior Conservator, Book Conservation Section, Library of Congress
avatar for Sarah Reidell-[Fellow]

Sarah Reidell-[Fellow]

Margy E. Meyerson Head of Conservation, University of Pennsylvania
Sarah is the Margy E. Meyerson Head of Conservation at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. A Fellow of AIC, she is the AIC Publications Committee Chair and has served in various elected and volunteer positions... Read More →
avatar for Shelly Smith-[PA]

Shelly Smith-[PA]

Head, Book Conservation Section, Library of Congress
avatar for Katie C. Wagner-[PA]

Katie C. Wagner-[PA]

Book Conservator, Smithsonian Libraries
Katie Wagner is a rare book conservator for the Smithsonian Libraries. She works primarily with the two special collections libraries: The Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library and The Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology as well as with the other branches of the Smithsonian... Read More →
avatar for Dawn Walus-[PA]

Dawn Walus-[PA]

Chief Conservator, Boston Athenaeum
Dawn Walus is the associate conservator at the Boston Athenæum. Previously, she worked as a book conservator at the Weissman Preservation Center, Harvard Library and has held conservation internships and positions at The Preservation Society of Newport County in Newport, RI; The... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Wright

Kristi Wright

Book & Paper Conservator, Wright Conservation & Framing
Kristi Wright, principal of Wright Conservation & Framing, is apprentice-trained and has been active in the book and paper conservation field for over a decade. She has a Masters in Library and Information Science as well as a Certificate of graduate study with a focus on preservation... Read More →



Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Introduction to Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)
Limited Capacity full

Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), a computational photography technique, is a portable, low-cost imaging method used to create high-quality digital representations of an object’s surface. Using a basic digital photography setup, images are captured and then interactively re-lit and enhanced through open source software. Invented by Hewlett-Packard Labs and further developed by the nonprofit corporation Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI), RTI has been applied by conservators to document and analyze tool marks and other evidence of manufacture and use; to clarify and record inscriptions; to accurately record surface condition; and to qualitatively assess surface change
over time.

Attendees will complete the course with all the fundamental materials needed to conduct highlight-based RTI in their studios with their own photography equipment, including written guides to both capture and processing, software and one set of 1" reflective spheres.

This course is intended for individuals with at least a general understanding of digital photography and digital image processing; they are not required to have previous experience with RTI, but are encouraged to review examples and background through the CHI website prior to attending.

Members of AIC's Conservators in Private Practice Group can register at the discounted price of $210.

Speakers
avatar for Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Objects Conservator, The Found Object Art Conservation
Kerith Koss Schrager is an Objects Conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation. She has worked with institutions such as Historic Hudson Valley, Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Freer|Sackler Galleries (Smithsonian Institution), Field Museum, and Shelburne... Read More →

Instructors
avatar for Anna Serotta

Anna Serotta

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sponsors

Tuesday May 29, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tanglewood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Fiber Identification and Analysis
Limited Capacity filling up

This workshop covers basic polarized light microscopy (PLM) and methods of sampling, characterization and identification mammalian hair and selected natural and synthetic fibers. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises involving sample preparation and specimen manipulation as well as the characterization and identification of real life specimens.

Instructors
avatar for Nicholas Petraco

Nicholas Petraco

Nicholas Petraco Sr., BS Analytical Chemistry, MS Forensic Science, very extensive post-degree university coursework in art, art history and heritage conservation, Fellow of New York Microscopical Society (NYMS), Fellow of American Academy of Forensic Science, Diplomat of the American... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training
The National Park Service’s National Center for Preservation Technology andTraining protects America’s historic legacy by equipping professionals in thefield of historic preservation with progressive technology-based research andtraining. Since its founding in 1994, NCPTT has... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 9:00am - Wednesday May 30, 2018 5:00pm
Memorial Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

Department Head Luncheon and Tips Session
Limited Capacity full

A moderated discussion followed by lunch for the heads of conservation and conservation science departments. Participants will be asked to share effective ways they have demonstrated leadership in fundraising, creating staff positions and increasing diversity in the field. This session will be followed by the Communicating Values and Effecting Change workshop, during which additional participants interested in advancing conservation leadership (but are not currently department heads) will join the discussion. Participants of this luncheon are expected to register for the Communicating Values and Effecting Change workshop as well.

Moderators
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also established... Read More →
avatar for Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna was recently the Chief of Conservation at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a position she held since in 2011. Previously, Tiarna worked for nine years as a paintings conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. She holds a bachelor’s degree in both chemistry... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Associate Director/Conservator, Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Sanchita Balachandran is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She teaches courses related to the technical study and analysis of ancient objects, as... Read More →
avatar for Jeanne Marie Teutonico

Jeanne Marie Teutonico

Associate Director, Programs, Getty Conservation Institute
Jeanne Marie Teutonico is associate director of Programs at the GCI where her responsibilities include managing the Buildings and Sites, Collections, and Science departments, oversight of GCI publications, and the establishment of strategic priorities for the Institute's programmatic... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 11:00am - 1:00pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

1:00pm

Museum of Fine Arts Houston Collections Storage Tour
Limited Capacity filling up

Join us for a special tour of the MFAH collection storage.

Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
MFAH 1001 Bissonnet St, Houston, TX 77005

1:00pm

Persistence and Change: Leadership Techniques for Both
Limited Capacity filling up

Imagine that you were able to identify individuals who were open to change, and those that were more likely to dig in their heels to protect the status quo.  Perhaps even more importantly, what difference would it make if you could, through situation framing, communication and incentives, shift people from the latter category to the former?  This session aims to give participants that capacity.  The foundation of the session is in recent research from the Motivational Science Center at Columbia (and elsewhere) that identifies individual dispositions to persistence and change, and the interventions that can increase either tendency.  Approaches to change within museums will be reviewed using a case study and participants will leave the workshop with a better understanding of themselves and their organization. Discussions on motivation and mechanisms of organizational cultural will provide participants with a new set of tools to move people.

This workshop will be led by Professor Paul Ingram, from the Columbia Business School. In addition to his deep knowledge of the museum community, Dr. Ingram led last year’s workshop Advancing Leadership at the AIC Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Moderators
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also established... Read More →
avatar for Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna Doherty-[PA]

Tiarna was recently the Chief of Conservation at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a position she held since in 2011. Previously, Tiarna worked for nine years as a paintings conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. She holds a bachelor’s degree in both chemistry... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Paul Ingram

Paul Ingram

Kravis Professor of Business, Columbia Business School
Paul Ingram is the Kravis Professor Business at the Columbia Business School, and Faculty Director of the Columbia Senior Executive Program. His PhD is from Cornell University and he was on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University before coming to Columbia. He has held visiting professorships... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

1:00pm

University of Houston Public Art Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Join Michael Guidry, Curator of University Public Art Collection, and conservator Robert Alden Marshall for a tour of the University of Houston's public art collection. Learn about the special challenges faces public art in Houston's climate.  UH was the first Texas state institution to establish a percent for art program and currently has one of the largest and most impressive university art collections in the country, which includes more than 400 works of art. The collection contains works by local, regional, national, and international artists, across all forms of media and style. With many projects in the works, the University of Houston’s Public Art Collection will remain one of the strongest in the country for years to come. Cost $49

Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:00pm - 6:00pm
University of Houston

2:30pm

Bayou Bend Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Bayou Bend is the MFAH house museum for American decorative arts and paintings. Displayed in the former home of Houston civic leader and philanthropist Ima Hogg (1882–1975), the collection is one of the finest showcases of American furnishings, silver, ceramics, and paintings in the world. The house is situated on 14 acres of organically maintained gardens in Houston’s historic River Oaks neighborhood. On this special conservation focused tour, you will not only delight in an amazing decorative arts collection but see from an insiders point of view the special conservation challenges associated with the property. Cost $39

Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens
6003 Memorial Drive
Houston, TX 77007 

Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:30pm - 5:30pm
Tour Departure Point - Outside of Texas T Café Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

Downtown Deco and Downtown East Walking Tour
Limited Capacity seats available

Take some time to see Houston before the main sessions start with a Preservation Houston walking tour. Discover Downtown Houston’s historic Art Deco core. In the 1920s and 1930s, Houston was quickly transforming from a regional center into a city of national importance. As the city grew, many builders and architects embraced the modernistic style — bold, modern and elegant — as the ideal embodiment of Houston's new spirit. This tour includes the modernistic downtown buildings that are still standing (some beautifully restored, others forgotten gems) as well as lost architecture, which we explore using descriptions and historic photos. Circumstances permitting, the tour ends with a visit to the former Gulf Building (now the JPMorgan Chase & Co. Building), a 1929 masterpiece with some of the city's most magnificent Deco interiors. Learn how much the city of Houston is changing. This tour traces the history of the area through architecture old and new, ranging from historic structures such as Union Station and the 1915 Texas Company Building to new developments like Discovery Green, which has been a catalyst for nearly $2 billion in new construction. Cost $29

Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Tour Departure Point - Outside of Texas T Café Marriott Marquis Houston

5:15pm

Printing Museum Tour
Join this open-house style tour of the Printing Museum.  Artists' and Guild Members in the Book Bindery and Papermaking studios will be demonstrate the different style printing presses, discuss their craft and, answer questions. 

The museum will be open only to those on this tour.


Tuesday May 29, 2018 5:15pm - 7:00pm
The Printing Museum 1324 W. Clay Street Houston, Texas 77019

5:45pm

Houston History Boat Cruise
Limited Capacity full

Take a look back to the late 1800s when Houston was founded with Louis Aulbach, local historian and author of Buffalo Bayou: An Echo of Houston’s Wilderness Beginnings. Louis will share stories of the Allen brothers and provide historical information about the people, places and events along the bayou that helped shape Houston. Cost $55

Tuesday May 29, 2018 5:45pm - 8:00pm
Tour Departure Point - Outside of Texas T Café Marriott Marquis Houston
 
Wednesday, May 30
 

7:00am

Function Meets Aesthetic: Rebacking techniques for leather books
Limited Capacity full

The repair of damaged leather binding of books is a foundation treatment for all book conservators. It poses a constant challenge because of the need to balance the functional intention of using a book while balancing time economy when working with large collections or in private practice. In this course participants will learn and review several traditional and modern techniques for the repair of both tight and hollow back. The workshop will explore the importance of secure board attachment before the application of appropriate outer covering to re-attach the original spine and boards.

This workshop will alternate demonstrations with hands-on treatment under close supervision. Participants will gain experience lifting leather, staining leather to match historical bindings, paring leather, and rebacking in both leather and kozo paper. Discussions will explore board attachment techniques prior to covering, including joint tacketing, board slotting, extended linings, and colored kozo paper mending. There will be presentations on issues relating to leather bindings, including suitable repair leathers and papers, leather dyes, pigments, surface coatings, consolidants, adhesives, and tools for lifting and paring.

This workshop is for all experience levels, although previous work with leather would be helpful. Participants should bring their own paring knife and lifting knife. The workshop will take place in the brand-new state-of-the-art conservation lab at Texas A&M University Libraries, part of a three-year renovation of the libraries. Transportation from the Houston to College Station will be provided (about 90 minutes) and is included in the event start/end time. Lunch and breaks are included in the workshop.

Instructors
avatar for James Reid Cunningham-[PA]

James Reid Cunningham-[PA]

Director, Bookbinding and Conservation
James Reid-Cunningham is a book and paper conservator in private practice. He spent thirty years as a conservator at Harvard University and the Boston Athenaeum, and served as the President of the Guild of Book Workers from 2006 to 2010. From 2009 to 2013, he was the adjunct lecturer... Read More →
avatar for Jeanne Goodman

Jeanne Goodman

Conservator, Texas A&M University Libraries
Jeanne Goodman is conservator for the University Libraries at Texas A&M University. She received her MLIS from Simmons College with a concentration in Preservation and her undergraduate work with University of Delaware in Collections Care. She completed the full-time Bookbinding program... Read More →

Sponsors

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:00am - 6:00pm
Texas A&M University Libraries

8:30am

(Pre-session Symposium) Whose Cultural Heritage? Whose Conservation Strategy?
Limited Capacity filling up

Be part of AIC’s first Symposium on diversity, equity, inclusion and access in cultural heritage preservation. The Symposium will be divided into two parts. Part one will focus on the changing ways that museums and conservators are engaging with the diverse communities from which their collections originate. This program will be highly interactive as all as informative. 

Sessions include:
  • A panel focusing on new resources to assist conservators and collection care specialists in working collaboratively with Native American communities. The panel will also focus on collaborative conservation case studies from the National Museum of the American Indian 
  • A discussion of a recent survey on the effectiveness of Australian museums outreach efforts to the Aboriginal community.
  • A Case Study Lighting Round – hear how four different organizations engaged with diverse communities
  • Part Two will focus on what are the barriers to promoting a more diverse workforce in cultural heritage conservation and how can they be overcome. What success stories are out there and how can they be reproduced. Sessions include:
  • A review of the findings of the July – Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Art Museum Staff Demographic Survey which confirms a lack of diversity within the conservation field. Learn about some of the programs designed to foster diversity within the field
  • A discussion of the WUDPAC research study to assess the WUDPAC curriculum content and delivery through a multicultural lens 
  •  A panel of colleagues shares their individual journeys and discusses the obstacles they faced in becoming part of the conservation community.

Download a complete listing of talks with abstracts below. Lunch is included.

Moderators
avatar for Anisha Gupta

Anisha Gupta

Andrew. W. Mellon Fellow, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Anisha Gupta is the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. She is a graduate of the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation where she specialized in works on paper with a minor concentration in photographic materials. Her previous... Read More →
avatar for Kimi Taira

Kimi Taira

Assistant Conservator, Works on Paper, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco
avatar for Jennifer Hain Teper-[Fellow]

Jennifer Hain Teper-[Fellow]

Head of Preservation, University of Illinois Library
Jennifer Hain Teper serves as the Velde Preservation Librarian at the University of Illinois Libraries overseeing conservation, collections care, digital preservation, and digitization services throughout the library system. Before her current position began in 2009, she served as... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Renee S. Anderson

Renee S. Anderson

Head of Collections, National Museum of African American History and Culture
Dr. Reneé S. Anderson is the Head of Collections at the National Museum of African American History & Culture, Smithsonian Institution. She coordinates and oversees program activities related to collections management. Dr. Anderson serves as the Principal Investigator for grants... Read More →
avatar for Tom Braun-[PA]

Tom Braun-[PA]

Head of Conservation and Senior Objects Conservator, Minnesota Historical Society
Thomas J. Braun is the Head of Conservation and the Senior Objects Conservator at the Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS). Tom holds a BA in Art History from the University of Minnesota, an MA in Art History from Tufts University, and an MS in Art Conservation from the Winterthur/University... Read More →
avatar for Martina Dawley

Martina Dawley

Assistant Curator for American Indian Relations, Arizona State Museum
My research is primarily focused on the intersection of American Indians and museums, specifically in conservation. I am working on a book based on my dissertation "An Analysis of Diversifying Museum Studies: American Indians in Conservation." I will speak on this topic during AIC's... Read More →
avatar for Shannon A. Brogdon Grantham

Shannon A. Brogdon Grantham

Photograph Conservator, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
avatar for Susanne Gänsicke-[PA]

Susanne Gänsicke-[PA]

Head of Antiquities Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum
Susanne Gänsicke is the Senior Conservator of Antiquities at the Getty Villa in Malibu, starting mid-July. Since 1990, she was employed at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, most recently as Conservator in Objects Conservation. She has worked on active excavations in Egypt and Sudan... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Adams Hebard-[PA]

Barbara Adams Hebard-[PA]

Conservator, Boston College Library
Barbara Adams Hebard, Conservator of the John J. Burns Library at Boston College, is a graduate of the North Bennet Street School bookbinding program. Ms. Hebard is a member of the Guild of Book Workers and the Ticknor Society. She is a Professional member of The American Institute... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Mallinckrodt

Catherine Mallinckrodt

Conservator, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Casey Mallinckrodt received a MA in conservation at the UCLA/Getty Program in Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials and previously received a MFA from Yale University. She has been a Kress Fellow in Object Conservation at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and worked... Read More →
avatar for Caryl McFarlane

Caryl McFarlane

Consultant, HBCU Alliance of Museums and Galleries
avatar for Kelly McHugh-[PA]

Kelly McHugh-[PA]

Supervisory Collections Manager, Cultural Resources Center. The National Museum of the American Indian. Smithsonian Institution
Kelly McHugh recently became the Supervisory Collections Manager at the National Museum of the American Indian. Prior she served as an object conservator, when she began working for the museum in 1996 in New York, based at the museum’s former storage facility in the Bronx. There... Read More →
avatar for Erin E. Murphy

Erin E. Murphy

Marshall Steel Fellow, Archaeological Conservation, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Marshall Steel Fellow, Archaleological Conservation at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Erin is a recent MA and MSc graduate from University College London where she studied object conservation. During work at the Horniman Museum and Gardens in London she specialized in ethnographic... Read More →
avatar for Yoshi Nishio-[Fellow]

Yoshi Nishio-[Fellow]

Conservator and President, Nishio Conservation Studio
Business hours: Monday-Friday 9-6 by appointment | Established: 1994 | | YOSHIYUKI NISHIO, Chief Conservator | One of the leading conservators of Asian scroll and screen paintings in the US. His background combines traditional apprenticeship and academic training. Received a... Read More →
avatar for Debbie Hess Norris-[Fellow]

Debbie Hess Norris-[Fellow]

Chair of the Art Conservation Department and Professor of Photograph Conservation, Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation
Debra Hess Norris is Chair of the Art Conservation Department and Professor of Photograph Conservation at the University of Delaware. Since 1985, Norris has authored more than 30 articles and book chapters on care and treatment of photographic materials, emergency response, ethics... Read More →
avatar for Sheila Payaqui

Sheila Payaqui

Dept. Head & Senior Conservator, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →
avatar for Landis Smith

Landis Smith

Project Conservator, State Museums and Monuments of New Mexico
Landis Smith is Projects Conservator at the Museums of New Mexico Conservation Unit, working primarily with the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. She is also Collaborative Conservation Programs Consultant at the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research, and... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Tedone-[PA]

Melissa Tedone-[PA]

Book & Library Conservator, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
Melissa Tedone is Book & Library Conservator at Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library. She holds a PhD in Slavic literary history from Yale University, and an MSIS with a Certificate of Advanced Study in the Conservation of Library and Archival Materials from UT Austin. In addition... Read More →
avatar for Lalena A. Vellanoweth

Lalena A. Vellanoweth

Conservator, Private Practice

Sponsors
avatar for Sirma Americas

Sirma Americas

Sirma Americas
MuseumSpace is a comprehensive Museum Management Software Suite. Use the platform’s semantic functionalities to organize records, gather cultural objects, plan and manage upcoming exhibitions, work with crucial documents, simplify image management, create reports, and more. MuseumSpace... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:30am - 4:15pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

Space Center Houston - VIP Tour
Limited Capacity filling up

Join us for a behind the scenes VIP tour. This tour will take you to the limited access parts of the Space Center such as the viechle mock-up area where you can see emerging NASA technology in action. We will have access to the museum exhibits and will have opportunities to discuss the issues that develop when caring for such diverse objects. The Space Center wants to customize a tour for us. Few groups get the access we will have. Those who register before December 31 will have an opportunity to participate in the refinement of the tour. Note family members are welcome on this tour, but the minimum age set by NASA is 14. Cost $179 includes lunch

Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:30am - 5:00pm
Space Center Houston 1601 E NASA Pkwy, Houston, TX 77058

9:00am

Bayou Bike Tour
Limited Capacity full

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
TBA

9:00am

GC Lasers Demo
Live Laser Cleaning Demos
GC Lasers Systems will be doing continuous on demand laser cleaning demonstations from 9am to 12:00 pm on Wed. May 30 

Instructors

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Montrose Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Packing, Crating, and Shipping Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

This workshop will focus on the nuts and bolts of safely packing and shipping art and artifacts. With a focus on materials and methods, attendees will be invited to bring their questions on everything from crate construction to packing materials, from soft packing to organizing the logistics of shipping everything from a single artwork to an entire exhibition. Examples of crate standards, packing methods, and various packing solutions will be available for attendees to both view and interact with. Case studies and demonstrations will provide attendees with a better understanding of the varied approached to caring for art in transit, as well as an introduction to the types of materials that are most commonly used in fine art crates.

Instructors
avatar for Aaron Salik

Aaron Salik

TALAS
Aaron has worked at TALAS for 19 years, navigating its growth and success side by side with Jillian Salik as the second generation of the Salik family's leadership of the company.  His background in mechanical engineering proves value for understand the scientific side of creating... Read More →
avatar for Jason Carey-Sheppard

Jason Carey-Sheppard

Project Manager, Terry Dowd Inc.
I have a background in Philosophy and Visual Arts, and received an MFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts in 2012 with an emphasis in sculpture and extended media. Since 2010, I have worked in many roles in the art-logistics world, from preparator and fabricator to registrar and... Read More →
avatar for Jillian Salik

Jillian Salik

TALAS
2018 marks my 10th year working at TALAS, a supplier of specialty art supplies with a focus on art conservation, restoration, archival storage and bookbinding.  In 2011, I helped to establish the archival box making division of the company.  Building on my experience as a Fine Arts... Read More →
avatar for Meg Colbert

Meg Colbert

Director of Production, Boxart Inc
I have worked at Boxart Inc., a fine art packing and crating company, since 1997.In that time I have packed art in museums, galleries, artist’s studios, auctionhouses, and in private collections. I am currently the Director of Production atBoxart, where I both help to design and... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

From Response to Recovery; from Recovery to Response – Hurricane Lessons Learned in Galveston
Limited Capacity seats available

During this day-long workshop, participants will learn about the damage caused by the hurricanes that have affected Galveston Island – from the storm of 1900 that fundamentally shaped the city to the most recent damage caused Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Rosenberg Library staff member Casey Edward Greene, author of “Through a Night of Horrors: Voices from the 1900 Galveston Storm,” will address how that historic storm changed the city of Galveston. FAIC’s National Heritage Responders will speak about their response efforts following Hurricane Ike in 2008. Team members responded to damage at the Rosenberg Library, Moody Mansion, the Lone Star Flight Museum, Open Gate, and sites managed by the Galveston History Foundation, including the Ashton Villa and the 1861 Custom House. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to tour some of these sites.
The workshop will provide an opportunity to evaluate how a city has historically responded to threats of natural disasters, look at the response and recovery efforts of FAIC’s National Heritage Responders as well as other efforts on Galveston Island following Hurricane Ike, and a review of preparedness measures put in place for Hurricane Harvey. In looking at the longer process of recovery and how it informs future preparedness, this workshop allows for a more thoughtful analysis of the success of the current response protocols, as well as the prioritization of tasks in during that extended period of recovery. As collecting institutions are encouraged to do what they can to mitigate risk, the long view of recovery can provide helpful clues for what actions will translate to successful mitigation strategies. Participants will not need a background in emergency protocols in order to benefit from this analysis of the recovery process and how it informs preparedness measures.
Transportation will be provided between the Marriot Marquis Houston and Galveston Island.

Speakers
avatar for Casey Edward Greene

Casey Edward Greene

Head of Special Collections, Rosenberg Library
avatar for Vicki Lee

Vicki Lee

Senior Conservator, National and Archives and Records Administration
Vicki Lee is currently a senior conservator at the National Archives. Vicki is the former Director of Conservation at the Maryland State Archives. She is a member of FAIC-NHR Working Group and has reponded to disasters locally, nationally, and internationally. Vicki is especially... Read More →
avatar for Karen Pavelka-[PA]

Karen Pavelka-[PA]

Senior Lecturer, UT Austin School of Information
Karen L. Pavelka is a full-time lecturer in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. She was been intimately involved with developing the conservation program when it moved from Columbia University in 1993 and continues to investigate the role of conservation... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Rosenberg Library 2310 Sealy St, Galveston, TX 77550

9:00am

Preparation and Use of Paraloid B-72 Adhesive
Limited Capacity filling up

B-72 was introduced for use as an adhesive by Stephen Koob in 1986, and has unfortunately not been used to its full potential (as evidenced by recent papers and comments at the 2017 Annual Meeting). Workshop participants will be introduced to a new method of preparation that allows conservation professionals to easily make up the adhesive to varying concentrations for use on a variety of materials (primarily ceramics, glass, stone, bone, ivory, and even some wood). The prepared adhesive is then poured into empty adhesive tubes, which are then closed and labeled for use.

The workshop will include a brief presentation on the use of solvent adhesives, particularly focusing on Paraloid B-72. The presentation will be followed by demonstrations of proper preparation (different consistencies for different materials, such as ceramics, glass, bone, wood) and methods of application (and clean-up). Participants will also gain hands-on experience assembling broken ceramics, glass, and other materials.

Instructors
avatar for Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Chief Conservator, Corning Museum of Glass
Stephen Koob is responsible for the care and preservation of all of the Museum’s collections. This includes cleaning the glass and making recommendations for its handling, storage, display, and movement. He also oversees the maintenance and repair of objects in the Museum’s... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Respirator Fit Test
Limited Capacity seats available

Whether you are using hazardous chemicals in your laboratory or working with mold-infested artifacts after a flood, you need to be protected with a properly fitting respirator. This workshop will provide the participant with access to an online lecture on respirator selection, care, and use, as well as a 15-minute, individual appointment for a personal respirator fit test, ensuring an acceptable, face-to-facepiece seal/fit of their respirator. The individual appointment provides an opportunity for participants to ask any specific questions, and to “shop” for a new half-mask, air-purifying respirator from the Committee’s selection of samples. You should bring your personal respirator if you have one.


This AIC Respirator Fit Test Program is targeted towards conservators who may not have access to a Safety Professional to conduct the test or do not have respirator fit testing available through their employer, but is open to all interested parties. This workshop is in accordance with the U.S. OSHA Standard (29CFR1910.134 - Respiratory Protection). The online lecture and fit test appointments will be conducted by a Certified Industrial Hygienist.


Individuals wishing to be fit for a respirator MUST:
  1. Register for the Respirator Fit Test “workshop” at the AIC Annual Meeting.
  2. Watch the REQUIRED online lecture and take the corresponding quiz.
  3. Schedule a fit test appointment. The appointments will be scheduled to take place in 15-minute intervals from 9:00am - 5:00pm on Wednesday, May 30, 2018.
  4. Complete a REQUIRED medical evaluation within twelve months PRIOR to your fit test. The medical evaluation must be performed by a healthcare professional. If you prefer not to use your own healthcare provider, FAIC can suggest a clinic that will review your evaluation questionnaire (additional $25 cost).
  5. Bring your Respirator Medical Clearance Approval Form signed by a healthcare professional to your scheduled appointment and get fit tested.
Once you register for the Respirator Fit Test, you will receive an email with the forms and instructions for steps to completed before the Annual Meeting.


Appointments are limited. The last day to register for a Respirator Fit Test is May 16.
Cost: $39 (non-CIPP members) /$0 (CIPP members)
With the generous support of the Conservators in Private Practice (CIPP) Specialty Group, fit tests are being offered for free to CIPP members. If you are a CIPP Member, please contact your specialty group chair for the discount code.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 5:00pm
Clear Lake B Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

10:00am

Bayou Bend and Rienzi
Limited Capacity filling up

Bayou Bend is the MFAH house museum for American decorative arts and paintings. Displayed in the former home of Houston civic leader and philanthropist Ima Hogg (1882–1975), the collection is one of the finest showcases of American furnishings, silver, ceramics, and paintings in the world. The house is situated on 14 acres of organically maintained gardens in Houston’s historic River Oaks neighborhood. Formerly the home of philanthropists Carroll Sterling Masterson and Harris Masterson III, Rienzi was designed by prominent Houston architect John Staub in 1952. Opened to the public in 1999, Rienzi houses a substantial collection of European decorative arts, paintings, furnishings, porcelain, and miniatures. On this special conservation-focused tour, you will not only delight in an amazing decorative arts collection but see from an insiders point of view the special conservation challenges associated with the property. Cost $69

Sponsors
avatar for Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Established in 1900, the MFAH is the largest cultural institution in the southwest region. The Museum’s main campus is located in the heart of Houston’s Museum District, and comprises the Audrey Jones Beck Building, the Caroline Wiess Law Building, the Glassell School of Art... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 4:30pm
Tour Departure Point - Outside of Texas T Café Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

Texas A&M Libraries New Conservation Lab Tour
Limited Capacity full

Join your colleagues on this special access tour of the libraries’ new preservation spaces and hybrid conservation lab, in addition to tours of collection highlights from the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives. Texas A&M University campus is located in College Station, about 90 minutes from Houston and transportation is provided. After your pleasant drive through Texas country, you will arrive just in time for lunch, included in this event, and your tour experience will begin in Cushing.
 
  • Presentation about the design and build of the Preservation spaces and conservation lab as part the overall Libraries’ renovation, a 7.4-million-dollar three year project.
  • Tours of preservation spaces and conservation lab
  • A behind-the-scenes view of the annual Book History Workshop*, including a period-accurate working English common press
  • A guided tour of the exhibit: The Angel in the Marble: Selections from the Berger-Cloonan Collection of Decorated Paper
  • Highlights from one of the largest Science Fiction and Fantasy research collections in the world, which includes the archives of George R.R. Martin, creator of Game of Thrones.
 
  Support for this tour has been generously provided by Texas A&M University Libraries.  

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 6:30pm
Texas A&M University Libraries

11:45am

Houston Natural Science Museum - Offsite Collection Storage and Museum Tour
Limited Capacity full

Experience a rarely offered tour of the offsite collection storage of the Natural History Museum Houston. Followed by a conservation focused collection tour lead by AIC members Ron Harvey and Renee Stein who have worked on the museum's collections. A box lunch to enjoy on the way to the collections storage will be provided. Cost $39

Wednesday May 30, 2018 11:45am - 5:30pm
Houston Natural Science Museum 5555 Hermann Park Dr, Houston,TX 77030

12:30pm

The Ultimate Menil Campus Tour
Limited Capacity filling up

Go behind the scenes at the world-famous Menil collection. Tour the main museum conservation spaces. Special collection tours of the Twombly Gallery, the Flavin installation, and the Byzantine Fresco Chapel. We will also have the rare opportunity to visit the Menil House in River Oaks. Cost $39

Wednesday May 30, 2018 12:30pm - 5:30pm
Menil Collection 1533 Sul Ross St, Houston, TX 77006

1:00pm

Scratch Removal and Polishing Treatment for High-Gloss Plastic Surfaces
Limited Capacity full

Contemporary artists such as Anish Kapoor, John McCracken and DeWain Valentine are known for their large-scale sculptures with industrial high-gloss finishes. The surfaces - made of polyester resin, acrylic glass, or automotive paint, for example - seem robust, but are in fact extremely delicate and prone to scratches. The slightest defect in these pristine, highly reflective surfaces can affect their visual continuity and compromise the integrity of the artwork. Contemporary art conservators are routinely confronted with the need to execute polishing treatments, of various scales, for sculptures made of plastic, as well as treat plastic elements that are integral part of face-mounted photographs, frames, and display cases. This workshop aims to address these concerns in two parts.

This workshop will provide insight into the various materials and making processes applied by artists, enumerate the most common causes of damage - including abrasions and imprints caused by packing material or inappropriate handling - and will illustrate damage patterns typical for high-gloss plastic surfaces. The workshop will include demonstrations of treatment methods for removing scratches and restoring the high-gloss appearance of plastic finishes, applicable both locally and to large-scale surfaces. Step-by-step instruction of various sanding and polishing techniques (both by hand and using machines) will be included. The instructors will also share insight on products and brands that have proven most effective, recommendations on how to control the procedure, and the physical and chemical limits of the treatment. Participants will have the opportunity to test products and methods on mock-ups.

Instructors
avatar for Delia Müller Wüsten

Delia Müller Wüsten

Associate Conservator, Contemporary Conservation Ltd.
Delia Müller-Wüsten has been an Associate Conservator at Contemporary Conservation Ltd. since 2012. She specializes in the conservation of artworks made of synthetic materials such as latex and synthetic resins, and has expertise on highly-polished surfaces from artists such as... Read More →
avatar for Giuliana Moretto

Giuliana Moretto

Associate Conservator, Contemporary Conservation Ltd
As Associate Conservator at Contemporary Conservation Ltd. since 2009, Giuliana focuses on the conservation of objects and paintings in non-traditional materials – including bubble gum, chocolate and plastics – and innovative artistic techniques, such as Inkjet printing, vacuum-formed... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Tanglewood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

1:30pm

Scholarly Writing: From Abstract to Publication
This 90-minute pre-meeting session is open to all with an interest in scholarly publications, including those with experience publishing that may wish to offer advice to others.

PROGRAM

Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez, Editor-in-Chief JAIC, “Introduction: Why publish in JAIC?” and will cover:
  • Aims and scope of the journal
  • Preparing your paper (content and format)
  • References
  • Checklist before submission
  • Peer review

Robin Hanson, Associate Editor for Textiles JAIC, “The outline and the importance of a writing a compelling abstract”
  • Creating and developing your article (the outline)
  • The abstract seen as the initial “sales tool” for a good paper
  • How Figures and Tables support the results presented in a manuscript

George Cooper, Managing Editor, Journals Anthropology, Conservation, Museum Studies & Heritage, Taylor & Francis, "How to get published and the benefits of being published: the publisher's perspective 

Bonnie Naugle, JAIC Managing Editor, "Postprint to JAIC"

Roundtable discussion: What do JAIC editors look for? - Work which will stand up to peer review (quality / language),  - novel to the conservation community, - original research, - research that is interesting to the journal’s readership. Q&A + Examples of common mistakes found in articles (15 min)

Speakers
avatar for George Cooper

George Cooper

Managing Editor, Taylor & Francis
avatar for Robin Hanson-[Fellow]

Robin Hanson-[Fellow]

Associate Conservator of Textiles, Cleveland Museum of Art
Robin Hanson has managed the textile conservation lab at the Cleveland Museum of Art for the past 17 years. In 1997 she completed graduate training in conservation, with a specialization in textiles, at the Winterthur / University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. She is a... Read More →
avatar for Julio M. Del Hoyo-Meléndez-[PA]

Julio M. Del Hoyo-Meléndez-[PA]

Research Scientist, National Museum in Krakow
Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez holds a PhD in science and conservation of cultural heritage from the Department of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage of the Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain. He received a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in chemistry... Read More →
avatar for Bonnie Naugle

Bonnie Naugle

Communications & Membership Director, American Institute of Conservation
Bonnie Naugle joined AIC in 2012. As Communications & Membership Director, she manages AIC’s print and online publications, including AIC News, the Journal of the American Institute of Conservation, and annual meeting print materials; and oversees the membership team. She also... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Montrose Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

1:30pm

Installation and Use of Automated Thread Count Software
Limited Capacity seats available

Thread counting software for both Windows and OS X platforms is now available for museum use. The software takes as input images of the paintings that reveals the canvas support (typically x-rays but also verso photographs), interacts with the user to focus the computations, and then produces a detailed thread count for the entire image. The software allows thread count information to be incorporated into a database and individual database entries shared with colleagues.

In this workshop, the use of detailed thread count information for paintings on canvas will be demonstrated. Copies of the thread counting software will be distributed and installed on user computers. Because the software must be focused on the canvas at hand, several case studies will be presented and participants will be provided examples to test their skills on setting up the software. Once thread count results are obtained, the value of a thread count database in finding canvas matches will be demonstrated.

Transportation will be provided from the Marriot Marquis Houston at 1:00PM. Transportation will also be provided back to the Marriot Marquis Houston following the workshop.

Instructors
avatar for Don Johnson

Don Johnson

Professor, Rice University
Don H. Johnson is the J.S. Abercrombie Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University, Houston, Texas. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined M.I.T. Lincoln... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:30pm - 5:30pm
Rice University 6100 Main St, Houston, TX 77005

2:00pm

Rice University and Broadacres Walking Tour
Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Talking Grants – Hear from IMLS Grant Reviewers
Developing a competitive proposal for an IMLS collections stewardship grant takes considerable time and thought, but the rewards can be well worth the effort. With amounts ranging up to $250,000, an IMLS grant can help an institution make significant strides in improving collections care through conservation surveys, treatments, environmental improvements, and building capacity among its staff and volunteers through specialized consultations and training.

Crucial to IMLS’s funding decisions each year are the reviews prepared by peers in the field. Each application is read by three to six experts, who provide scores and evaluative comments in accordance with a set of criteria identified by IMLS. In addition to being available to IMLS staff, these scores and comments are provided verbatim to the applicants, who in turn use them to improve their projects and/or their next applications.
 
What applicants do not experience, however, are the conversations that occur during panel meetings. Typically spirited and intense, the exchanges belie the passion that collections people feel for their work. Occasionally, they can become heated when opinions about techniques or the likelihood of success differ. Without fail, though, in each gathering, at least one panelist will say, “Oh, I wish I could talk directly to them” or “If only we could get this across in advance,” and others quickly line up in agreement. Everyone knows the work that’s being proposed is warranted, and they share a deep desire to see collections cared for in the best ways possible and preserved for use by future generations.
 
In this session, three collections care professionals with deep experience as IMLS grant applicants, grantees, and reviewers will speak candidly about what makes a successful grant proposal. Speaking from their personal experiences and knowing first-hand what it takes to structure and carry out a successful collections care project, they will share their opinions about what to include, what to emphasize, what to ignore, and how to present it in order to get good scores on a proposal.
 
The session will be casual but focused, employing a talk-show format, and questions from the audience will be heartily welcomed.

IMLS One-on-One Appointments
IMLS will be offering 30 minute one-one consultation appointments on May 30-31 for those considering submitting a grant proposal. Register for the session online and you will be contacted after April 1 to schedule an appointment that fits your schedule  

Moderators
avatar for Connie Bodner

Connie Bodner

Supervisory Grants Management Specialist, Institute of Museum and Library Services

Speakers
avatar for Gretchen Anderson

Gretchen Anderson

Conservator, Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Gretchen Anderson heads the Section of Conservation at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Her research interests focus on preventive conservation practices for natural science collections, including environmental and integrated pest management. To that end, she works with curatorial... Read More →
avatar for Dawn Kimbrel

Dawn Kimbrel

Registrar, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology
Bringing professional experience from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and, most recently, the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Dawn Kimbrel currently serves as Registrar at Brown University’s Haffenreffer... Read More →
avatar for Kelsey Monahan

Kelsey Monahan

Museum Program Specialist, Institute of Museum and Library Services
Kelsey Monahan is a Program Specialist in the Office of Museum Services at the Institute of Museum and Library Services. In addition to assisting with all museum discretionary grant programs at IMLS, she works closely with the Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services Program... Read More →
avatar for Emily Williams-[Fellow]

Emily Williams-[Fellow]

Conservator, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Conservator of Archaeological Materials at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 1995 to present. I have worked at museums and sites in England, Turkey, Australia, Egypt, Bermuda, Syria, Belgium and Iraq. Currently pursuing a PhD through the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

Houston 2018: Storytelling as Preservation
A panel discussion on storytelling as preservation featuring Deana Haggag, President and CEO of United States Artists, MacArthur award winning artist Rick Lowe, and queer migrant poet and cultural organizier and activist Sonia Guiñansaca will be held on Wednesday, May 30th, 2018, from 4:30 to 6pm.

This free event is organized by Untold Stories (https://www.untoldstories.live), a non-profit organization committed to an art conservation profession that represents and preserves a fuller spectrum of human cultural heritage.

For more information,visit https://www.untoldstories.live/houston-2018.

Moderators
avatar for Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Associate Director/Conservator, Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Sanchita Balachandran is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She teaches courses related to the technical study and analysis of ancient objects, as... Read More →
avatar for Julianna Ly

Julianna Ly

Graduate Fellow, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
avatar for LaStarsha McGarity

LaStarsha McGarity

2nd Year Graduate Fellow, Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo State)
LaStarsha is a graduate of Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas, where she received a BA in Art and Chemistry. She volunteered extensively at University Museum on TSU's campus. After completing her BA, she was the Director's Fellow at the Cleveland Museum of Art. LaStarsha... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sonia Guiñansaca

Sonia Guiñansaca

Queer Migrant Poet, Cultural Organizer, and Activist
Sonia Guiñansaca is a Queer Migrant Poet, Cultural Organizer, and Activist from Harlem by way of Ecuador. Guiñansaca a VONA/Voices alumni has performed at El Museo Del Barrio, The Nuyorican Poets Cafe, the NY Poetry Festival, Galleria de La Raza, The Met, and featured on NBC, PBS... Read More →
avatar for Deana Haggag

Deana Haggag

President & CEO, United States Artists
Deana Haggag is the President & CEO of United States Artists, a national arts funding organization based in Chicago, IL. Before joining USA in February 2017, she was the Executive Director of The Contemporary, a nomadic and non-collecting art museum in Baltimore, MD, for four years... Read More →
avatar for Rick Lowe

Rick Lowe

Founder, Project Row Houses
Rick Lowe is an artist, a 2014 MacArthur Fellow and one of the founders of Project Row Houses, located in Houston’s Historic Third Ward, one of the city’s oldest African-American neighborhoods. Project Row Houses is a community platform that enriches lives through art with an... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

5:30pm

NHR Business Meeting
Meeting of National Heritage Responders to discuss activities over the past year and the future of the program. Non-NHR members are welcome! 

Moderators
avatar for Jessica Unger

Jessica Unger

Emergency Programs Coordinator, Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
Jessica (Jess) joined FAIC as its Emergency Programs Coordinator in May 2015. Prior to joining FAIC, Jessica was Director of External Affairs for Heritage Preservation, and their Emergency Programs Assistant before that. Jessica studied historical archaeology at the College of William... Read More →

Wednesday May 30, 2018 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Westchase Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:30pm

Publications Committee Meeting
Publications Committee meeting, chaired by Sarah Reidell.

Moderators
avatar for Bonnie Naugle

Bonnie Naugle

Communications & Membership Director, American Institute of Conservation
Bonnie Naugle joined AIC in 2012. As Communications & Membership Director, she manages AIC’s print and online publications, including AIC News, the Journal of the American Institute of Conservation, and annual meeting print materials; and oversees the membership team. She also... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Reidell-[Fellow]

Sarah Reidell-[Fellow]

Margy E. Meyerson Head of Conservation, University of Pennsylvania
Sarah is the Margy E. Meyerson Head of Conservation at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. A Fellow of AIC, she is the AIC Publications Committee Chair and has served in various elected and volunteer positions... Read More →

Wednesday May 30, 2018 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Clear Lake A Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

6:00pm

Early Exhibit Hall Access and Light Reception
Spend some more relaxed time with our Exhibitors. For the first time, our exhibit hall will open the night before the start of the main conference. From 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm enjoy light bites and cash bars - but more importantly, the chance to view the latest in products and services for the conservation field!

Wednesday May 30, 2018 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Texas Ballrooms E-H (Exhibit Hall) Marriott Marquis Houston

7:15pm

Bat Colony by Boat Tour
Limited Capacity full

Join us on a leisurely boat tour of the Houston Bayou to view the bat colony of Waugh Bridge. Learn more about these 250,000 magnificent Mexican free-tailed bats that share the city with us.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:15pm - 9:00pm
Tour Departure Point - Outside of Texas T Café Marriott Marquis Houston

7:30pm

AIC Dinner at Pappadeaux Seafood
Limited Capacity seats available

Enjoy a relaxing dinner after your visit to the exhibit hall - join us at this Houston favorite for a good meal and good company. This will be a great opportunity to connect with old friends and meet new people before the start of the conference. Cost is $63 which includes a 3-course dinner and 1 drink (including tax and gratuity). Additional drinks available for purchase.   
This restaurant is a 3-minute walk from the conference hotel, just past Grotto and the convention center. 

1001 Avenida De Las Americas, Houston TX

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Pappadeaux Seafood

7:30pm

Emerging Conservation Professionals Network (ECPN) Happy Hour
Kick off the conference by connecting with peers and networking with established professionals at ECPN's annual Happy Hour, sponsored by the Getty Conservation Institute. Enjoy amazing food and even better company. Grotto Downtown is located accross the street from the Marriott Marquis Houston.

Sponsors
avatar for Getty Conservation Institute

Getty Conservation Institute

The Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) works internationally to advanceconservation practice in the visual arts—broadly interpreted to include objects,collections, architecture, and sites. The Institute serves the conservationcommunity through scientific research, education and... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Grotto Downtown

8:00pm

UK and Overseas Graduate Programs in Conservation Reunion
Join us in the bar area of Biggio's, an upscale sports bar connected to the Marriott Marquis conference hotel, from 8-11pm on Wednesday, May 30th.  (note the time change from the original email)

Please there will be a West Dean College Reunion occurring at the same time and location. The two reunions will be adjacent to each other. 


Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Biggio’s Sports Bar (Marriott Marquis)

9:00pm

West Dean College Reunion
Please note there will also be a UK Graduate Schools Reunion happening at the same time and location. The two reunions will be happening adjacent to each other.  


Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00pm - 11:00pm
Biggio’s Sports Bar (Marriott Marquis)
 
Thursday, May 31
 

8:20am

Opening General Session - Welcome and Awards
Moderators
avatar for Margaret Holben Ellis-[Fellow]

Margaret Holben Ellis-[Fellow]

Chair; Eugene Thaw Professor of Paper Conservation, Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU
Margaret Holben Ellis received her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Barnard College, Columbia University (1975) and completed her Master’s Degree in Art History and Advanced Certificate in Conservation at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1979). In... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 8:20am - 9:00am
Texas Ballrooms A-D Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

Materiality and Immateriality in Conserving Contemporary Art
Conservators of contemporary art have responded to conceptual, ephemeral, and time-based media with new theoretical models and strategies for practice. Along with the need for new approaches to manage variability and change on a conceptual level, material matters persist in the new objects of contemporary art. Collected materials include deteriorated plastics, desiccated food, and obsolete playback equipment. Following artist expressions about their work, these objects may be conserved in a traditional manner or may be allowed to deteriorate over time. They may also be replicated or be migrated to new technologies.
 An examination of recent literature reveals tensions in discussions of materiality and immateriality for contemporary conservation objects. Often these tensions derive from artist statements, or directives regarding the future disposition of their work. Some authors write about the language of materials, with concern when unintended alteration communicates new meaning to the viewer. Others point to patina that develops on material manifestations of conceptual art that were meant to be ephemeral but were nonetheless collected. Interviews with artists expose complex responses to the status of these accidental testaments from past installations.  Time-based media conservators face similar dilemmas, for example with commercial monitors purchased somewhat randomly by artists such as Nam June Paik. They accrue historic value over time and are seen as important evidence of the past, regardless of the artist’s original intentions.
Some recent models for understanding materiality and immateriality in contemporary art are adapted from theory across the humanities and social sciences. Nelson Goodman’s distinction between autographic (object-based) works and allographic (performed and re-produced) helps us understand authenticity in variable works that radically change through migration and replication.  Similarly, the model of object biography was adapted from anthropology to conceptualize both physical changes and the layering of social meanings that artworks accrue over the course of their lives.
Conservators of contemporary art also draw from theory, practice, and professional ethics developed for traditional conservation objects to help them navigate new issues around materiality and authenticity. Recent attention has been given to the likes of Ruskin, le-Duc, Riegl, and Brandi to revisit earlier questions of preservation vs. use, noble and vile patina, and aesthetic reintegration in conservation. Notions of risk, sustainability, and minimal intervention also influence recent thinking about the materials of contemporary art.
This presentation will trace how material and immaterial matters are treated in contemporary art conservation literature and emerging models for practice. Through analysis of the literature, an argument will be made that the values and professional ethics developed for traditional conservation objects serve new models for objects of contemporary art that are less bound by traditional material concerns.

Speakers
avatar for Glenn Wharton-[Fellow]

Glenn Wharton-[Fellow]

Clinical Professor, New York University, Museum Studies
Glenn Wharton is a Clinical Professor in Museum Studies at New York University where he teaches and writes about managing contemporary art and social justice programming in museums. He is the co-director of the Artist Archive Initiative at NYU, a project designed to promote research... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Texas Ballrooms A-D Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

Practicing what we preach: An argument for the recognition and preservation of a material culture of conservation
Though we often think of modern conservation as a “young” field, the truth is that our history becomes longer with every passing day. The importance of establishing a historical record for our field has long been recognized. Substantial progress has been made through efforts such as the establishment in 1975 of the FAIC Oral History Project and more recent scholarship that considers the history of key figures, institutions, and events. Some important aspects of our history, however, have still received little to no attention. This presentation argues that, in addition to the development of a historical record, it is important to recognize and preserve the material culture of conservation. As exemplified by the theme of this year’s AIC meeting, the conservation field is partly defined by materials: those that we preserve, but also those that we use in our work. So, too, is our history. Examples of this material culture range from those objects which are already symbolic of conservation, such as Edward Forbe’s pigment collection, to historical treatment records and photography, to previously conserved objects that now serve not only as an example of the history of their own genres, but also as an indication of conservation's past and development. The preservation and future study of these objects in the context of the history of conservation will be integral to the success of ongoing scholarship in the history of conservation and of closely allied fields such as museology and art history. Study of field-specific material culture has long been an important aspect of the history of medicine, science, and archeology. This presentation will use examples of this scholarship and its effects to argue for the importance of recognizing the existence of a material culture of conservation, identifying which artifacts may fit into this category, and taking steps to preserve them now. After all, if we do not preserve our own history, who will?

Speakers
avatar for Carrie McNeal

Carrie McNeal

PhD Student, Brock University
Carrie McNeal is a student in the Interdisciplinary Humanities PhD program at Brock University in St. Catherine, Ontario. Her current research explores the history of conservation in the museum setting. She is the former Director of Conservation at The Strong in Rochester, New York... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Texas Ballrooms A-D Marriott Marquis Houston

10:00am

Break in the Exhibit Hall
Thursday May 31, 2018 10:00am - 10:45am
Texas Ballrooms E-H (Exhibit Hall) Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

Preserving Innovation: Considering the Treatment and Materiality of 3D Printed Objects in Museum Collections
As of 2018, it is now possible to 3D print a vast array of object-types including art, jewellery, clothing, medication, bones, and human organs. 3D printing also has an emerging presence in the cultural heritage and museum sectors: there have been 3D printing exhibitions at various institutions, with an increasing number of 3D printed objects accessioned into the permanent collections of museums. Despite the increased popularity of 3D printing and its use in the museum world, it is curious that greater consideration has not yet been given to the conservation of 3D printed objects. There seems to be no academic information or journal articles that describe the correct handling or treatment of 3D manufactured objects, with most literature focused on 3D scanning and printing as methods of digital preservation and replication. Due to the dearth of information on the conservation of 3D printed objects, this presentation will attempt to begin a dialogue on the matter. The intent is to demonstrate the complexity and scope of knowledge required for the conservation of 3D printed objects, as well as how conservators should understand and subsequently approach their unique and varied materiality. In 2013, London’s Science Museum put on a temporary exhibition entitled “3D: Printing the Future.” The exhibition included approximately 600 3D printed objects, which were composed of many different materials (including plaster, plastic, metal, ceramic, and animal cells) and were manufactured through a wide range of 3D printing processes. In 2015, close to 10% of the objects were accessioned into the permanent collection. Conservators at the museum must now devise a treatment plan with no information or precedent to guide them, as they confront the possibility of future degradation or damage to the objects. This presentation is based upon research and work as an objects conservator at the museum, and the contention that in order to provide optimal care and implement appropriate treatments upon an object, or group of objects, there must be a basic understanding of the object-type. The Science Museum’s exhibition “3D: Printing the Future” is an ideal lens through which to view the potential for conserving 3D printed objects as they are produced today. Expanding upon the exhibition, the paper discusses the applicability of existing conservation guidelines and practice when considering 3D printed objects. As new materials are developed, and 3D printed objects become more integrated into contemporary culture and manufacturing, they will undoubtedly become increasingly accessioned into museum collections. It will, therefore, become essential to understand how to ensure their longevity. This presentation confronts many issues, including the need for adequate documentation, the possibility of replication, the extent to which 3D printing presents new conservation challenges, and, significantly, how can and should these objects be conserved?

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Applebaum

Vanessa Applebaum

Objects Conservator, Science Museum, London
Vanessa Applebaum is an Objects Conservator at the Science Museum in London. Her research interests include the conservation of modern materials, Byzantine art, ethnographic and medical collections, as well as the public understanding of the field of conservation.


Thursday May 31, 2018 11:00am - 11:30pm
Texas Ballrooms A-D Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

The Physical Nature of Digital & What it Means for Conservation
In working with digital collections, we are often asked, “What is digital? Where are the collection materials actually held? What does digital collection’s storage look like?” In an increasingly wifi-bluetooth-mobile-data world, digital can seem invisible to us as end users, however the digital world is highly dependent on technology that has material form- physical hardware, network wiring, and often entire buildings of carefully monitored and controlled infrastructure. What does this mean for art conservators? The material science of digital files held in our care is important to consider: how a file is constructed and how it tells us how it needs to be opened, played, or understood. However, equally important is the storage that those files are held on, how they are transferred from one place to another, and how they are handled at each stage of this move. What are the physical aspects that make up the storage environments of digital storage? And which of these aspects are critical for us to understand as conservators? The NDSR Levels of Digital Preservation provide a nice one-sheet listing tiered guidelines for storage, integrity, security, etc. for a digital preservation system, and the OAIS reference model gives us a framework from which to build out our digital preservation storage. But what is digital preservation storage, anyway? Is it specific hardware that is different than other digital storage that we purchase for our personal lives? For the past 10 years, the Library of Congress has been convening an annual “Storage Meeting” to discuss digital storage for collections material among collection holders and storage technologists. And out of the iPres2016 workshop, and now in draft form, is an initiative to create guidelines for collecting organizations on Preservation Storage Criteria. These are a good start to understanding digital preservation storage and may lead us towards a conversation on digital conservation practices When we understand the material nature of the digital world around us and the physical components that make up our digital ecosystem, we can more effectively care for our digital collections through the lens of the conservation field, create policies and assess risks in digital care and handling, and work productively and in partnership with our IT colleagues.

Speakers
avatar for Crystal Sanchez

Crystal Sanchez

Video and Digital Preservation Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, OCIO, DAMS
Crystal Sanchez is a media archivist at the Smithsonian Institution on the Digital Asset Management System (DAMS), working to preserve and provide access to digital collections from across the Smithsonian’s diverse Museums, Archives, Libraries, Research Centers, and the Zoo. She... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Sorensen

Lauren Sorensen

Consulting Archivist and Media Preservation Specialist, Self-Employed
Lauren Sorensen is a self-employed consultant and doctoral student at UCLA in Information Studies. Her research interests include digital preservation, video archives, communities of practice, and fair use. She has held positions at Library of Congress, Bay Area Video Coalition, Canyon... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Texas Ballrooms A-D Marriott Marquis Houston

12:00pm

Opening General Session Discussion Session
Thursday May 31, 2018 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Texas Ballrooms A-D Marriott Marquis Houston

12:30pm

(Private Practice) Getting Results: Tips and Case Study Session for Technical Analysis Resources (Part I)
Limited Capacity seats available

This two-day program will address issues and solutions for obtaining analytical results and material identification for conservators who do not have access to technical equipment or scientific expertise in their studios or laboratories. 

This session will be a selection of tips and case studies presentations of unique solutions to obtaining technical analysis, solutions to interesting problems and tips for  using, and finding services outside of conservation laboratories.

The following panel discussion (Friday, June 1: 12pm to 2pm) will include presentations and discussion on the various models for offering analytical services as well as the pros/cons, ethical and logistical considerations for conducting this kind of research. Speakers will represent various aspects of the process of obtaining analytical services: finding appropriate laboratories, different types of companies/organizations/individuals offering these services, and understanding the issues and limitations of interpreting results. 

The audience is not limited to conservators in private practice, but any individual or organization that does not have these resources.

Preliminary Schedule: (Moderator: Linda Roundhill)

* New Developments with Oddy Testing (Rachael Perkins Arenstein, A.M. Art Conservation, LLC) * Issues with finding regional resources for analysis (Abbott Nixon, West Lake Conservators, Ltd)
* Spectral Analysis for Precise Color Matching (Ulysses Jackson, Golden Artist Colors, Inc.)
* Providing materials testing and analysis for conservators (Lauren Fly, SGS Art Services)
* Using Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)  in private practice (Kerith Koss Schrager, The Found Object Art Conservation)
* Analytical Techniques and Material Identification Tip Flash Session

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Partner, A.M. Art Conservation
Rachael Perkins Arenstein is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation and a Partner in A.M. Art Conservation, LLC the private practice that she co-founded in 2009. For more on A.M. Art Conservation please visit www.amartconservation.com. She has worked... Read More →
avatar for Abbott Nixon

Abbott Nixon

Painting Conservation Assistant & Operations Manager, West Lake Conservators
Abbott received her B.A. in Arts Administration from SUNY Fredonia, where she studied the ephemeral performance art. She received her M.A. in Critical Museum Studies in May 2018, where she focused on the museum management and wrote her Master's thesis on the ethics of material degradation... Read More →
avatar for Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Objects Conservator, The Found Object Art Conservation
Kerith Koss Schrager is an Objects Conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation. She has worked with institutions such as Historic Hudson Valley, Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Freer|Sackler Galleries (Smithsonian Institution), Field Museum, and Shelburne... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Ship and Insure

Ship and Insure

Ship and Insure


Thursday May 31, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Montrose Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

1:15pm

Emerging Conservation Professionals Network (ECPN) Informational Meeting
Come meet the ECPN leadership, hear about our recent and upcoming initiatives, and learn how to get involved! This Informational Meeting will provide an opportunity to meet fellow conference attendees, ask questions about how AIC and ECPN operate, and voice your ideas for building community and resources to support emerging conservation professionals.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Gridley

Rebecca Gridley

Assistant Conservator, Objects Conservation Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Rebecca holds a BA in Art History from Yale University, and an MS in Conservation and MA in Art History & Archaeology from the Conservation Center, The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. She is currently an Assistant Conservator in the Objects Conservation Department at The Metropolitan... Read More →
avatar for Kari Rayner

Kari Rayner

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation, National Gallery of Art
Kari Rayner is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Kari graduated with her Master’s Degree in Art History and Certificate in Art Conservation from New York University in 2015 and interned at the Hamilton Kerr Institute... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Tanglewood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Digging Deep: The Importance of Collaborations between Architectural Conservators and Archeologists
Excavating at an archeological site or probing a building can provide opportunities for architectural conservators and archeologists to work together. We do not collaborate as often as we should. This paper examines several projects where either there was collaboration or it was lacking and demonstrates how these two types of conservators examining materials together extracts a better understanding of what has been found. Building archeology is the study of a building. Despite the word archeology, it is not uncommon for Architectural Conservators to forget the archeologist. Removing floorboards for repairs in the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York City uncovered layers of objects including buttons, bones and tickets hidden in rats’ nests as well as material that had fallen between the floorboards over the course of a hundred and thirty years. Archeologists were a key part of the team retrieving and documenting this material for interpretation. Another type of project that would benefit from more collaboration is cemetery conservation. Often cemetery conservation is limited to repairing, aligning, and resetting markers, ensuring the cemetery looks tidy. But not all cemeteries had neatly placed gravestones surrounded by careful plantings. African American burials were often marked by grave goods or “offerings” placed upon graves. These items could be pottery and shells, as well as everyday objects such as cups, spoons, dolls heads, and clothing. Sandy Ground, a cemetery on the southern tip of Staten Island, was originally the resting place for an early free African American fishing community. It was vandalized in the 1990s. In an effort to restore the cemetery, it was cleaned up and many grave goods that were thought to be trash were lost. Archeologists can also forget that architectural conservators have extensive knowledge of historic building materials. During work on New York City Hall, a brick foundation was uncovered that was thought to be an early eighteenth century foundation. An examination by the architectural conservators found the walls were constructed of pressed brick and the mortar was natural cement, which dated the foundations well into the nineteenth century. On projects where archeologists and architectural conservators have worked together, a greater understanding of the building or site can emerge. An examination of the foundations of Federal Hall in New York City by a team consisting of an architectural conservator and an archeologist quickly dispelled the notion that the foundations were from a seventeenth century structure. An examination of walls discovered in Battery Park during work on the New York City subway system also benefited from a team of archeologists and architectural conservators working together. The excavated walls could not be saved, but the team was able to thoroughly document the techniques and materials used to construct them.

Speakers
avatar for Mary A. C. Jablonski-[Fellow]

Mary A. C. Jablonski-[Fellow]

Architectural Conservator, Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc.
Mary Jablonski is the president and founder of Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc. The firm was started in 1995 and has grown into a consistent award winning architectural conservation firm that prides itself on working with its clients to find easy to execute and easy to maintain... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Book and Paper) Washi: Understanding Japanese paper as a material of culture and conservation
Washi, or Japanese paper, is both a material of cultural heritage and a material used ubiquitously in conservation. Long before it became an amazing conservation material, washi had specific purposes tied to Japanese culture. Japanese papermaking is a historical craft that has experienced significant changes in the past few decades. Sadly, not all changes are for the better—the number of papermakers is dwindling and certain types of washi have become extinct due to closure of papermaking mills responding to various pressures. The accelerated changes in the world of washi compounded by potential language barriers for conservators who are not fluent in Japanese make it difficult for conservators to be certain of how these changes might be affecting washi used for treatment.  Seminal research has been conducted in the past about Japanese papermaking materials and techniques as well as technical analysis of handmade and machine made washi to determine its most appropriate use in conservation. However, these references may not be current enough for conservators to assess papers made in modern times.
 
By maintaining a current understanding of the history and process of Japanese papers we are respecting washi as both an object of cultural importance and as a conservation material that we use so commonly. This presentation seeks to review the history and technical process of Japanese papermaking. It will look at the methods and techniques of the papermakers represented by Hiromi Paper Inc., as well as some of the toolmakers, and raw materials involved in the papermaking process. Related conservation research published to date will be covered, and methods of extracting information through visual examination of washi for practical applications in conservation will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Brook Prestowitz

Brook Prestowitz

Assistant Paper Conservator, Williamstown Art Conservation Center
Brook Prestowitz is the Assistant Conservator of Paper at the Williamstown Art Conservation Center in Williamstown, MA. She earned an MA in Conservation of Fine Art, Works of Art on Paper, from Northumbria University in 2015. Prior to her current position in Williamstown, she was... Read More →

Co-Authors
YK

Yuki Katayama

Director, Hiromi Paper Inc.
Yuki works for the California based Hiromi Paper Inc., the primary US importer of fine art Japanese papers for art and conservation. Their papers are used by notable artists, craftsmen, and conservators throughout the US. She helps to supply quality papers and other related materials... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Electronic Media) Rewind, Pause, Playback: Addressing a Media Conservation Backlog at the Denver Art Museum
While the field of electronic media conservation continues to grow in sophistication, museum acquisitions of electronic media artworks have historically outpaced the development of the field and museum professionals’ understanding of the fragility of analog audiovisual materials, software-based artworks, media installation, and other forms of electronic media art. As awareness of electronic media preservation has spread, a need to address the backlog of works already in museum collections has also come into focus. Over the course of the past seven years, the Denver Art Museum (DAM) has worked to establish institutional practice and policy directed at preserving the electronic media in the museum's collection and to deepen institutional knowledge of the complexities associated with this “new” form. However, the DAM began collecting and exhibiting electronic media artwork far before this institutional priority was in place. While developing museum-wide processes for the exhibition and preservation of new acquisitions, the museum has also taken steps to safeguard the electronic media already in the collection. The effort aimed at addressing the backlog of pressing preservation actions necessary to ensure the sustainability of these electronic media works has resulted in two survey-based projects. In 2015, a pilot project, to survey 70 electronic media objects from the AIGA Design Collection of the AD&G Department, resulted in an initial framework for preserving born-digital content. Building on the success of this survey, a broader electronic media conservation project, funded by the IMLS, began in December of 2016, and will continue through September of 2018. The goals of the DAM’s ongoing grant-funded conservation project affect every media artwork in the collection. Any material from the museum’s collection which had previously been stored on videotapes, optical discs, and external hard drives will be migrated to the museum’s digital repository, and cataloged in the museum's collection management system. In the process of performing these tasks, video playback equipment, digital storage, and physical storage needs for the institution have been assessed and improved. Much of electronic media conservation literature emphasizes the significance of a particular work’s history, promoting an approach of compiling “significant properties” through research, in order to determine the work’s “identity” and basing any treatments on this knowledge. This current project addresses the highest risk factors of the DAM’s backlog of materials in an efficient and timely manner. Therefore, the “survey style” of this project does not include complete scrutiny of each object before taking certain actions. This presentation will examine the benefits of the DAM’s approach, while also acknowledging the constraints of this pragmatic methodology.

Speakers
avatar for Eddy Colloton

Eddy Colloton

Assistant Conservator, Denver Art Museum
Eddy Colloton is currently an Assistant Conservator for the Denver Art Museum as part of an IMLS funded project to preserve the electronic media in the DAM's collection. In May of 2016, he received his MA degree from the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program at New York... Read More →
avatar for Kate Moomaw-[PA]

Kate Moomaw-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Denver Art Museum
Kate Moomaw is Associate Conservator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Denver Art Museum, in Denver, Colorado, where she has focused since 2011 on the conservation of modern and contemporary objects, variable media, and outdoor sculpture. She trained in the conservation of objects... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Objects) Manipulating Materials: Preparing and Using Paraloid B-72 Adhesive Mixtures
Recent AIC presentations (2017 Annual Meeting) indicate that there are numerous misunderstandings about the use of solvent adhesives, particularly Paraloid B-72. The increasingly popular use of Paraloid B-72 is based primarily on its notable and favorable conservation attributes. Paraloid B-72 is the most stable, reversible and dependable resin now used in conservation. It was introduced as an adhesive by the author just over 30 years ago and also has very commendable working properties, including excellent adhesion and fast setting time, but these can easily be compromised by improper preparation and improper application. This paper discusses the many ways that Paraloid B-72, or other solvent-based adhesives should be prepared, modified or manipulated to obtain easy and efficient application as well as consistent and excellent results. Preparation is critical to having a dependable solvent-based adhesive. B-72 can be very easily made up with only a few minutes of preparation, and then allowing about 8 hours for the resin to dissolve in solvent. The choice of solvent is very important, and acetone has proven to be the best solvent, on its own, or in some cases with a small amount (5-10%) of ethanol. The ratio or percentage of resin:solvent can be modified to control the application and setting time for different uses. This then allows the conservator to control the application of a thin or thicker adhesive. One additive is recommended in the initial preparation, and that is the addition of a small amount of hydrophobic fumed colloidal silica, which aids in uniform application, stabilization of the mixture, film formation and solvent evaporation. Fumed silica is an inert material, classified as a rheological agent (to control flow characteristics). It is not necessary to evaporate off any solvent after the B-72 resin has dissolved in the acetone, as the initial amount of solvent can easily be calculated for producing an adhesive of specific viscosity (or thickness). For glass, a thinner solution of approximately 60 % weight/volume is recommended because glass is non-porous and non-permeable, while a thicker solution of 72 % works better on more porous substrates, such as low-fired ceramics, porous stone, wood, bone and ivory. For best results, including application and maintaining a consistent fluid mixture, the prepared adhesive should be poured into adhesive tubes, specifically designed for solvent adhesives. This also improves the ease-of-use and accuracy of assembly.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Stephen Koob-[Fellow]

Chief Conservator, Corning Museum of Glass
Stephen Koob is responsible for the care and preservation of all of the Museum’s collections. This includes cleaning the glass and making recommendations for its handling, storage, display, and movement. He also oversees the maintenance and repair of objects in the Museum’s... Read More →



Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Paintings) Surprise Encounters with Mummy Portraits at the Art Institute of Chicago
The Art Institute of Chicago houses two second-century Roman-era Egyptian mummy portraits in its collection. In recent years mummy portraits have been the focus of considerable study, and the Art Institute’s examples have been examined using multiple analytical techniques in an effort to elucidate the methods and materials used in their creation. During the course of these investigations, intriguing differences between the two portraits were noted. With regard to the binding medium, one of the portraits bears the hallmark robust impasto of wax applied using the encaustic technique, and the other displays the flatter, matte appearance accompanied by the striking tratteggio and crosshatching that is often associated with tempera painting. Indeed, prior to technical examination the two paintings were perceived as such. Analysis of the binding medium of the first portrait using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) demonstrated, unsurprisingly, that it is composed of wax, supporting a description of the technique as encaustic. However, analysis of the second portrait unexpectedly also revealed the presence of wax. A limited number of published studies of media analyses of other portraits which yielded the same dichotomous results—assumed to be egg or glue based on visual appearance but found to be wax upon technical investigation—has confirmed the existence of similar objects in other collections. The Chicago painting is, consequently, one of a growing corpus of portraits that thrusts a tint of grey into an art historical construct that has been presented as quite black and white. Additionally, both portraits were examined with a combination of non-invasive in-situ scanning X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and near infrared luminescence imaging (visible induced luminescence spectroscopy, VILS). The presence of cuprorivaite, or ‘Egyptian blue’, was detected on both portraits, but its character and distribution varied startlingly between them. This discovery raises numerous questions as to the artists’ working methods, material choices, and the transmission of techniques between the Fayum region and the wider Graeco-Roman world. The analyses of the Chicago portraits, alongside collaborative work with other institutions housing similar portraits, adds to the body of information that will hopefully, ultimately address such questions. But it also serves as useful reminder that works of art often resist clear categorization since they are, after all, human creations and thus subject to the individualities and idiosyncrasies of their makers.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Rachel C. Sabino-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects, Art Institute of Chicago
RACHEL C. SABINO has been Associate Conservator of Objects at the Art Institute of Chicago since 2011 where, in addition to treatment-related activities, she has been a co-author of the museum's online scholarly catalogue of Roman art. Rachel held previous positions at the National... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Emeline Pouyet

Emeline Pouyet

Post doctoral fellow, Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago
Emeline Pouyet is a post-doctoral fellow at the NU-ACCESS center (Chicago, U.S.A). She received her M.S. degree in Archaeometry in 2010 and completed her Ph.D. studies in 2014 at the ID21 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). Her activities focused... Read More →
avatar for Federica Pozzi

Federica Pozzi

Associate Research Scientist, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Federica Pozzi, Associate Research Scientist at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, leads the Network Initiative for Conservation Science (NICS), a pilot program aiming to support New York–area museums that do not have access to a state-of-the-art scientific research facility. Federica... Read More →
KS

Ken Sutherland

Conservation Scientist, Art Institute of Chicago
Ken Sutherland is a scientist in the Department of Conservation and Science at the Art Institute of Chicago. He held previous positions as scientist in the Conservation Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Research Fellow in the Scientific Research Department of the National... Read More →
avatar for Marc Sebastian Walton

Marc Sebastian Walton

Co-Director, Research Professor, Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts
Marc Walton joined the Northwestern University / Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts in 2013 as its inaugural Senior Scientist and as a Research Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. In January of 2018, he was appointed... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Comparison of LED, L-37 Filtered Xenon Arc, and Glass-Filtered Cool White Fluorescent Illumination in the Light Fading and Light-Induced Staining of Color Photographs
During the past several years, there has been a large-scale shift from UV-filtered tungsten halogen illumination to high Color Rendering Index (CRI) LED illumination in museums, galleries, archives, and libraries, along with widespread adoption of generally lower CRI lamps in public buildings, commercial establishments, and homes. The majority of light stability information on the indoor fading and staining of analog and digitally-printed color photographs published in the past 30 years has been based on accelerated tests conducted with glass-filtered and UV-filtered Cool White fluorescent illumination. At the present time, for a number of important reasons, Wilhelm Imaging Research, HP, Epson, and Kodak Alaris, among others, continue to conduct accelerated light fading tests using this illumination source.  However, "ISO International Standard 18937:2014, Imaging materials – Photographic reflection prints – Methods for measuring indoor light stability," specifies L-37 filtered xenon arc illumination for “simulated display in indoor indirect daylight through window glass.” JEITA Standard CP3901A also specifies L-37 filtered xenon arc illumination. Work is currently in progress on "ISO 18937-4, Imaging materials – Photographic reflection prints – Methods for measuring indoor light stability – Part 4: LED Illumination." Working together with Shigeo Suga of Suga Test Instruments of Tokyo, Japan, Henry Wilhelm is serving as Co-Project Leader in the development of this new ISO standard. Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. has designed and constructed new temperature and humidity-controlled accelerated light stability test equipment for LED lamps. This paper will present comparative fading and staining data for a representative group of color photographic print materials, including silver-halide color (chromogenic) prints made with Kodak Alaris Endura Premier Professional Paper and Fujicolor Crystal Archive PDN Professional Paper (also to be discussed is the newly-developed "Improved Light-Stability" Fujicolor Crystal Archive Professional Paper that was publicly announced at the IS&T Digital Printing Technologies Conference in Denver, Colorado on November 8, 2017, and will be commercially introduced in September 2018 at the Photokina trade show in Cologne, Germany); Epson UltraChrome HDR pigment inkjet prints; Epson EcoTank (Epson 664 dye inks) dye inkjet prints; ChromaLuxe dye-sublimation photographs printed on an intermediate transfer paper with Epson UltraChrome DS (dye sublimation) inks and then thermally transferred under high heat at 190–205°C (375–400°F) and pressure (60–80 PSI) for 2–4 minutes onto a rigid, specially coated ChromaLuxe aluminum support; and ChromaLuxe dye-sublimation photographs printed in the same manner with Sawgrass 8-color Sublijet HD Pro Photo XF dye-sublimation inks. The prints have been subjected to accelerated tests using high-intensity 25 klux LED illumination from SORAA Vivid PAR 38 violet (purple) pump emitter LED lamps with a CRI of 95 and CCT of 3000K (1000 lumen output, 60°FL, 18.5-watt SORAA SP38-18-60D-930-03) with glass-filtered, UV-filtered, and non-filtered (bare-bulb) exposure conditions.  For comparison purposes, prints have been exposed to illumination from single-phosphor OSRAM Sylvania High Output (HO) 4200K Cool White (JIS F-6) fluorescent lamps (made in Canada) with glass-filtered, UV-filtered, and non-filtered bare-bulb exposure conditions.  In addition, in ongoing tests, prints have been exposed to xenon arc illumination (equipped with water-cooled Hoya L-37 glass filters and dual IR filters) in a Suga SX75F temperature- and humidity-controlled xenon arc test unit equipped with dual refrigerated chamber air and water-jacketed xenon lamp cooling systems that simulate indoor indirect daylight through window glass, both with and without a UV filter.  Illumination levels, sample surface temperature, test chamber temperature, and relative humidity conditions have been maintained as close as possible to the same aim-points. Identical methods of test target measurement and analysis for reporting fading and staining data are employed. Tungsten-halogen and L-37 filtered xenon illumination, however, present a number of difficult technical issues in terms of maintaining uniform sample surface temperatures, moisture levels, uniform illumination levels, and mitigating other factors that can result in poor inter-laboratory agreement between different testing organizations, and this will be discussed in the presentation.  The spectral power distributions in the UV, Visible, and IR regions for all of the illumination sources will be given, including the spectral properties of LED lamps based on blue pump emitters and LED lamps based on violet (purple) pump emitters.  Related topics that will briefly be discussed include:  Lux (a measure of light intensity as perceived by the human eye – and its generally not straightforward relationship to rates of fading and light-induced staining), Color Rendering Index (CIE CRI), IES TM-30-15, Television Lighting Consistency Index (TLCI), Color Quality Scale (CQS), and Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) for LED lamps will be described.  Potential differences between blue pump emitter LED illumination and violet (purple) pump emitter LED illumination in terms of their potential impacts on the fading rates of color photographs – and, likely, paintings, watercolors, other works of art, fabrics, books, and historically important documents – will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Henry Wilhelm

Henry Wilhelm

Director of Research, Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc.
Henry Wilhelm is Director of Research at Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. in Grinnell, Iowa, USA. Wilhelm has authored or co-authored more than 30 technical papers presented at conferences sponsored by the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T), the Imaging Society of Japan... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Richard Adams

Richard Adams

Associate Professor, School of Graphic Communications Management, Ryerson University
Richard M. Adams II, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the School of Graphic Communications Management at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. He teaches courses in document design, web design, and material science for print. His research interests include color management, electronic... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) Fiber and Yarn Cross-section Sample Preparation Methods for Effective Plant Fiber Material Characterization and Identification
Fiber cross-section observation is often essential when characterizing and identifying plant fiber artifacts. A number of bast fibers and leaf fibers have very similar morphologies in the longitudinal direction but they differ more distinctively from each other in cross-section features. Most of the existing methods of fiber or yarn cross-section sample preparation, for either light or scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations, are not designed for handling fragile archaeological materials. The aim of this research project was to identify and develop effective fiber or yarn cross-section preparation methods which can be used for studying fragile archaeological textile objects. This study compared three fiber or yarn cross-section sample preparation methods for SEM observation including epoxy embedding, modified plastic fiber cross-section plate and free-hand as well as another three methods for light microscopic (LM) observation, including epoxy embedding and ultra-thin cross-sectioning, free-hand sectioning of embedded fiber or yarn sample and Precision Cross-section Microtome. All these methods were applied to the same archaeological textile remains retrieved from an early 16th century shipwreck site. Several known fiber or fiber plant samples were also studied for reference purposes, including hemp, jute, sisal, abaca, stinging nettle and flax. The SEM results showed that the adoption of a plastic cross-section plate designed for LM usage was the most effective fiber or yarn cross-section preparation method. The plate is cheap and easy to use. Either fiber or yarn samples can be placed into the 1-2 mm holes within the plastic plate using a known synthetic fiber as buffer or protection around the archaeological fiber sample. As to the three methods for LM observation, the most efficient method was free-hand sectioning of fiber or yarn embedded in common slide preparation solution. When dealing with very fragile sample, however, the best method was epoxy resin embedding and ultra-thin cross-sectioning (1 micrometer). This method minimizes sample distortion and keeps the sample intact. However, a phase contrast microscope is needed for observing and imaging the obtained ultra-thin cross-section samples. Based on all the cross-section images obtained from both archaeological textile samples and reference fibers or fiber plant samples, we recommend using yarns to prepare cross-section sample for either SEM or LM observation when possible. The cross-section of yarns could provide not only fiber information but also other plant tissue cell characteristics. The later can be critical when identifying a specific fiber plant. When studying very fragile archaeological textile material, we recommend the method of epoxy embedding and ultra-thin sectioning, although this method is most time consuming. The other two methods using plastic fiber cross-section plate for SEM observation and free-hand sectioning of embedded sample for LM observation are quick, easy, effective and applicable to most of textile materials. Finally, the results of this project demonstrated again that fiber cross-section study is essential when identifying and characterizing archaeological plant fiber artifacts.

Speakers
avatar for Runying Chen

Runying Chen

Associate Professor, East Carolina University
RUNYING CHEN, Associate Professor. Dr. Chen received her Ph.D. in Human Ecology, majoring in textile science with concentration in analytical chemistry, in 1998 from the Ohio State University. She has been teaching at the Department of Interior Design and Merchandising of East Carolina... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Tom Fink

Tom Fink

Biology Department Imaging Laboratory Manager, East Carolina University
Tom Fink received his PhD from Florida State University. He manages Biology Department Imaging Laboratory, conducts and assists research projects using the laboratory facilities. Dr. Fink also teaches biology imaging courses for both undergraduate and graduate students at East Carolina... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Wooden Artifacts) Inside the Frames of Stanford White: A Technical Study
Stanford White (1853-1906) is well-known as an architect at the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White in New York, where he was a partner from 1879 until his unexpected death in 1906. Although he was best known for his architectural work and interior designs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art holds over a dozen picture frames that were designed by White. A technical study of Stanford White frames in the Metropolitan’s collection was carried out by the author as part of an Annette de la Renta Junior Fellowship in the Department of Paintings Conservation. Seven frames, designed between 1889 and 1900, were examined using various analytical techniques, to complement existing studies which focus mainly on stylistic elements and on White’s professional relationships and collaborations. Just as his interior designs, White’s frame designs can be placed in the context of the late nineteenth-century Aesthetic Movement, which included an array of styles, resulting in highly artistic and aestheticized designs with a great variety of decorative elements. The frames were designed for specific paintings that were painted by White’s contemporaries, many of whom were his personal friends. White held close tabs on his frame designs, whether unique frames matching specific paintings or standard designs. Neither client nor frame maker was allowed to execute his frame or ornament designs without his permission. After his death the standard designs, documented with photographs, molds and samples, continued to be fabricated. Copies of his frames were made as well. His elaborate frame designs with distinctive, often architectural ornaments, are fascinating works of art that had not been extensively studied technically. This paper will present the results of the technical study. It will discuss observations about manufacturing processes, such as the use of joints associated with cabinetry and the use of copper wire in cast ornaments. Moreover, it will address the originality of the surfaces, such as the direct application of gilding on a wooden substrate, without a gesso preparation. The technical results are complemented with findings from archival research at the Avery Architecture and Fine Arts Library (Columbia University), which holds correspondence on numerous of White’s projects. The interdisciplinary approach of technical and archival research is especially valuable whenever material aspects of the original frames are lost, covered or altered. This study has provided valuable insights in American frame making towards the end of the nineteenth century. As an architect and designer in America’s Gilded Age, Stanford White elevated frame making to a form of art. Examining the technical aspects of White’s frame designs also adds to the growing appreciation of frames as art objects in their own right.

Speakers
avatar for Tess Graafland

Tess Graafland

Junior Conservator of Frames and Gilding, Rijksmuseum
Tess Graafland graduated from the University of Amsterdam with a Master degree and Professional Doctorate in Conservation and Restoration of Wood and Furniture in 2014. She took internships at both the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, in furniture... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Collection Care) Stash Flash V – Storage Tips Session
The STASHc (Storage Techniques for Art, Science and History collections) website www.stashc.com, hosted by FAIC is now five years old and continues to expand as a resource for sharing well-designed storage solutions.  To complement AIC’s 46th Annual Meeting conference theme, the 2018 STASH Flash session will focus on the interplay between the material composition of artifacts and the materials chosen for the construction of storage and support solutions. The session will utilize a lightening round or “tips” format and the full presentations will be posted on the STASHc website following the conference.  After the presentations there will be an update on the Collection Care Network’s new Materials Working Group and we will engage participants in discussion about their hopes and needs for an online resource that will aid in making suitable materials choices for storage, exhibit and transport.
 
Download a complete listing of talks with abstracts below.

Moderators
avatar for Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Rachael Perkins Arenstein-[PA]

Partner, A.M. Art Conservation
Rachael Perkins Arenstein is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation and a Partner in A.M. Art Conservation, LLC the private practice that she co-founded in 2009. For more on A.M. Art Conservation please visit www.amartconservation.com. She has worked... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Goldberg-[Fellow]

Lisa Goldberg-[Fellow]

AIC News Editor, Private Conservator
Project leader for STASH, AIC News Editor and conservator in private practice. Lisa Goldberg is a private conservator with a focus on preventive care as well as health and safety issues. She is a member of SPNHC and AAM, and is a Professional Associate of AIC. As long time editor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dorothy Cheng

Dorothy Cheng

Lunder Fellow in Objects Conservation, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Dorothy Cheng is the 2017-18 Lunder Fellow in Objects Conservation. She is currently conducting a technical study of casting and patination methods used for the bronze sculptures of Paul Manship. Her interest in metal objects and sculpture began with a B.F.A. in metalsmithing and... Read More →
avatar for Isaac Facio

Isaac Facio

Assistant Conservator, Preparation and Mounting, Textiles, Art Institute of Chicago
avatar for Alison R. Reppert Gerber

Alison R. Reppert Gerber

Preservation Coordinator, Smithsonian Institution Archives
avatar for Sarah Gordon

Sarah Gordon

Conservation Technician, Textiles, Art Institute of Chicago
Sarah Gordon is the Conservation Technician in the textile conservation lab at the Art Institute of Chicago. In charge of preparation and collections care, she holds a strong interest in preventive conservation, particularly in integrated pest management. She graduated with a Bachelor... Read More →
avatar for Marieka Kaye-[PA]

Marieka Kaye-[PA]

Head, Conservation & Book Repair, University of Michigan Library
Marieka currently holds the position of Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation Head, Conservation & Book Repair at the University of Michigan Library. She has worked at U-M since 2013, after serving as a book and paper conservator for 8 years at the Huntington Library in San... Read More →
avatar for Morgan Nau

Morgan Nau

Associate Conservator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
Morgan Nau is the Associate Conservator at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University. She most recently held the position of Associate Conservator of Objects at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Before that, she spent time at The Field Museum where she prepared... Read More →
avatar for James S. Thurn

James S. Thurn

Preservation Specialist, Library of Congress
Jim Thurn is a book and paper conservator by profession. He attended the University of Texas at Austin, at the former Kilgarlin Center for Preservation of the Cultural Record, where I earned a Master of Science in Information Studies with a Certificate of Advanced Study in Conservation... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Loves Me like a Rock: Care and Preservation of Ancient Graffiti in a Rock-Cut Kushite Temple
This talk describes the preservation of ancient graffiti in a rock-cut temple at the site of El Kurru in Sudan. El Kurru is the location of a royal burial ground of ancient Kush (a region located in modern-day northern Sudan), and the site encompasses multiple pyramid burials as well as two rock-cut funerary temples. The sandstone temple that is the focus of this project was built during the late Napatan period (ca. 350 BC), and its walls and columns are heavily inscribed with devotional graffiti from the Meroitic period (ca. 100 BC – AD 100). It is an impressive and unique structure, a source of pride for local residents, and an interesting and accessible feature for visitors. The ancient graffiti it contains provide a unique glimpse into the lives of individuals in antiquity, providing information about their thoughts, values, and daily lives. El Kurru’s sandstone monuments suffer from granular disintegration and other serious condition problems. Although the conservation of archaeological heritage is often complicated, it is especially challenging in Sudan due to a fragile national economy and comprehensive intertnational sanctions against the country (except - these were just lifted in October 2017! - so it might get better!). For these reasons, a holistic approach has been used to preserve the graffiti. Work began with a criterion-anchored rating (CAR) condition survey designed to identify, prioritize, and monitor condition issues. Chemical analysis of the stone was conducted, and treatment options including alkoxysilane consolidation and grout injection were explored. Preventive conservation strategies for the temple, including a protective shelter and increased community education, have also been developed. Finally, reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) was used to document the graffiti’s condition and create a virtual, visual catalog. This talk emphasizes key principles for guiding conservation at archaeological sites: practicality, flexibility, sustainability, and placing a high value on the contributions and wishes of stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Suzanne Davis-[Fellow]

Suzanne Davis-[Fellow]

Curator and Head of Conservation, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan
Suzanne Davis is an associate curator and the head of conservation at the University of Michigan's Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Prior to joining the Museum in 2001, she was a conservator for the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval Historical Center in Washington, D.C. She... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Janelle Batkin-Hall

Janelle Batkin-Hall

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation, National Museum of African Art
Janelle Batkin-Hall is a Mellon Fellow in objects conservation at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art. She is a graduate of the Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State College, SUNY. Her research interests include technical imaging, microscopy, and the conservation... Read More →
avatar for Carrie Roberts-[PA]

Carrie Roberts-[PA]

Conservator, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
Caroline Roberts is a conservator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology at the University of Michigan. She is a graduate of the Winterthur / University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, and is a professional associate of the AIC. Her interests include the conservation and preservation... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Book and Paper) Optical Clearing of Repair Tissues for the Treatment of Translucent Papers
There are many types of translucent papers, each with its own set of conservation issues stemming from various manufacturing processes. The characteristic that makes them stand apart from other papers—transparency—can itself be at risk when there is a need for applying mending or lining tissues. This project explores the physical aspects of paper transparency, and investigates the concept of optical clearing (transparentizing) of repair tissues, with the goal of achieving appropriate repairs on translucent papers without dramatically increasing the opacity of treated areas. The term “optical clearing” is borrowed from the fields of biology and medical research; it refers to the process of rendering biological tissues transparent through the application of clearing agents, which minimize the scattering of light and allow greater visibility for microscopy and imaging. This is similar to some historical processes of transparentizing paper, in which oils, waxes and rosins were added to fill light-scattering interstices, allowing more light to travel unimpeded through the paper web. This concept is applied to conservation repair tissues, with the goal of determining a coating to serve dual functions: optical clearing agent and reactivatable adhesive.

A wide range of adhesives and coatings familiar to paper conservation was tested for their transparentizing effects on a variety of repair tissues, including more traditional Japanese papers and the recently developed nanocellulose papers. Opacity measurements were taken using a spectrophotometer and the contrast-ratio method. Acrylic polymer dispersions proved to be the most consistently successful clearing agents. The most substantial transparentizing effects occurred in gampi-fiber Japanese tissues, with some cleared by over 90% of their original opacity. This can be attributed to the superior film-formation qualities of the acrylic dispersions and their amorphous polymeric structure. The heat-reactivation capability of acrylic adhesives also proves advantageous for the treatment of translucent tissues, which tend to react dramatically to moisture.

A range of repair methods was applied to modern translucent tissue samples. These were measured for opacity before and after treatment to compare to repairs made with cleared tissues. SEM cross-sectional imaging was used to visualize adhesive penetration. Attempts at removing each repair were also made to characterize ease-of-reversibility. The long-term stability of optically cleared repair tissues is considered alongside an aging test that measures the yellowing and turbidity of acrylic transparentizing coatings under different light exposures.

The application of the optically cleared tissues is discussed via the treatment of two large objects possessing damaged transparent overlays: Atlas Photographique de la Lune (Observatoire de Paris, 1896–1910) and Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Wasmuth Portfolio” (1910). The suitability of different clearing agents in varying contexts is also considered, such as in the treatment of coated transparent papers.

Speakers
avatar for Roger S. Williams

Roger S. Williams

Conservation Fellow, Northwestern University Library
Roger Williams is the current conservation fellow at Northwestern University Libraries. He earned his MA in Conservation Studies (Books & Library Materials) from West Dean College and the University of Sussex in 2015. He worked previously at the Rare Book School at the University... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Electronic Media) Archiving Computer-based Artworks
Art museums throughout the world have been acquiring computer-based artworks with increasing confidence. As artist-created hardware and software enters museum collections, it presents unique challenges for long-term preservation. Conservation staff at these institutions face urgent questions about appropriate materials to collect related to these works and how to define their technical, functional, and conceptual constituents.

The Guggenheim acquired its first computer-based artwork in 1989, Jenny Holzer’s Untitled, a colossal LED sign installed in the museum’s rotunda. Since that time, the collection has expanded to include examples of artist-created websites, custom-made microcontroller units, artist-modified computers, and installations involving video games. As a part of the museum’s initiative to “Conserve Computer-based Art” (CCBA) in its collection, this paper takes a critical look at the physical and digital elements that museums retain or generate in order to archive and preserve their computer-based artworks.

Drawing from the Guggenheim’s own CCBA collection survey and back-up project, which encompasses artworks from a range of ages and employing a variety of technologies, the paper provides an overview of collected digital assets and documentation, investigates crucial archival elements that are missing in hindsight, and proposes elements that museums should consider obtaining or creating now in order to sustain the collection life of their software- and computer-based artworks.

The paper will devote particular attention to: disk imaging of artist-provided computers, web servers, and removable media (such as floppy disks and CDs); measures that can be taken to enable future access to these disk images; capturing metadata about the hardware and software that an artwork depends upon to function; exploring instances where obtaining source code alone proves insufficient to sustain the life of an artwork; and the importance of technical and descriptive metadata for future migration or emulation of a work. Where relevant, the research draws from the knowledge and experience of the allied fields of computer science, library science, archival studies, and digital preservation. The paper highlights how understanding the practices of these fields as well as engaging in interdisciplinary collaboration becomes essential for conservators to fulfill their mandate as stewards of computer-based art.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Farbowitz

Jonathan Farbowitz

Fellow in the Conservation of Computer-based Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Jonathan Farbowitz, the Guggenheim's Fellow in the Conservation of Computer-based Art, assists the Conservation department in addressing the preservation needs of computer-based works in the Guggenheim’s collection. He also supports the development of best practices for collecting... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Objects) Visible effects of adhesive and pressure on color in kingfisher feathers
Structurally colored feathers render color through physical scattering of light rather than pigments. There is an expected, but heretofore unexplored, effect of adhesive choice and pressure on the color of these materials. Further, such feathers are generally considered to be more light-stable than pigmented examples. In the current study, structurally colored blue kingfisher feathers are used to examine these effects in order to guide conservation treatments and preventive care.

The Chinese tradition of tian-tsui, literally 'dotting with kingfishers', describes a technique of cloisonné style jewelry that utilizes blue, blue-green, and purple feathers instead of fused glass powder. The feathers are adhered to a backing, usually metallic, though occasionally composed of thick layers of paper. This technique appears in Chinese culture from as early as the first century BCE, though surviving examples date most prevalently to the Qing dynasty (19th century) (Chambers et al. 1981, 32). The early featherwork items were not restricted to jewelry, but also appeared in the form of feather mosaics on clothing, bed coverings, and palanquins (Chambers et al. 1981, 32; Garrett 1994, 86). Such items are now ubiquitous in museum collections. Through a technical study of kingfisher feather jewelry from the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College in Claremont California, as well as accelerated light aging studies and pressure tests completed on mocked up samples of recently plucked kingfisher feathers at both the UCLA/Getty and the Getty Conservation Institute labs, I evaluate the effects of original and conservation/restoration adhesives and coatings, and effects of mechanical interactions, on the structural colors of the feathers.

For the experimental part of the study, feather specimens from skins of Halcyon smyrnensis, the White-breasted Kingfisher, donated by the United States Fish and Wildlife Department, were plucked, trimmed, and adhered onto inert quartz glass plates and subjected to three methods of light aging, with color measurements occurring after aging with an integrating sphere. The accelerated light aging methods included museum conditions (free of ultraviolet radiation), window conditions (ultraviolet radiation present), and high intensity UVA conditions, with an additional control group kept in the dark. Adhesive systems tested were those documented as having been used originally or in the conservation of kingfisher featherwork, including: protein glues (gelatin and isinglass), funori, methylcellulose, and Paraloid B-72. Characterizing the adhesives used on the Scripps collection items provided supporting technical evidence.

Taken together, the results of this study provide insights into kingfisher feather tian-tsui technology, and the effect of adhesive systems and mechanical actions on the preservation of color within these structurally colored feathers. Findings will be presented about the color stability, both separately and upon interaction with different adhesives, leading to recommendations for adhesive choices for the conservation of such featherwork. Further, results of mechanical disruption of kingfisher feather coloration will be illustrated. Experimental work and technical analysis provide an enhanced understanding of a complex material, effectively aiding its conservation and preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Paintings) A Convenient Method: Canvas Painting in 16th Century Florence
In 16th century Italy, the use of canvas as a support for paintings was more closely associated with Venice than with Florence, yet Florentine painters utilized canvas for certain projects. It has been noted that this usually indicates that these paintings were created for specific purposes such as banners. However, these functions are not always so obvious, and this major clue to the origin of a work can go ignored. This study explores the reasons for using canvas by looking at the works themselves as well as contemporary writings including Vasari on Technique. Vasari, proudly grounded in the Tuscan tradition of panel painting, had a definite respect for the utility of canvas; he writes that it is a “convenient” support, a word which for him had ethical as well as practical connotations. Such research can help re-contextualize works especially those that were not originally conceived as independent paintings. By looking at materials and techniques, as well as evidence of damage and alteration, a painting has recently been identified as part of a temporary decoration (apparato) created for the Medici wedding of 1565; that case study is the core of this paper. At the time, such decorations were extremely important, created by the leading artists of the day, including Pontormo, Bronzino and Alessandro Allori. Designed as ephemera, few have survived, and they are almost forgotten as an art form. Canvas was “convenient” for these decorations not only because – as is often mentioned – it was cheaper, lighter and could be made quite large – but also because it could easily and thriftily be made to an exact, predetermined size so as to fit in an architectural framework that was itself the ancestor of the modern theater set. Using very simple examination techniques - measuring canvas widths, looking at seaming and scalloping as well as ground types and thicknesses and the range of pigments used – a great deal can be understood about this early modern installation art as well as other uses of canvas by artists for whom it was a specific choice. The advantages they found would then inform the more common use of canvas in later centuries.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Dommermuth-[Fellow]

Jean Dommermuth-[Fellow]

Senior Conservator, ArtCare Conservation, A Rustin Levenson Company
BA in Art History and MBA, University of Illinois; MA in Art History and Diploma in Art Conservation, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. After earning her graduate degree in conservation, Jean completed a two year internship focusing on the treatment of old master paintings... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Photographic Materials) Evaluation of Hydrolytic Accelerated Aging Protocols on Cellulose Acetate
A collaborative research project between the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) and the Walt Disney Animation Research Library (ARL) is investigating the effects of storage environment on stability of animation cels. One aspect includes an evaluation of accelerated aging methods to create aged mockups in parallel condition to naturally-aged cels. For cellulose diacetate (CDA) animation cels created between 1940s-1980s, the support material is particularly prone to degradation by hydrolysis and chain scission, while reviewing archival records reveal a variety of storage environments prior to 1996. To date there has yet to be a comprehensive study of CDA reaction kinetics and mechanism of degradation of the problematic art material, nor are there established projections of risk based on specific storage conditions and containment. As part of the evaluation, cellulose triacetate (CTA) and CDA from the Disney ARL collection were compared to thermally-aged set of prepared mock-ups without plasticizers, in order to calculate the rate constant through Arrhenius methods. In some cases CA materials were pre-incubated to ascertain the physical effects of the reaction from within a cel before aging in the CTA industry standard of aluminum/polypropylene (Al/PP) and vapor barrier polyvinyl-fluoride (PVF) heat-sealed bags. This was compared with other cases where CA degradation reaction may be promoted by an environment, by aging within Teflon crimp-lid glass vials with the reactant of water or the catalyst of acid, which is the byproduct of hydrolysis reaction. The depth of penetration of degradation in CA will be assessed by utilizing the rate constant in conjunction with depth-profiling FTIR. Initial results after one month of accelerated aging revealed the Al/PP packaging method resulted in the highest degradation, followed by the glass vials, with the smallest effects seen in the PVF bags. The changes were confirmed by several analytical methods of detecting % acetyl content, including ion chromatography and FTIR. Other key findings of this research indicated plasticizers enhanced the degradation rates in the cels. Moreover, incubation pre-aging enhanced hydrolysis of all these CA plastic films from worst to least: one Molar acetic acid environment, ~85 %RH, and ~55 %RH across all samples analyzed. Initial observations show liquid is trapped between cels when stacked together and aged, but further research will be required to determine the influence of separating each cel in storage. Disney CTA and CDA, and CDA mock-ups aged alongside interleaving, buffered, and box materials aid in assessing the impact of storage materials on CA stability used in the Disney ARL collection. Long term impact of this research is contributing to the understanding of degradation kinetics to assist in predicting CA longevity, as well as providing guidelines for storage conditions and packaging containers.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Carta

Carolyn Carta

Research Lab Assistant, Getty Conservation Institute
Carolyn Carta joined the GCI in 2016 as a research lab assistant to lead scientific studies as part of the GCI's collaborative research project with the Disney Animation Research Library. She graduated in 2011 with a BA in art history, studio art, and chemistry from Trinity College... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Katharina Hoeyng

Katharina Hoeyng

Katharina Höyng
Katharina Hoeyng recently moved to Amsterdam where she works as a freelance conservator. Prior to that Kathariana joined the Getty Conservation Institute from 2015-2018. As part of the Preservation of Plastics project, she researches and evaluates treatment methods for reattaching... Read More →
avatar for Herant Khanjian

Herant Khanjian

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Herant Khanjian received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from California State University, Northridge and has been a member in the Science department of the Getty Conservation Institute since 1988. His research interests involve the detection and identification of organic media... Read More →
avatar for Joy Mazurek

Joy Mazurek

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Joy Mazurek specializes in the identification and characterization of natural and synthetic organic materials by a number of analytical techniques including gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. She also works on the classification of biomarkers produced by... Read More →
avatar for Kristen McCormick

Kristen McCormick

Art Exhibitions and Conservation Manager, Walt Disney Animation Research Library
Kristen McCormick has been at the Walt Disney Company for over a decade and a half where she has been responsible for the safe keeping, care and transport of a broad range of artworks from African Art to Animation. In her current role she oversees the conservation care of the Walt... Read More →
avatar for Michael R. Schilling

Michael R. Schilling

Senior Scientist, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Michael Schilling is head of Materials Characterization research at the Getty Conservation Institute, which focuses on development of analytical methods for studying classes of materials used by artists and conservators. He specializes in gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) Untangling Indian Hemp: Understanding and Identifying Common Plant Fibers Used by Native Americans in the Woodlands Region
Bast fibers from North American plant species make up a significant portion of textiles produced by Woodlands cultures. These fibers, which are derived from the inner stems of certain plant species, are a traditional and important to many nations in the Northeast and Great Lakes region, yet have received little attention from Western-focused academia. Much of the literature and fiber identification is unclear, incorrect, or based on a Western perspective. Fibers are frequently referred to as “Indian Hemp,” which aside from being an inherently problematic term, has several meanings. This research aims to collaborate with Indigenous community members to identify traditional fiber producing plants and how they utilized to produce textiles. Three Native American experts in fiber preparation were invited to the National Museum of the American Indian Cultural Resource Center to share and discuss harvesting, processing and weaving, as well as the cultural and material significance of these fibers. As an outcome, a handling collection of physical samples as well as polarized light and scanning electron micrographs will be created to aid in understanding of both the macro and micro properties of these materials. The reference collections and appropriate associated cultural information are available to conservators, curators, and Native and non-Native researchers to improve accuracy of fiber identification, enhance material understanding, and reinforce cultural knowledge. Images will also be made available on online for wider access. By understanding both the physical and cultural context of materials, conservators can make more appropriate decisions about the care of our collections. Allowing indigenous voices to be the authority on their own cultural heritage not only begins the decolonization process of museums, but enriches the institution as well.

Speakers
avatar for Nora Frankel

Nora Frankel

Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation, National Museum of the American Indian
Nora Frankel is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Past work includes positions at the Rijksmuseum, Burrell Collection, Death Valley National Park, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, and... Read More →

Co-Authors
SH

Susan Heald

Textiles Conservator, National Museum of the American Indian
SUSAN HEALD has been the National Museum of the American Indian’s textile conservator since 1994, and was the Minnesota Historical Society’s textile conservator from 1991- 1994. Susan was awarded a Smithsonian Institution Conservation Analytical Lab postgraduate fellowship in... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Lam

Thomas Lam

conservation scientist, Smithsonian Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University. After his PhD, Thomas completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Thomas is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledge... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:30pm

(Wooden Artifacts) A case study of the examination and conservation treatment of a mid-18th c. American made chair, and the processes of recreating missing carved elements using traditional methods.
In 1857, Thomas U. Walter designed the chairs and desks that would furnish the Hall of Representatives for the Thirty-fifth United States Congress. Designs for the chair were completed in the spring of 1857, and an order of 262 chairs was split between two separate manufactures. The deadline for the chairs was for December 1st 1857. The MFA, Boston acquired 1 of the 262 chairs in 1980. The armchair’s structure was stable, but the surface was in very poor condition and there was extensive loss of the decorative carved wood molding. The chair was missing molding on both front leg corners, and the entire length of molding under the proper left seat rail. The molding had a beveled edge design with a carved heart and dart pattern on the top surface. Due to the large quantity of the missing moldings, it was decided that fills would be carved from oak to match the surviving molding. In order to draft and carve the fills, an examination was carried out to understand the original methods used to make the chair. This included identifying which parts were machine-made verses handmade. During a visual examination, it became apparent that the chair’s frame was machine cut, and the decorative elements were hand carved. X-ray analysis confirmed that majority of the hand carved molding was simply glued to the main frame. This evidence supported the idea that the chair was part of an assembly line production system. Several attempts of the fills were made using different degrees of machine and hand tooling. Creating the fills using traditional methods proved to be very successful. It also revealed the skills and shortcuts of the original manufacturer. There was very little historical documentation about the chair in the museum records. However, it did state that the attributed maker was Bembé and Kimbel, a New York City based company. During the mid-18th c., the Bembé and Kimbel company was well establish and greatly acclaimed for their high quality of handmade furniture. Based on the evidence found during the chair’s initial examination, suspicion arose over the attributed maker of the chair. Further investigation lead to the second manufacturer that helped complete the large order of chairs. The Desk Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia was contracted to help fulfill half of the order. The company was commissioned because they advertised their fast, large scale machine manufacturing techniques. The evidence of the chair’s construction, as well as additional historical documentation, helped confirm that the MFA’s chair was made by The Desk Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia. This investigation of the materials helped reveal the methods and techniques of the original makers, and helped provide evidence towards the correct authentication. It also helped with the process of using traditional methods to create large fills. A full case study of the conservation treatment will be presented to discuss this investigation and the results of using traditional materials as part of the treatment.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Storti

Christine Storti

Furniture Conservator, MFA Boston
Christine Schaette received her bachelor's degree in furniture conservation from the University of Applied Sciences, Cologne, Germany, in 2006. During this time she interned at the Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Arts, New York. In September... Read More →

Co-Authors
GH

Gordon Hanlon

Head of Furniture and Frame Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Gordon Hanlon joined the MFA as Head of Furniture and Frame Conservation in January 2000 after 12 years at the J.Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. After receiving his BA in Biology from the University of York he studied first furniture making at the London College of Furniture followed... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) A Collaborative Model for Rock Art Conservation in the Algerian Desert
Algeria, the biggest country in North Africa with an area over 2 million square kilometers, has seven stunning UNESCO World Heritage sites. Among them are the earliest prehistorical sites in North Africa: the Oldwayen site of Ain el-Hanech, 1.8 million years BC. The area is enormous and it is difficult to administer effective long-term site management, preservation, and preventative measures. Not only are these cultural heritage sites threatened by extreme weather and climate, but human intervention, looting, vandalism, and terrorism. In order to protect these vast heritage sites, in the mid 2000s the Algerian authorities created the “Algerian Cultural Parks Projects” in partnership with the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and executed by the Algerian Ministry of Culture. This launched a preventative conservation project applying a new model of local partnerships with Tuoareg and other tribal elders and stakeholders. 
Contained in this centralized Cultural Parks System are five major sites. Park of l’Ahaggar – over 633,000 km2; Tassili N’Ajjer Park – over 138,000 km2; Tindouf – over 168,000 km2; Atlas Saharian Park – over 63,000 km2; and Touat Gourarar Tidikelt Park – over 38,000 km2. The most important cultural heritage in this desert designation is the rock art. There are literally thousands of paintings and engravings out in the open, as well as sheltered in caves. They include masterpieces from the earliest period of art in the Sahara, the Large Wild Fauna Period. These life-size engravings of elephant, rhino, hippo, giraffe, and buffalo show a time when the Sahara was green and fertile. 
Conservation management in the Park of Ahaggar focused on the sites closest to roads and human communities, and then radiated out to the remote regions, often several days’ camel or jeep ride away. Preservation work commenced with detailed inventories including images, GPS, and narrative descriptions. For all the conservation surveys and routine checks, the Park recruited guides among the local population, namely the Touaregs. This detailed inventory work in remote regions was only possible with the collaboration and expertise of these partners, who are very familiar with the sites, locations, and routes. Most importantly, the communities and nomadic groups trust the guides; they often speak the same dialects, thereby facilitating a level of trust, access, and reliable information. The exchange of knowledge was two-way; the local Tuoareg elders and guides’ knowledge of the terrain, history, and symbolism of the sites was a rich resource that was documented as well. As archeological conservators, we were able to provide monitoring guidelines, compile massive data inventories, prioritize conservation site needs, and introduce an acceptable level of outside management to these sites. The relationships continue, as the guides serve on the “frontline” identifying areas of need and alerting archeological managers. This partnership has allowed for a much higher success in the protection of remote sites and movable cultural heritage, by developing a model based on trust, which has enabled government and university experts to work closely with local stewards. 

Speakers
avatar for Hakim Bouakkache

Hakim Bouakkache

Assistant Professor, University of Constantine, Algeria
Hakim Bouakkache is an assistant professor at the University of Constantine, in the department of archaeology and conservation, who helped design and build the collaborative conservation model for desert heritage sites. He worked at the National Museum Bardo in Algiers, and studied... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Julia M Brennan-[PA]

Julia M Brennan-[PA]

Owner, Textile Conservation Services / Caring For Textiles
Julia M. Brennan is a textile conservator based in Washington, DC. She has a passion for textiles, Asia, preserving heritage for our children and great greats, and teaching people how to care for their own cultural heritage.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Book and Paper) Cocktails and mixers: Ethanol-modified treatments for iron-gall ink.
Cocktails and mixers: Ethanol-modified treatments for iron-gall ink.
The admixture of ethanol to aqueous treatment solutions is commonly used by conservators to mitigate the solubility of water-sensitive media. Prior research and direct observations by Library of Congress conservators have likewise indicated promising applications for the addition of ethanol to treat manuscripts with water-sensitive iron-gall ink. Building on the pioneering research initiated by the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, which demonstrated the efficacy of calcium phytate and calcium bicarbonate to significantly slow the deteriorative mechanisms of iron-gall ink, a team of conservators and scientists at the Library of Congress sought the identify effective "cocktails", or ratios of ethanol and other components in the preparation of phytate and bicarbonate solutions.
This talk will present the results of a multi-year study comparing treatments on artificially-aged iron-gall ink, including washing in ethanol-water mixtures; varying proportions of ethanol in phytate and bicarbonate solutions; comparing ethanol-modified magnesium phytate with ethanol-modified calcium phytate; and ethanol-modified magnesium phytate at different pH values and solution concentrations. The presentation will also discuss the impact of the research on future treatment choices and procedures for iron-gall ink on paper.
Authors in Publication Order: Julie Biggs, Lynn Brostoff, Andrew Davis, Claire Dekle, Cyntia Karnes, Yasmeen Khan, Susan Peckham, and Cindy Connelly Ryan

Speakers
avatar for Julie Biggs-[PA]

Julie Biggs-[PA]

Senior Paper Conservator, Library of Congress
Julie Biggs is a Senior Paper Conservator at the Library of Congress, where she has focused on treatment of manuscripts and works on paper, led iron-gall ink treatment research, and managed large-scale collection stabilization and re-housing projects. She previously worked as a senior... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Lynn Brostoff

Lynn Brostoff

Research Chemist, Library of Congress
Lynn B. Brostoff holds a Masters Degree in Polymer Materials Science and a Ph.D. in Chemistry. In addition, Lynn holds a Masters Degree in Art History and a Certificate of Conservation with emphasis in Paper Conservation. For the last 25 years, Lynn has worked as a conservation scientist... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Davis

Andrew Davis

Chemist, Preservation Research and Testing Division, Library of Congress
Dr. Andrew Davis is a chemist and polymer scientist in Library of Congress’s Preservation Research and Testing Division. He is currently involved in work to analyze the Library’s various paper and polymer collections, with the goal of correlating fundamental polymer properties... Read More →
avatar for Claire Dekle

Claire Dekle

Senior Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Claire Dekle is a Senior Book Conservator at the Library of Congress. Her experience as a conservation liaison to the Manuscript Division of the Library, as well as her treatment responsibilities, rekindled an early interest in the conservation of iron-gall ink. She was a member of... Read More →
avatar for Cyntia Karnes-[PA]

Cyntia Karnes-[PA]

Paper Conservator, Art Gallery of Ontario
Cyntia Karnes is a Paper Conservator at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada, where she also has a private conservation practice. Previously she was a Senior Paper Conservator at the Library of Congress, following positions at the National Gallery of Art in D.C., and the... Read More →
avatar for Yasmeen Khan

Yasmeen Khan

Head of Paper Conservation, Library of Congress
Yasmeen Khan is Head of Paper Conservation at the Library of Congress. She has a BA in Middle Eastern Studies from Barnard College, and an MLIS from the University of Texas with an Advanced Certificate in Conservation. In 1996 she began working for the Library of Congress, initially... Read More →
avatar for Susan Peckham-[PA]

Susan Peckham-[PA]

Senior Paper Conservator, Library of Congress
Susan Peckham is a Senior Paper Conservator at the Library of Congress where she has worked for twelve years and enjoys acting as conservation liaison to the Prints and Photographs and Music Divisions. Previously, she worked for the National Archives and Records Administration, Smithsonian... Read More →
avatar for Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Preservation Science Specialist, Library of Congress
Cindy Connelly Ryan is a specialist in historic artists' practices with a background in physics (Carnegie-Mellon University) and art conservation (New York University). She held a Forbes Fellowship at the Freer/Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution before joining PRTD in... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston
  • Specialty Tracks Book and Paper
  • Cost Type Included with registration
  • Abstract ID 13678
  • Authors (in order) Julie Biggs, Lynn Brostroff, Cindy Connelly Ryan, Claire Dekle, Cyntia Karnes, Yasmeen Khan, Susan Peckham, Andrew Davis

3:00pm

(Electronic Media) Conservation Surveys for Time-based Media Art Collections
Collection surveys provide data to enable conservators to mitigate risks to art collections and to set priorities for item-level conservation going forward. Collection surveys are an essential tool to identify works with urgent needs, but assessing an entire collection of time-based media artworks can be daunting. These collections can exhibit great variations: obsolescent analog and digital videos; a multiplicity of film types, file-based works on optical media or hard drives; multi-channel projections/installations; software-based works; and works relying upon networks or databases, to name a few. Collection surveys typically focus primarily on environmental factors and item condition. However, with time-based media an depth-in examination of each individual artwork may not be feasible within the parameters of a survey. Common risks to time-based media art are material characteristics (such as inherent tape deterioration or the fragility of emulsion or substrates), and internal/external dependencies (such as obsolescence of critical equipment, software or communication protocols). While works in a collection may seem very disparate, a majority of works will fall into general categories that share at least some of the same risks. For example, multi-channel video works of a certain era likely use the same synchronizing devices. This session will propose categories that support the identification of works with shared risks and needs, drawing on an understanding of material characteristics, processes within a work, and artists’ working methods. Also, another historical emphasis of surveys – on environmental conditions and traditional storage practices – is not sufficient to identify risks. Time-based media artworks are increasingly created digitally, and digital holdings grow as older analog media are migrated to files for preservation. These artworks have not meshed easily with collection management and art handling practices, and in many cases are not given the same care as other art objects. New and reshaped museum systems are needed, and an examination of existing systems can be equally as important as the examination of the artworks themselves. Thus a survey should include information-gathering in areas such as descriptive systems and metadata management, the management of hardware and software, and the adequacy of digital storage systems. Taken together, the individual and systemic risks can then be weighed to develop a plan of action for the collection as a whole.

Speakers
avatar for Mona Jimenez

Mona Jimenez

Media Consultant and Principal, Materia Media
For 14 years, Jimenez led the development of curriculum for media conservation/preservation and collection management at the Moving Image Image Preservation Program at NYU, and taught extensively in these areas. In particular, she designed and taught the course Handling Complex Media... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Objects) Manganese Stain Reduction on an Ancient Greek Terracotta Vase
A 5th century BCE Greek red-figure terracotta pelike (jar) at the Harvard Art Museums exhibited areas of black manganese dioxide staining from burial. In addition to ceramics, these black stains are found on bone, glass and stone. They are not considered harmful to the object and are often left as part of its archaeological history. The disfiguring staining on this particular ceramic made interpretation of the painted design difficult necessitating treatment. Studies have been published on reducing manganese staining from glass, but very little was found for ceramics. Thus, a research project was undertaken to develop a safe method to reduce the manganese staining. A variety of treatment techniques were investigated including Nd:YAG and Er:YAG laser cleaning, and application of a range of chemicals by swabs and poultices. The latter was deemed the most promising option and a variety of poulticing materials, chelators and reducing agents were investigated. To avoid testing on the pelike itself, treatment options were evaluated first on terracotta mock-ups with artificial manganese staining and then on an ancient terracotta plate fragment with archaeological manganese staining. Based on the results, treatment was carried out on the pelike using a poultice of bentonite clay with 80:20 deionized water:ethanol. Bentonite is mostly sodium or calcium montmorillonite but also contains minor amounts of other minerals. It was chosen because it has a high ion exchange capacity (80-150 meq/100g) and thus was able to break the stain’s bond to the ceramic. After the poultice was applied, allowed to slowly dry and removed, a cotton swab dampened in water reduced the manganese staining. Because ethanol is a less effective solvent than water for soluble salts, it replaced a portion of water to minimize the amount of salts brought to the surface during treatment. The 80:20 ratio proved to be the most efficient at preventing the majority of salts while maintaining bentonite’s ability to reduce the staining. The thickness and the water content (Water content (Wc) = weight water/weight dry poultice) of the poultices were critical factors. Poultices used for effective treatment were about 3 mm thick with a Wc of approximately 5. If the poultice was too thin or the liquid content too low, the poultice dried quickly and was ineffective. The manganese staining was characterized by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS). SEM-EDS, XPS and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyze the bentonite poultice and the manganese stained terracotta before and after treatment. Results showed that the terracotta surface was unchanged and no bentonite was left behind. XPS analysis enabled identification of the manganese species present on the terracotta before treatment. The treatment of the pelike significantly reduced the manganese staining and achieved the desired outcome of a clearer interpretation of the painted design. The results of this research project can inform future treatments of manganese stained ceramics.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Costello-[PA]

Susan Costello-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Objects and Sculpture, Harvard Art Museums
Susan Costello received her MS from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. After graduating, she completed fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Worcester Art Museum. Currently, she is an associate conservator of objects and sculpture at the Harvard... Read More →

Co-Authors
KE

Katherine Eremin

Patricia Cornwell Senior Conservation Scientist, Harvard Art Museums
Katherine Eremin is the Patricia Cornwell Senior Conservation Scientist at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies/Harvard Art Museums. She previously worked as an inorganic scientist at the National Museums of Scotland and received her PhD in 1994 from the University... Read More →
avatar for Georgina Rayner

Georgina Rayner

Associate Conservation Scientist, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at the Harvard Art Museums
Georgina Rayner is an Associate Conservation Scientist at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at the Harvard Art Museums. Between 2013 and 2017 she was the Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral fellow in conservation science at the same institution. Georgina’s work... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Paintings) Material Insights and Challenges in the Treatment of Maarten de Vos’ "Portrait of a Woman"
Material analysis was crucial in treating Portrait of an Old Woman by Maarten de Vos (National Gallery of Art, Washington). During varnish removal the extent of overpaint became apparent; non-invasive and invasive analytical methods were used to determine its composition and distribution. Micro-sample analysis of the background and sitter’s hat revealed non-original materials: a discolored drying-oil layer (characterized by FTIR and GCMS); at least two layers of oil-based overpaint covering the hat; and at least three layers of oil-based overpaint covering the background. Stratigraphy revealed in cross sections guided decisions regarding treatment in these areas. The non-original oil layer was key to successful overpaint removal, providing a barrier between original and overpaint. More challenging was determining the extent of overpaint on the sitter’s black garment. Microscopic visual examination of the paint surface showed clear evidence of overpaint: a coarse-textured dark paint layer traversing cracks and damage in the underlying paint. A cross-section taken from the garment revealed two dark paint layers without intervening varnish or oil layer. The upper layer (the coarse dark overpaint noted above) was rich in smalt as determined by PLM and SEM-EDX (Si, Co, As, Ni identified). This layer also contains earth pigments (Fe) and small amounts of lead white (Pb). The lower layer did not contain smalt and had larger amounts of lead white and earths with traces of umber (Pb, Fe, Mn). To determine the extent of the dark, smalt-rich overpaint compared to the original paint, X-ray fluorescence imaging spectroscopy was performed. The co-localization of cobalt, arsenic, and nickel in the XRF maps indicated the presence of smalt across the garment. Smalt original to the painting was also present on the right side of the background. However, interestingly, the ratio of nickel to cobalt showed the smalt used in the background had a higher Ni content compared to that found in the garment, suggesting two different sources of smalt were used. XRF maps of Co, As and Ni have distributions that relate to the surface design of the garment; however, XRF maps of Pb, Fe, and Mn show a different design that may relate more to the lower, original paint layer identified in the cross-section. The inclusion of smalt in the overpaint, rare after the seventeenth century, suggests it was an early intervention. Subsequently, tests were undertaken to remove the overpaint from the garment. It was challenging, however, to see a clear separation between the overpaint and the original layer, and it was ultimately decided that full removal imparted too much risk. The dark overpaint was reduced slightly in some areas, and any discontinuities between overpaint and exposed original paint were compensated during retouching. The treatment of Portrait of a Woman offers an example of the important role analytical and imaging techniques play before and during treatment in identifying original versus non-original materials and making informed treatment decisions. By the same token, this project highlights the humbling physical limitations of treatment options that conservators often encounter despite having a thorough understanding of materials.

Speakers
avatar for Kari Rayner

Kari Rayner

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation, National Gallery of Art
Kari Rayner is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Kari graduated with her Master’s Degree in Art History and Certificate in Art Conservation from New York University in 2015 and interned at the Hamilton Kerr Institute... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for John Delaney

John Delaney

Senior Imaging Scientist, National Gallery of Art
John K. Delaney, Ph.D. is the Senior Imaging Scientist at the National Gallery of Art, where his research focuses on the development and application of remote sensing imaging methods for the study of works of art.
avatar for Kathryn Dooley

Kathryn Dooley

Research Scientist, National Gallery of Art
Kate Dooley is a Research Scientist in the Scientific Research Department at the National Gallery of Art and is interested in the spectroscopic identification and mapping of materials and chemical imaging methods. She graduated with her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Michigan... Read More →
avatar for E. Melanie Gifford-[Fellow]

E. Melanie Gifford-[Fellow]

Research Conservator for Painting Technology, National Gallery of Art
E. Melanie Gifford is a Research Conservator for Painting Technology at the National Gallery of Art where she uses technical analysis to consider the artistic decision-making process of Dutch and Flemish painters. She trained in art conservation at the Cooperstown Graduate Program... Read More →
avatar for Michael Palmer

Michael Palmer

Conservation Scientist, National Gallery of Art
Michael Palmer received his graduate training in botany from the University of Maryland in 1979. From 1980-1985 he held the position of wood researcher at Winterthur Museum and also taught in the conservation training program. Mr. Palmer joined the National Gallery of Art in 1985... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Platinum and Palladium Photographs - Rediscoveries
Co-Authors
CM

Constance McCabe

Head of Photograph Conservation, National Gallery of Art

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) The Norwich textile reference database, a collections care project
The city of Norwich, United Kingdom still produces beautiful and high-quality woolen textiles, although its heyday was between the 14th and 19th centuries. As a result of this active textile industry, garments and fabrics are found in numerous textile collections around the globe. In spite of its importance, information regarding dyes, mordants and technologies associated with dying practices in the city remain scarce. During the second half of the 18th century, when the trade of raw materials and finished goods was commonplace, merchant manufacturers used pattern books and cards containing textile swatches to facilitate sales and trade. Some of these outstandingly well-preserved pattern books survive. After thorough ethical conversations, a dye-and-mordant database incorporating chromatographic and spectroscopic data is being generated using samples from these pattern books. High-performance liquid chromatography – photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence (XRF), has allowed us to identify distinctive dye and mordant combinations, which, in parallel with collaborative historical and archival research, is aiding in understanding the industry’s practices. More importantly, this will ultimately support collections care by providing sound scientific information related to textiles’ constituent material properties, such as light and moisture sensitivity of certain color components.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Jocelyn Alcantara Garcia

Dr. Jocelyn Alcantara Garcia

Conservation Scientist - Assistant Professor, University of Delaware - Department of Art Conservation
Jocelyn Alcántara-García joined the University of Delaware in the fall of 2014 after working for about five years in interdisciplinary projects (predominantly in Mexico, where she was born, but also in the Czech Republic and Spain). All projects were conducted in close collaboration... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Michael Nix

Michael Nix

Independent Textile and Maritime Historian
Michael Nix obtained his PhD in maritime history at the Department of English Local History, Leicester University in 1991. He worked as the Research Manager for Transport and Technology in Major Projects and Research, Glasgow Museums, and has published books, papers and articles on... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

3:00pm

(Wooden Artifacts) Thomas Sheraton's "Red Oil"
Thomas Sheraton in The Cabinet Dictionary (1794) published a recipe for “red oil” that he recommended for use on mahogany. In 1996 the furniture lab at Peebles Island Conservation Center recreated red oil for use on a reproduction mahogany table. The table was a copy of the original and was placed in the same room with the same light exposure as the original table. This project was reported out to WAG in 1997 and again in 2011 as an example of how original finishes might have changed in appearance during the lifetime of the first owners.
In 2017 it was noticed that the cleaned surfaces of some 18th c. English chairs were remarkably like the available red oil sample boards from the 1996 project. With UV light and UV microscopy the similarity was also strong. Could the cleaned surfaces on the chairs be intact examples from the 18th c. of the use of Sheraton’s red oil?
As it worked out, new chairs were commissioned to round out the set of older English chairs. Since the evidence suggested that red oil was used as the original finish, Sheraton’s recipe was used on the new chairs. The result made it possible to compare the lurid appearance of brand new 18th c. chairs to their appearance after 250 years. More intriguing is that the red oil formula may contain a UV fluorescent ingredient that might make it possible to identify this finish in other situations.

Speakers
DB

David Bayne

Furniture - Peebles Island, NY State Bureau of Historic Sites
Since 1992 David Bayne has been the Furniture Conservator for the New York State Bureau of Historic Sites located at the Peebles Island Resource Center in Waterford New York. David graduated from Reed College with a degree in Biology in 1976. For the next 10 years he worked as a timber... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

3:30pm

Break in the Exhibit Hall
Thursday May 31, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Texas Ballrooms E-H (Exhibit Hall) Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Evaluation of Organosilicon Materials for Conservation of Ancient Grey Bricks
Grey bricks were produced manually and used as the major traditional building materials in ancient China. However, the characteristics of grey bricks make them vulnerable to water, salt and other environmental factors. Organosilicon materials, such as ethyl silicate, organosiloxanes, and silicone resin, have been tested as the effective protective materials for silicate based stones. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of different organosilicon materials on grey bricks by total and half immersions. The penetration depths, appearance alterations, water adsorptions, hydrophobic properties and compressive strengths were measured after the treatments. The samples were also experienced the salt solution immersion, freeze-thaw and UV aging tests to evaluate the durability of different conservation treatments. It is found that different characteristics of the organosilicon materials lead to different conservation performances, such as water repellence, consolidation effect and durability. But it remains difficult to determine an appropriate material for the conservation of ancient architecture built with grey bricks.

Speakers
avatar for Yue Yuan

Yue Yuan

Student, Zhejiang University

Co-Authors
ZF

Zhengrong Fu

research fellow, Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology
Research fellow at Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology.
CM

Chenglei Meng

research fellow, Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology
Research fellow at Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology.
JM

Jie Mi

Student, Zhejiang University
Undergraduate of Zhejing University, majoring in cultural heritage and museology.
XW

Xiaozhen Wang

Student, Zhejiang University
Undergraduate of Zhejing University, majoring in cultural heritage and museology.
HZ

Hui Zhang

Associate professor, Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China
Associate Professor,Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China. Mainly reasch about organic chemical synthesis

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Book and Paper) Chancery Master Exhibits - piecing it back together
The focus of this paper is the conservation of a17th c. map damaged by water and iron gall ink. Triggered by a document request for the Victoria County History project, archivist Amanda Bevan discovered the bad condition of a 17th c. map, which is of great historical interest. The map is part of a group of objects (C 110 64-67) dating from the mid-15th c. to the 18th c., which all had been evidence material in a court case: In his will, Samuel Travers dedicated the proceeds from the sale of his land to the establishment of a foundation for poor naval lieutenants. Travers’ will became the subject of much dispute and litigation and the trust relating to the Naval Knights was not validated until 26 July 1793, almost seventy years after his death. The map appears to have been worked with to the extent of its material failing, which led to the production of an 18th c. copy. The transfer process of the ink drawings involved pricking through the paper onto the new support. The map also shows staining from water damage, which would have contributed to the breakdown and removal of the adhesive holding the lining to the paper and exacerbated the iron gall ink damage. The three factors together, the iron gall ink degradation, the pricking and the water damage, led to the paper delaminating in fragments like a jigsaw. New treatment approaches for iron gall ink damage included the use of gels and a heat mat. This conservation project is a reflexion of recent developments in paper and book conservation at TNA's Collection Care Department. It included the identification of materials and the development of tailored conservation treatments with the help of the conservation scientists. It required historical research provided by the archivists and non-TNA historians. As a result, the map is being used as a case study for in-house training and for various outreach events. In the newly created position of the Senior Conservation Manager for Single Object Treatments I have been focussing on high profile documents and conservation challenges and directing the development and adaptation of new treatment methods. The present conservation project lent itself to contribute to TNA’s conservation skill development programme and to improve the organisation’s conservation methodology for single objects.

Speakers
avatar for Sonja Schwoll-[ACR]

Sonja Schwoll-[ACR]

Senior Conservation Manager - Treatment Single Objects, The National Archives
Sonja Schwoll ACR (Icon, UK) is Senior Conservation Manager – Treatment Single Objects at The National Archives. Previously, Sonja was Subject Leader for the Conservation of Books and Library Materials Programme at West Dean College and Associate Lecturer on the MA Conservation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Lora Angelova

Dr. Lora Angelova

Conservation Scientist, The National Archives, Kew
Lora Angelova is a Conservation Scientist at The National Archives, Kew. She obtained a PhD in chemistry from Georgetown University in conjunction with the scientific research department of National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC and has carried out research into gel cleaning of a... Read More →
RM

Rose Mitchell

Map Archivist, The National Archives
Rose Mitchell has for many years been map archivist at The National Archives of the United Kingdom and an historian of cartography.  She is co-author of Maps: their untold stories (Bloomsbury, 2014) and has written and given talks on a broad range of map-related topics based on the... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Collection Care) Making the Most of What You Have: Digital Documentation Solutions Utilizing Existing Software
Documentation is an important aspect of a conservator’s work and is essential for communication between conservators in the present and the future. While vital, documentation using traditional methods can also be very time consuming, when time is an ever more limited commodity. In an effort to streamline the documentation process, conservators at the Saint Louis Art Museum (SLAM) have implemented a process for digital condition reporting using Microsoft OneNote and tablet computers. While a number of options for digital condition reporting have presented themselves in recent years, these tend to rely on specialized software or apps and are often restricted to a single type of operating system. By using Microsoft OneNote, already a part of the museum’s IT infrastructure, and tablet PCs the conservation department has been able to improve the efficiency of documentation processes without purchasing additional software or placing undue burden on SLAM’s IT department. This paper will focus on the genesis and implementation of digital condition reporting at SLAM using Microsoft OneNote, including an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the process. The potential for further applications of Microsoft OneNote for collections documentation will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Raina Chao-[PA]

Raina Chao-[PA]

Associate Objects Conservator, Saint Louis Art Museum
Raina Chao received a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.A. in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007 and her M.A. in Art History and Advanced Certificate in Art Conservation from the Conservation Center at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University in 2011. She... Read More →
avatar for L. H.(Hugh) Shockey-[PA]

L. H.(Hugh) Shockey-[PA]

Head of Conservation | Objects Conservator, Saint Louis Art Museum
L. H. (Hugh) Shockey Jr. MS, AIC-PA is Head of Conservation and Object Conservator at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Previously he was the objects conservator at the Lunder Conservation Center of the Smithsonian American Art Museum where he performed treatment on electronic media and... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Mike Peters

Mike Peters

System Administrator, Saint Louis Art Museum
Mike Peters is a past System Administrator in the IT department at the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Electronic Media) Sounds Challenging: Documenting the Identity and Iterations of Ragnar Kjartansson's "The Visitors"
This talk demonstrates the application of a documentation framework for the aural elements in media installation art that the speaker presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting. The focus of this case study is "The Visitors" by Ragnar Kjartansson, a work jointly owned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. It was recently installed for the "Soundtracks" exhibition at SFMOMA. This large-scale, nine-channel video performance piece has been exhibited worldwide to great acclaim. The setting of the work is a stately, aged mansion in rural upstate New York. The artist gathered fellow musicians there in 2012 to perform an original composition with lyrics inspired by the writings of the poet and performance artist Ásdís Sif Gunnarsdóttir, his ex-wife. One of the themes in the work is the break-up of their marriage, giving the piece tremendous emotional range which has a corresponding broad dynamic range in terms of sound. The piece involves vocals and numerous musical instruments including two pianos, drums, electric and acoustic guitars, bass, banjo, accordion, and cello, as well as the sounds of the natural landscape, punctuated by two cannon blasts. Life-sized video projections of the individual musicians encircle the audience, whose experience ranges from contemplation of the solo performers to immersion in the music of the entire ensemble. This case study highlights the importance of collaboration between conservators and sound engineers, both within the institution and, where applicable, in the artist's studio. Central to the conservation documentation of the aural aspects of "The Visitors" was an in-depth interview with the artist's director of sound, Christopher W. McDonald. This talk will cover the identity of the work, including both its aural and visual aspects, characterization and assessment of the digital files, significant properties of audiovisual equipment and the acoustic environment, and documentation of the iteration at SFMOMA. Various methods, challenges, and limitations of documenting sound will be discussed, along with future directions for this research, including the further development of the framework and terminology for sound art documentation.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Brost

Amy Brost

Assistant Media Conservator, Museum of Modern Art
Amy Brost is an art conservator living in Brooklyn. She is currently Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Media Conservation at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York. In 2016, she earned an M.A. in the History of Art and Archaeology and an M.S. in Conservation of Historic and Artistic works... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Objects) Loss Compensation on Ceramics using Photogrammetry, Digital Modeling and 3D Printing
This paper will describe some tools for producing detailed, 3D printed restorations for ceramics that may also be applicable to other areas of conservation. Photogrammetry is a 3D imaging process that is relatively easy to do with standard photography equipment in the conservation lab, provided one has a computer with a sufficient processing capability. Agisoft PhotoScan was used to create three dimensional mesh models of several different ceramics that were in need of restoration. The project involved experimentation with available 3D modeling and sculpting programs. Autodesk Meshmixer, a free software system, was selected to digitally ”sculpt” and process the meshes for a 3D print in resin. The finished resin parts were then easily attached to the body of the ceramic and painted using conventional methods. The ceramics in this study include a small Meissen porcelain with a missing right hand and eyeglass lens, a 12th century Persian ceramic with a missing handle, and an 18th century English delftware posset pot lacking sculptural elements on the lid. The use of 3D printed parts resolved a variety of problems commonly found in ceramic restoration, such as complex and simple modeling, shiny glazed surfaces, achieving fine detail on very small elements, mirroring of meshes to create a right hand from a digital model of the left, and the need for precise joins on complex break edges. While the learning curve for using these programs is steep, familiarity makes the operator more efficient, and there are a number of advantages to printing these restorations instead of using conventional techniques. First of all, handling of the artifact is dramatically reduced, an important safety factor. Conventional modeling and casting of very small detailed parts, such as a missing porcelain hand, is challenging for many, and may require some creative interpretation by the conservator. However, with digital models, it is possible to provide a more “authentic” restoration. For example, a missing left hand can be created and articulated from a digital mesh model of the right hand. Thus, the restored right hand, as a mirror image of the original left hand, could be considered a closer iteration of the artist’s intent. It is also very easy to create a digital mesh of the “stump” or break edges of the ceramic and use this to make a nearly perfect match in the printed restoration. One practical and timesaving advantage is that much of the imaging and printing work can be subcontracted to volunteers, students or contractors who have specialized digital skills. Sharing the highly accurate digital models based on laser scanning or photogrammetry will also make similar examples by the same artist or workshop easier to share, either for the purpose of loss compensation or study. The digital files are also available for future research. Finally, the use of 3D digital models allows for experimentation that is helpful in discussing positioning and articulation of restorations with curators. The techniques discussed here are likely to have applications beyond ceramic restoration.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Garland-[Fellow]

Kathleen Garland-[Fellow]

Conservator, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kathleen M. Garland received her BA in Art History from Brown University, and her MA in Art Conservation from the State University of New York, Cooperstown. She completed her internship in the Sculpture Conservation Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. From 1986-89... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Spence

Stephanie Spence

Conservation Fellow, Toledo Museum of Art
Stephanie Spence received her M.A. and Certificate of Advanced Study from the Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State College, State University of New York where she specialized in objects conservation, with interests in Asian lacquer and metals. Stephanie received her B.A. in Art... Read More →

Co-Authors
RB

R. Bruce North

Conservation Department Volunteer, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
R. Bruce North received his BS in Ocean Engineering from Florida Institute of Technology and his MS in Civil Engineering from the University of Houston. He retired from a career in Structural Engineering and Project Management and is currently providing volunteer assistance to the... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Paintings) Unusual activities between image and panel: a sixteenth-century painting of St. Catherine in the Yale University Art Gallery
In his 1916 catalogue of the James Jackson Jarves collection, the art historian Osvald Sirén considered a small painting of St. Catherine of Siena and remarked that the picture “...has lost a good deal of its pictorial bouquet.” His sympathetic but dismissive words are one of the only published statements on this painting, which dates to sixteenth-century Siena and after a series of attributions is now being reconsidered as a late work of Sodoma. Overlooked by the mid-twentieth century cleaning campaign that affected the majority of the Italian paintings at Yale, the painting remained understudied until the fall of 2016, when it was pulled from storage for conservation treatment and analysis. The resulting project uncovered an unusual relationship between the image formed by the paint film and the support beneath it, which in turn became a determining factor in the treatment the painting received. Questions concerning how the image layer relates to the support immediately arose when examination of the painting began. X-radiography, followed by computerized tomography (CT) scanning, confirmed that worm tunnels had been filled with a radio-opaque material from the front of the panel, not the reverse. This observation establishes that the painting was either transferred to its present support, painted on an old, previously worm-eaten piece of wood, or painted on paper then mounted to old wood. The possibility of a transfer seemed, initially, most likely: no trace of paper has yet been found, the ground varies markedly in thickness as it extends across the panel, and certain areas of paint appear to rest directly on a thick, glue-like layer. However, the CT scan also confirmed that all but two of the largest disruptions to the surface of the painting correspond directly to knots in the present panel. Such connections between panel and paint film indicates that the support has long induced damage to the image it holds—an observation in tension with the aforementioned indications that the two materials were not always attached to one another. The working provisional explanation for the fraught relationship between image and panel is as follows: at a date prior to the painting’s purchase by Jarves in roughly 1850, the image layer was temporarily separated from the panel. The exposed face of the panel was coated with the observed radio-opaque material, and the image layer was re-glued to its original support, in what could be named an “auto-transfer.” The paper will explore this possibility alongside others. Precedents within the transfer literature will be described, including a little-discussed 1751 reference to an auto-transfer technique. Since the potential St. Catherine auto-transfer has a terminus post quem of 1850, this example could complicate the prevalent notion that nineteenth-century restorers considered the essence of the work of art to reside only in the image layer. 

Speakers
avatar for Annika Finne

Annika Finne

PhD student, Institute of Fine Arts New York University
Annika Finne received a M.A. in Art History and an M.S. in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, with a speciality in paintings conservation, from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2016. She is currently a Robert Lehman Fellow for Graduate Study in the... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Irma Passeri

Irma Passeri

Senior Conservator of Paintings, Yale University Art Gallery
Irma Passeri is Senior Paintings Conservator at the Yale University Art Gallery. She received her degree in the Conservation of Easel Paintings from the Conservation School of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, in Florence in 1998. Prior to working for the Yale Art Gallery, she worked... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Photographic Materials) Finding a Balance: Conservation of the Dolley Madison Cased Image from the Greensboro History Museum
Cased images differ significantly from conventional forms of paper-based photography. The daguerreotype is distinguished by its metallic composition: a thin copper plate with a highly polished silver surface was vulnerable to marring, abrasion, scratches, tarnish, rust, and corrosion. As a result, cases were constructed from decoratively covered wood or ornamentally molded thermoplastic to protect these fragile images. Conservation of these cased images is complicated. Not only is one dealing with a photographic image but also with leather, velvet, wood, plastic, cloth, metal, glass, and varnish. As a conservator it is important that the conservation and preservation approaches find a balance between the photographic image and its traditional housing. Using the Dolley Madison cased image from The Greensboro History Museum, as an example, this talk will discuss the conservation of the daguerreotype plate and its severely compromised gold stamped blue velvet case that was created in the semblance of a book. Adopting techniques and materials from book conservation as well as objects conservation, the cover was reattached, the spine was repaired and modified to create a safer opening of the case, and missing tray components were recreated using traditional water gilding techniques on wood.

Speakers
avatar for Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Senior Photograph Conservator, Northeast Document Conservation Center
Monique C. Fischer is the senior photograph conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) in Andover, MA.  She holds a master’s degree in art conservation from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum, and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Smith College... Read More →
avatar for Terra Huber-[PA]

Terra Huber-[PA]

Assistant Paper Conservator, NEDCC
Terra Huber has studied and worked in the field of conservation since 2009. They are currently an Assistant Paper Conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center and have completed internships at The Newberry Library, the Walters Art Museum, the Boston Athenaeum, the Historical... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) A sizable sooty soiled surface: Analyzing and evaluating methods for surface cleaning a large painted muslin
Throughout the documentation and treatment of an unusually large painted muslin, analytical methods helped to both characterize the object, and evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. Displayed at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, the muslin painted by Strike the Kettle (Lakota), a follower of Sitting Bull, depicts multiple scenes including gift giving, cooking, and warriors on horseback. The muslin was treated for the major long-term exhibition, Americans, at the National Museum of the American Indian. Previous extended display in the industrial urban centers of Chicago and New York City resulted in heavy, sooty, lead-containing surface soiling. Prominent tar-like stains in the center had haloed tidelines from an earlier treatment attempt. Pigments, binder, and stain residue were characterized using microscopy, portable x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), microscope-FTIR, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Analyses confirmed that common late 19th century trade pigments were used with a proteinaceous binder. All paint colors were evaluated for light stability using microfadeometry, revealing all but one were stable. The black stain was characterized as an oily resinous compound with surprisingly high lead levels. The treatment priority was to reduce the stain and its associated tideline, and disfiguring surface soiling. Vacuuming the muslin through Vellux fabric trapped significant soiling, however the visual impact was minimal requiring additional dry cleaning treatment. Of the four sponges evaluated, the vulcanized rubber soot sponge was most effective though somewhat abrasive based on cleaning tests, microscopy, FTIR, and pXRF. The need for multiple hands working simultaneously over a large surface area necessitated a systematic approach to ensure consistency. This cleaning methodology produced large quantities of heavily soiled Vellux and sponges, allowing for a thorough study of cleaning mechanisms and soiling characteristics. While the tar-like stain responded poorly to all solvents tested, ethanol and a suction platen successfully reduced the tidelines created by the previous treatment. The treatment methods dramatically improved the muslin’s appearance. Final pXRF analyses indicated the soot sponge was more effective at reducing overall lead levels than the use of a Vellux-covered vacuum alone. Portable XRF also detected lead levels on the used Vellux and soot sponges, but not the nitrile gloves, which had implications for material disposal as potential hazardous waste.

Speakers
SH

Susan Heald

Textiles Conservator, National Museum of the American Indian
SUSAN HEALD has been the National Museum of the American Indian’s textile conservator since 1994, and was the Minnesota Historical Society’s textile conservator from 1991- 1994. Susan was awarded a Smithsonian Institution Conservation Analytical Lab postgraduate fellowship in... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nora Frankel

Nora Frankel

Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation, National Museum of the American Indian
Nora Frankel is an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Textile Conservation at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Past work includes positions at the Rijksmuseum, Burrell Collection, Death Valley National Park, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Gwénaëlle Kavich

Dr. Gwénaëlle Kavich

Conservation Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Gwénaëlle Kavich, Conservation Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute, earned a BSc in Chemistry from The Nottingham Trent University (U.K.) and a PhD in Chemical Sciences from the University of Pisa (Italy). She contributes to a wide range of technical studies... Read More →
avatar for Annaick Keruzec

Annaick Keruzec

collections contractor, Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum
Annaick Keruzec is a textile conservator who currently works at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum as a collections contractor. From 2015-2017 she was an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). Her research... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Lam

Thomas Lam

conservation scientist, Smithsonian Conservation Institute
Thomas Lam has a Ph.D. in Ceramics from Alfred University. After his PhD, Thomas completed a postdoc at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Thomas is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where he applies his knowledge... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Little

Nicole Little

Physical Scientist, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Nicole Little is a Physical Scientist at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum Conservation Institute. She received both her B.A. and M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Missouri-Columbia, where her master’s research dealt with the compositional analysis of Mayan ceramics... Read More →
avatar for Megan Doxsey Whitfield

Megan Doxsey Whitfield

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Object Conservation, National Museum of the American Indian
Megan Doxsey-Whitfield is currently a Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation at the National Museum of the American Indian. She is a graduate of the Queen’s University Master of Art Conservation program (MAC ’15) and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from the University of... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Preventive conservation training in the Moche Valley, Peru
The MOCHE, Inc. Conservation Field School in summer 2017 (Huanchaco, Peru) provided training in preventive conservation and collections care on archaeological sites to binational undergraduate, graduate, and pre-program students . This paper reports on the program, which, co-directed by an archaeologist and conservator, aimed to bridge the gaps between training for work in the field and for work in museum collections. The program provided the opportunity for students to gain an encompassing perspective of the life-history of material culture from excavation through processing and analysis, to storage and display. We believe this holistic perspective is essential for all cultural heritage professionals, yet training programs of this type are not always available. Participants came to the program with varying levels of skills and experience in archaeology and conservation. American students and Peruvian students from the Universidad Nacional de Trujillo worked together on excavated materials from the regional survey led by UNT's archaeology lab. The students participated in archaeological excavation, finds processing, and recording, working hands-on with finds from the current and previous field seasons. As part of program curriculum they also learned about and engaged in basic conservation and collections management principles and practices. This work complemented the field school’s instruction in the materials that make up the archaeological record and the prehistory of the north coast of Peru. Students used close observation of the project collections to understand how the objects were made and used, and identified modifications in the objects from initial use-life and those occurring during deposition and post-excavation. Students visited archaeological storage facilities in Peru and learned about principles of safe storage and packing for archaeological finds. At the close of the program, students carried out some of the proposed improvements for safe objects packing using appropriate materials and methods. The students also visited archaeological sites and museums throughout the region to understand the benefits and risks that tourism development brings to local communities. This program is part of MOCHE Inc’s broader heritage preservation efforts. MOCHE, INC (Mobilizing Opportunities for Community Heritage Empowerment, http://savethemoche.org/) is an organization founded by archaeologists dedicated to improving the standard of living in impoverished communities, preserving archaeological sites, and promoting research and education on the rich cultural heritage of Peru. MOCHE Inc.’s work over the past 20 years in Peru has demonstrated that close community ties and community-oriented projects go hand in hand with preserving archaeological sites. This project demonstrates that preventive conservation need not be narrowly construed as concerning only tasks such as managing museum and storage environments (of course very important topics on their own) but can also encompass a variety of other community engagement and education activities crucial to the goal of heritage preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Jess Walthew

Jess Walthew

Conservator, Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum
Jessica Walthew is an objects conservator at Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum. She holds an MA in Art History and Archaeology with advanced certificate in Conservation from NYU's Institute of Fine Arts, Conservation Center. Her research and teaching interests include history... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Alicia Boswell

Alicia Boswell

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Cultures of Conservation, Bard Graduate Center/Metropolitan Museum of Art
I am an anthropological archaeologist whose research examines the dynamics of complex societies and interactions between PrenColumbian groups in different ecological zones of the Andes. My field research prioritizes examining the lived experience of household and producer communities... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Book and Paper) Peregrinations of an 18th-Century Armenian Prayer Scroll
Armenian prayer scrolls are Christian talismans used to protect bearers from harm, to promote healing of illness, and to ensure good fortune. Hmayil, the Armenian name for these scrolls, means “enchantment ” in Old Armenian. Early examples were manuscripts, but printed scrolls became common with the advent of movable type. There are three printed Armenian prayer scrolls in the collections of the Library of Congress. All were printed at about the same date, in the same city. All are illustrated, but the individual palettes used for coloring the woodcuts are very different. This presentation will focus on the recent conservation treatment of a severely damaged hmayil, and will highlight the complicated and precise procedures of the treatment and housing as well as the scientific analysis of the scroll. The hmayil was printed in Constantinople in 1729; the text was printed on European paper with movable type and the illustrations added as woodcuts. It is about 3.5 inches wide, but 15 feet long. When the Library received the scroll, it was broken into fourteen fragments of varying lengths despite evidence of several efforts to restore and repair it. Stains and surface dirt disfigured the paper and obscured the hand-colored illustrations. Given the size of the object and the labor intensive treatment needed, the conservators considered treatment materials and methods to determine a treatment process that would be both efficient and sustainable. In addition, they carefully organized the project to maintain consistency in procedures while retaining flexibility to respond to new challenges that might arise. The treatment employed materials relatively new to conservation and blended Western and Eastern conservation techniques. For example, fragments were washed on layers of non-woven polyester-cellulose cloth (Tekwipe®), chosen for its strong vertical capillary action and reusability. To stabilize fragments and reconstruct the original sequence of the scroll, primary and secondary linings of two different Asian papers were applied using a combination of traditional Asian and Western lining techniques. To dry the linings, conservators used both Japanese materials and methods for tensioned drying, as well as Western papermakers’ felts. Since the strength and flexibility of the paper did not permit returning the scroll into its original format, a Western method of storage and presentation - window mats – was used, but their structure was tailored to meet the special needs of the curator and researchers. The conservators investigated the colorants used in the scroll by non-destructive analytical techniques: multi-spectral imaging and X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The findings will be discussed in the presentation. The characterization also establishes a future direction for research by a multidisplinary team to compare different color palettes from the Library’s hmayils and the reference collection of Armenian pigments available to the Library, with the goal of contributing to the knowledge of historical Armenian artist’s materials.

Speakers
avatar for Xiaoping Cai

Xiaoping Cai

Pine Tree Foundation Fellow, The Morgan Library & Museum
Xiaoping Cai is currently the Pine Tree Foundation Rare Book Conservation fellow in the Thaw Conservation Center of the Morgan Library & Museum. Prior to the fellowship, she completed an Advanced Internship in Book Conservation at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. During... Read More →
avatar for Emily Williams

Emily Williams

Conservator, Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
Emily obtained her bachelor’s degree in conservation from Camberwell College of Art before receiving a  postgraduate diploma in Art History from Courtauld Institute of Art and a Master of Arts in conservation from University College London. She is currently undertaking a two-year... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Sylvia Albro-[PA]

Sylvia Albro-[PA]

Senior Paper Conservator, Library of Congress
Sylvia Albro was graduated from the New York State University Graduate Program in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works in Cooperstown New York in 1982. She completed a graduate internship in conservation of works of art on paper at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco... Read More →
avatar for Levon Avdoyan

Levon Avdoyan

Area Specialist for Armenia and Georgia, Library of Congress
Levon Avdoyan earned his MA, MPhil and PhD in Ancient History with a Minor in Armenian History and Civilization from Columbia University. After spending a year as a fellow at Dumbarton Oaks Center for Byzantine Studies in Georgetown, he joined the Library of Congress in 1977, first... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Brostoff

Lynn Brostoff

Research Chemist, Library of Congress
Lynn B. Brostoff holds a Masters Degree in Polymer Materials Science and a Ph.D. in Chemistry. In addition, Lynn holds a Masters Degree in Art History and a Certificate of Conservation with emphasis in Paper Conservation. For the last 25 years, Lynn has worked as a conservation scientist... Read More →
avatar for Claire Dekle

Claire Dekle

Senior Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Claire Dekle is a Senior Book Conservator at the Library of Congress. Her experience as a conservation liaison to the Manuscript Division of the Library, as well as her treatment responsibilities, rekindled an early interest in the conservation of iron-gall ink. She was a member of... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Collection Care) How to Label Everything – A Review of Current Best Practices in Natural History Labelling
Natural history collections are used primarily for research by scientists and academics. These collections are continually growing to track information about species and populations in the natural world. These collections are often quite large and labels are fundamental to help distinguish one specimen from its similar looking neighbours. Labels in natural history collections often contain original information which is not recorded elsewhere in museum records and specimens without labels are generally regarded as having no research value. Labels should last as long as their associated specimens. Finding materials to ensure the archival properties for each element of the label, including paper, plastic, inks and adhesives, can be a daunting affair. At the Canadian Museum of Nature, we undertook a comprehensive review of our labelling protocols. The results have been disseminated on the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections wiki page on Best Practices for Labelling Natural History Collections. It addresses a tremendous range of labelling issues that can be easily adapted to other collections from inorganic to organic, microscopic to massive, and wet to dry to ultra-cold. The project’s aim was to improve the decision making about the selection and purchasing of labelling materials. We presented our results to maximize end user benefits. We identified three generalized natural history labelling scenarios: dry labels, wet labels and ultra-cold labels. For each scenario, we made a decision tree to clarify and highlight the logic behind the selection of certain materials. To facilitate purchasing of the best materials, we summarized key archival concepts, terms, and symbols used by commercial suppliers that curatorial staff are likely to encounter on supplier websites. We also summarized relevant industry and government standards relating to archival materials, which could be used to objectively evaluate materials. Finally, we summarized previously-developed simple testing protocols that could be used to evaluate purchased materials once acquired. Focusing on the end users, through decision trees to present key information to facilitate purchasing, has been well received and has great potential to be adapted to other categories of archival materials for which conservators make recommendations. This project also highlighted the challenges in making effective recommendations when new archival materials continue to be developed and adopted. As a profession, we therefore need to continue to have higher level discussions among all stakeholders including, but not limited to, manufacturers, purchasers, conservators, conservation scientists, and standards and testing organizations. A more comprehensive understanding of material science, industry standards and simple tests for archival quality will help collections care staff make informed decisions when selecting labeling materials.

Co-Authors
LC

Luci Cipera

Conservator, Canadian Museum of Nature
Luci Cipera works as a conservator at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Luci joined the Canadian Museum of Nature in 2004 on the team responsible for moving the bird and mammal galleries during the museum’s renovation. She is a graduate of the Master of Art Conservation program at... Read More →
avatar for Erika Range

Erika Range

Conservation Technician, Canada Science and Technology Museum
Erika Range is an emerging cultural heritage professional and conservator. She completed her undergraduate degree from Trent University in Anthropology, graduating with high honours in 2008. She has also completed a master’s degree from University College London (2010) in Principles... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Electronic Media) VR tools as spatial documentation
As a Time-based media conservator at Tate, recent experience installing complex multi-channel sound pieces led me to think more deeply about how we install and document these types of artworks.

Our aim as conservators is to understand the display parameters of a work, defining whether visual and technical properties of equipment or space are conceptual or incidental. This influences our options for the preservation of an artwork. Acoustic aspects of a work have mostly related to specific equipment, or appropriate spaces for installation, but we do not currently capture information regarding the acoustic properties of a space, leading us to consider the questions we want to ask regarding the environment in which an artwork is installed.

In looking at the relationship between the aesthetics and the acoustics of space holistically, we can easily see how the design of a space becomes an intervention into a work: lessening the acoustic reflection of a space becomes a treatment. In comparison to video and visual works, where, as a community we have a rich and nuanced vocabulary to describe the work within a space and the treatments we might apply, the corresponding vocabulary and shared understanding of audio treatment feels frozen in a more primitive state. This is reflected by our documentation, which historically has been limited to text and pictorial representation. What if our documentation closer resembled the artwork medium?

In this presentation I would like to share our experimentation in practically applying current recording technologies to documentation, our exploration of it’s uses, limitations and dissemination. Starting with the technique of binaural recording, we are able to accurately capture the spatiality of sound within a space, and provide greater context by a point of view video recording, for viewing on a monitor or a VR headset for a more immersive experience. This can expand into spherical photos and videos, in which the wearer of a headset is able to freely look around a space.

Once virtual reality is introduced as a tool, it raises many questions about where accurate documentation ends and synthetic reconstruction begins, and for what purposes should the resulting documentation be used for? Given how easy it is to embed 360 files in a web browser to be viewed on a phone, should we be rethinking the idea of the viewing copy, or the thumbnail image?

In sharing this, I hope to raise questions around a potential new documentation framework, and also highlight a new and exciting area of ethics.

Speakers
avatar for Jack McConchie

Jack McConchie

Time-based media Conservator, Tate
Jack McConchie is a Time-based media conservator at Tate, responsible for installing works across all four Tate sites, as well as developing collection care and acquisition strategies. He graduated from the University of Glasgow in 2004 with a degree in Electronics and Music, before... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Objects) The Use of 3D Printing for Casting Proportional Replicas Used in the Treatment of Articulated Skeletons
The anatomical accuracy of natural science specimens is important for their use in education and display. This case study explores the recreation of missing elements of an articulated brant goose skeleton (Branta bernicla) from a study collection in the Ornithology Department at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The articulated skeleton was treated during a course at the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (NYU). In current AMNH practice, molds taken from other specimens of the same species are often used to cast replacement elements missing from an articulated skeleton. However, the goose skeleton in this case study is larger than other brant specimens at the AMNH, so casts made in the usual way would not have been proportionally correct. To create replicas of the required size, the analogous bones from a smaller specimen were laser scanned at NYU’s LaGuardia Studio, a facility providing advanced digital media services to faculty, students, and visiting artists. The scans were enlarged using modeling software and then used to 3D-print a model of each bone. In order to ensure low cost with long-term stability, the printed models were then used to create silicone molds from which casts were made in a stable epoxy. This presentation will detail the options available for 3D scanning, file manipulation, and printing, with emphasis on cost, practicability, and long-term stability. Both the printing process and printing materials will be discussed. For this case study, the final cost was under $60 for the scanning and printing of five small bones. Including creating the second molds, the treatment required about 20 hours, spread over a few weeks. The lag time was mostly due to scheduling with the LaGuardia Studio rather than the necessity of the process. Combining digital technology with traditional mold-making techniques allowed for the more accurate calculation of shape and proportion of the bone replicas and the creation of highly detailed molds quickly and economically.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Haynes

Christine Haynes

Graduate Intern, IFA-NYU / Hirshhorn
CHRISTINE HAYNES is a fourth-year objects student at the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She is currently completing her graduate year internship at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. She has interned at the Metropolitan Museum of Art... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Julia	Sybalsky

Julia Sybalsky

Senior Associate Conservator, American Museum of Natural History
Julia Sybalsky is an Associate Conservator at the AMNH, where she began working in January of 2010. She was an important contributor in the recently-completed renovation of dioramas in the Hall of North American Mammals and the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall. Julia's work supports... Read More →
avatar for Fran Ritchie-[PA]

Fran Ritchie-[PA]

Assistant Conservator, American Museum of Natural History
Fran Ritchie is an Objects Conservator who specializes in the preservation of natural history collections. She is currently an Assistant Conservator in the Anthropology Objects Conservation Lab at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), working with a team on the treatment... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Paintings) Research and Conservation of Peter Paul Rubens, The Raising of the Cross, oil on paper, 1638
The Raising of the Cross, an oil painting on paper, was painted by Rubens for the production of an engraving by Jan Witdoeck and the image is based on the triptych of the same title, now in the Cathedral of our Lady in Antwerp and painted by Rubens in 1610-11. The sketch was acquired in 1928, as an 'oil on canvas' by the Art Gallery of Toronto as it was called, from the Holford Collection through Christie’s London. The painting was ‘cleaned’ by Thos. Agnew and Sons, London prior to the sale. Extensive restoration followed: first in 1937 in New York City and, after two thefts in 1954 and 1959, at the Art Gallery of Ontario. It is not known at what point the paper was lined to canvas but it is currently glue lined to cotton canvas. Restoration methods followed the traditions of painting conservation and the paper support at some point became obscured by extensive overpainting. Documentation and understanding of the work was essential to complex decisions of removal and the reconstruction of areas that suffered loss of form and detail. Interruptions in the surface tonality by discoloured retouchings and the discontinuity and flattening of form due to severe abrasion and loss of surface paint interfered with one’s appreciation of the work. Scientists at the Canadian Conservation Institute provided support in the initial investigations and at intervals in the treatment process by undertaking non-invasive x-ray fluorescence and analysis of samples as required. Samples were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, polarized light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry and, in one case, by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Infrared Reflectography (OSIRIS) was carried out by Rachel Billinge, National Gallery, London. Removal of restoration additions was challenging and time consuming and areas of ambiguity remain untouched. Recent work exposes at least some of the original intentions of the artist. Much of the paper support however modified in colour and texture, now contributes to the final image. The leached and damaged paint layers were minimally saturated with MS2A and retouching carried out with watercolour. The relationship of the sketch to the engraving and to the earlier painting will be discussed. Both informed the finish of the AGO painting. Several pentimenti remain visible and reveal the working method of the artist. The painting was reframed in a new frame to conceal the eight centimeter extension at the top border which is not by Rubens.

Speakers
avatar for Sandra Webster Cook

Sandra Webster Cook

Conservator of Paintings, Historical and Modern, Art Gallery of Ontario
Sandra Webster-Cook became an employee of the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in 1987. She is currently responsible for the conservation of the historical and modern paintings in the collection of the AGO. Her work on the Canadian Historical collection included research on the paintings... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Kate Helwig

Kate Helwig

Senior Conservation Scientist, Canadian Conservation Institute, Canadian Conservation Institute
Kate Helwig has an honours B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Toronto and a Master’s degree in Physical Chemistry from Stanford University in California. She studied artifact conservation at Queen’s University and received a Master’s Degree in Art Conservation in 1992... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alexandra (Sasha) Suda

Dr. Alexandra (Sasha) Suda

Curator European Art. Fraser Elliott Chair, Print & Drawing Council, Art Gallery of Ontario
Sasha Suda, who holds a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, joined the AGO in 2011 as Assistant Curator, European Art. She was promoted first to Associate Curator, European in 2013, then Curator and R. Fraser Elliott Chair, Print & Drawing Council in 2015, and... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Photographic Materials) Investigation of Portrait with Applied Oil Color
A small painted portrait of Carl Maria Von Weber on a wood support was treated at West Lake Conservators. Analysis confirmed the presence of a silver-based underlying image, bringing particular challenges to the treatment approach. The proposed presentation focuses on the analysis and investigation that was performed in the attempt to positively identify a photographic base and how it was ultimately inconclusive. The decision making process for the treatment that was carried out was informed by the possibility of the presence of a photographic print. High Energy Synchrotron Source XRF analysis confirmed and mapped the presence of silver which could signify either an underlying photographic print or a silver point drawing. Additional microscopy was carried out as well as cross-section analysis but the presence of a protein (gelatin or albumen) that would hone in on determining the presence of a photographic process could not be positively determined. As a private conservation practice, West Lake Conservators has limited access to analytical tools and data processing. After taking the analysis as far as possible through the generous collaboration of local institutions and colleagues, it was prescient to offer the private owner of the object an expedite and practical treatment proposal. Cleaning and consolidation treatment were carried out taking into consideration the possibility of an underlying photographic print with a water-sensitive binder. Although the investigation was ultimately inconclusive in positively establishing the presence of a photographic print and although the treatment that was carried out is not innovative, the process of attempting to characterize an object within the constraints of a private practice has value in itself and may add to the knowledge for further research into the this type of composite structure.

Speakers
avatar for Abbott Nixon

Abbott Nixon

Painting Conservation Assistant & Operations Manager, West Lake Conservators
Abbott received her B.A. in Arts Administration from SUNY Fredonia, where she studied the ephemeral performance art. She received her M.A. in Critical Museum Studies in May 2018, where she focused on the museum management and wrote her Master's thesis on the ethics of material degradation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Luisa Casella

Luisa Casella

Photograph Conservator, West Lake Conservators
Luisa has a Masters in conservation from the Instituto Politénico de Tomar, in Portugal. She worked for eight years at Luis Pavão Limitada, serving museums, archives, and cultural institutions. In 2005 Luisa was awarded the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of the Advanced Residency Program... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

4:30pm

(Textiles) Practical Applications of Conservation and Restoration Strategies for Historical Clothing in Uncontrolled Historical Houses
Some Egyptian historic houses are now used as museums, many of which are uncontrolled in their environmental conditions, such as Saad Zaghloul house (House of Nation). Which cause undamaged damage to historical clothing. This research deals with the restoration of the dress of Safia Zaghloul (Wife of Saad Zaghloul) as an example of the condition of historical clothing in historical houses. The dress is two parts the first is outer part and the second is an inner jacket of black color (Industrial dye). The dress was made from silk and cotton fabrics. There are many separate parts and lost pieces in the dress. It was observed that the stitching was separated and it contain stain and dirt. A close examination of the historical Cloth was undertaken in order to develop a plan of conservation treatment such as FTIR, XR-D. In addition, light microscope and SEM were used to identify the kind of fibers, their condition and surface morphology. The effects of cleaning materials on the natural dyes were tested. Fixing and support all the separated parts was done before cleaning. Dry cleaning was used to remove resistance stain and dirt. Mannequins are made with standard and free acidity materials. The manicures were lined and then the dress (the inner part - the outer part) was placed. The missing parts have been completed. The method of exhibition will be discussed. Photographs are included to document the conservation process

Speakers
avatar for Prof Dr. Harby E. Ahmed

Prof Dr. Harby E. Ahmed

Associate Prof of Historical Textiles Conservation., Conservation Dept. Faculty of Archeology, Cairo University, Egypt
Prof Dr. Harby E. Ahmed is Associate Professor Conservation Department- Faculty of Archeology – Cairo University, EGYPT. Furthermore, He is H.D Certified Trainer (Faculty and Leadership Development Center). He has more than 27 articles in international journals. In addition, he... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:00pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Architecture + Archaeological Conservation) Keeping it Vertical: Use of GIS to create a streamlined survey and work order system for a historic landscape
Keeping it Vertical: Use of GIS to create a streamlined survey and work order system for a historic landscape Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery is home to over 200,000 historic monuments and over 7,000 trees throughout its 478 acres. As Green-Wood’s landscape ages and evolves, the need for more technologically advanced collections management software became apparent, a need which resulted in the creation of a unique ArcGIS-based collection management system. In Collector for ArcGIS, management and field crews input survey information such as date, material, dimensions, and conditions of a historic monument or caliper, condition, and taxonomic information of a tree. Managers also create work orders in Collector, which thanks to a first-of-its-kind script which links the two, automates the creation of a work-order in WorkForce for ArcGIS. Work orders are assigned by the Manager, and analytics related to executed work orders and efficiency metrics are reviewed in an Operations Dashboard. The link between Collector and WorkForce allows staff members to geotag work orders to specific trees and monuments while tracking their progress and saving survey information along the way. By utilizing the power of GIS, our software analyzes our landscape’s varied assets simultaneously and streamlines the implementation of the work necessary to maintain those assets, thus offering an enhanced, multi-faceted portrait of Green-Wood. Software such as this could be used across other large historic cemeteries, large archeological sites, city and state park land, throughout museum environments, and scores of other cultural landscapes. This presentation will guide viewers through the inception of the software and its application in the field. Founded in 1838 and now a National Historic Landmark, Green-Wood was one of the first rural cemeteries in America. By the early 1860s, it had earned an international reputation for its magnificent beauty and became the prestigious place to be buried, attracting 500,000 visitors a year, second only to Niagara Falls as the nation’s greatest tourist attraction. Crowds flocked there to enjoy family outings, carriage rides, and sculpture viewing in the finest of first generation American landscapes. Green-Wood’s popularity helped inspire the creation of public parks, including New York City’s Central and Prospect Parks. Green-Wood is 478 spectacular acres of hills, valleys, glacial ponds and paths, throughout which exists one of the largest outdoor collections of 19th- and 20th-century statuary and mausoleums. Four seasons of beauty from century-and-a-half-old trees offer a peaceful oasis to visitors, as well as its 570,000 permanent residents, including Leonard Bernstein, Boss Tweed, Charles Ebbets, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Horace Greeley, Civil War generals, baseball legends, politicians, artists, entertainers and inventors.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Charap

Joseph Charap

Director of Horticulture, Green-Wood Cemetery
Joseph Charap is the Director of Horticulture and Curator at Green-Wood Cemetery, in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from the New York Botanical Garden's School of Professional Horticulture. He is a certified arborist and has a Masters in English Literature from Brooklyn College... Read More →
avatar for Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Neela K. Wickremesinghe

Manager of Restoration and Preservation, Green-Wood Cemetery
Neela K. Wickremesinghe joined the Green-Wood team during fall 2016. Ms. Wickremesinghe holds MS in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation.


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Book and Paper) Looking Back and Taking Stock – A Journey through Past Projects
Since this year’s AIC’s Annual Meeting theme has been expanded for the Book and Paper Group session to include re-evaluation of materials used in historical conservation treatments, the speaker would like to reflect back on more than 30 years of training and working in the conservation field and publically review some cases that provided great anxiety at the time or give pause upon reflection today. He will in fact review his own – by now – historic conservation treatments. The cases range from unintended immediate physical and chemical modifications, to unexpected long-term changes that have an impact on the use of collection items. The speaker will review a number of conservation treatments and evaluate how they have stood the test of time. He will also recount his experience as a conservation student, damaging a 16th century Albrecht Dürer print during a conservation approach that he has since then no longer used. He will discuss his experience with light bleaching a 19th century drawing by Joseph Keppler, an action that created unanticipated chemical changes in the paper. And he will delve into mechanical paper splitting and the unexpected long-term effects of this technique on 19th century US newspapers. The speaker ends with an observation made using Russell-effect photography and wonders whether the wide-spread use of the mat window as storage container should receive closer scrutiny in case in certain circumstances this type of housing unintentionally creates an environment that will give rise to a higher oxidation rate within the confines of the window.

Speakers
avatar for Elmer Eusman-[Fellow]

Elmer Eusman-[Fellow]

Chief, Conservation Division, Library of Congress
Elmer Eusman received his diploma in book and paper conservation in 1989 from the Dutch National School for Conservation, a four-year program now integrated with the University of Amsterdam. After completing his studies, he completed internships in a private conservation studio in... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Collection Care) Vibration testing and wandering of objects in a natural history collection
Studies on the effects of vibrations on the condition of objects of cultural heritage often focus on paintings or unique objects with particular historical value. However, vibrations are also of concern for large collections of objects which serve as (inter)national reference collections. One such collection is the Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, home to the fifth largest natural history collection in the world with over 37 million objects. The storage facilities are physically attached to the museum, offices and laboratories, which are undergoing major renovations. This collection cannot be moved elsewhere, so there are obvious concerns about the effect of vibrations due to heavy construction on the wide variety of objects in the collection. There is virtually no data in the literature on the effect of vibrations on natural history objects. Naturalis and RCE therefore conducted a limited set of vibration tests to obtain an initial impression of what could happen to representative objects under vibration loading. Of particular interest were object resonance, movement on the shelves (“wandering”), and the appearance of damage. The storage situation was simulated by placing objects on typical free-standing metal shelves used in the storage facilities, which were placed unfastened on a commercial vibration testing table. Objects included mounted fauna, small specimen boxes, wood and mineral samples, mounted insects, and bottled biological samples. In order to study the effect of vibrations on the objects alone, they were also tested directly on the vibration table. Testing was conducted at different vibration frequencies and levels. Members of the Naturalis collection care staff visually determined the resonant frequencies and wandering behavior of the objects. The results showed that object vibration behavior depends on a number of factors including their weight, geometry, and mounting, the vibration behavior of the shelves, and characteristics of the object/shelf contact surface. If objects were placed directly on the vibration table, they began to resonate visibly at their resonant frequencies above levels of around 5 mm/s, and began to wander at levels above 20 mm/s. No damage was found for the objects tested for short durations, except for a small loss of particles from a large historical tree branch, and from minerals which lay unpadded on the table. However, vibrations were amplified through the loose standing shelves, reaching levels up to 20 times that of the vibration table itself. This resulted in significant wandering of objects on the shelves, including small specimen boxes falling off of stacks of such boxes. These results indicate that the 2 mm/s low-risk limit suggested by Wei et al (2014) for collections for one construction project would be applicable as a low-risk limit for natural history objects. However, measures would are needed to prevent objects from wandering (see also Smyth et al 2016). Non-reactive padding would help, and would also prevent damage to objects in direct contact with hard shelving materials. Furthermore, monitoring would need to be performed directly on the shelves, as opposed to just on the floor near the shelves.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. W. (Bill) Wei

Dr. W. (Bill) Wei

Senior Conservation Scientist, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
Dr. Wei (1955) is a senior conservation scientist in the Research Department of the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE - Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed). He has a B.S.E. in mechanical engineering from Princeton University (1977) and a Ph.D. in materials science... Read More →

Co-Authors
ED

Esther Dondorp

Collection Manager - Reptiles and Amphibians, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
Ms. Dondorp obtained her Master's of Science in Animal Biology at the University of Leiden in 2010. This included two internships in biology as part of a larger study on the relationship between birds and dinosaurs, where she focused on their common ancestor, the crocodile. The last... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Electronic Media) Time-based Media Art Conservation Education Program at NYU: Concept and Perspectives
In recognition of the emerging field of contemporary art, New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center will expand its course offerings by establishing a specialization explicitly for the conservation of TBM artworks—the first of its kind in this country. This innovative course of studies will require students to cross the disciplinary boundaries of computer science, material science, media technology, engineering, art history, and conservation. The Conservation Center prepares students for careers in technical study and conservation through a four-year graduate program leading to a dual degree – an MA in the History of Art and Archaeology and an MS in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. The program is committed to maintaining its traditional strengths in paper, books, paintings, and objects conservation, while adding TBM as a new specialization. During the curriculum planning phase from 2016-2017, the core competencies and skill sets for future TBM conservators were identified based on meetings with experts from European programs and potential employers and practitioners in the U.S. The learning objectives have been organized to fit into the most suitable teaching formats and built around the best possible time line for acquiring specific skills. As with other specialties within conservation, the core competencies of future TBM conservators are grounded in conservation ethics, conservation methodologies, and conservation science. The conceptual framework of modern and contemporary art conservation alongside modern and contemporary art history and media theory will provide the basis early in the student’s education. Building on that foundation, specifically designed courses will cover topics such as electrics / electronics, computer science / programming, audio / video technology, digital preservation, and photo-chemical processes to develop a solid knowledge of each TBM media category, such as film, slide, video, audio, software, performance, light, kinetic, or internet art. Furthermore, the equipment associated with each media, the signal processing and characteristics of different display and playback devices, needs to be understood in context to assess the visual and aural integrity of a TBM artwork. In addition to the technical competencies, communication skills and the ability to create a network of experts are equally important. To gain physical and intellectual ownership of an artwork, future TBM conservation students will learn and practice how to identify the work-defining properties of an artwork and to understand and document all components in context, which requires close communication with all stakeholders involved. Students will learn how to draw a preservation plan for a TBM collection, which will translate into the general skills needed to promote advocacy for TBM works in an institution, to build and grow a lab, and to establish workflows. This presentation will outline the major steps planned for the education of future TBM art conservators and how this program will augment the body of knowledge in response to the needs of a rapidly growing art conservation discipline. The inaugural class will be launched in the fall of 2018. The development of the TBM art conservation curriculum has been generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Frohnert

Christine Frohnert

Conservator of Modern Materials and Media, Bek & Frohnert LLC, Conservation of Contemporary Art
Christine Frohnert (Graduate degree 2003, Conservation of Modern Materials and Media, University of Arts, Berne, Switzerland) is partner of Bek & Frohnert LLC, Conservation of Contemporary Art, based in New York City since 2012. Previously, Ms. Frohnert served for twelve years as... Read More →
avatar for Hannelore Roemich

Hannelore Roemich

Professor of Conservation Science, NYU Institute of Fine Arts, Conservation Center
Dr. Hannelore Roemich (PhD in Chemistry 1987, University in Heidelberg, Germany; Diploma in Chemistry 1984, University Dortmund, Germany) is Professor of Conservation Science to the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (NYU) since January 2007. Dr. Roemich offers instruction... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Objects) Conditioning Basketry Elements with Water and Ethanol: An Investigation into the Effects of Standard Conservation Methods
Humidification or conditioning of baskets to effect realignment or re-shaping is a standard conservation treatment performed wherever these collections are held. We know that baskets are particularly prone to damage caused by the alternate swelling and shrinking of fibers due to fluctuations in relative humidity. At the same time, this sensitivity has long been used in the conservator’s favor. The chemical composition of cellulose, specifically its ability to form hydrogen bonds, allows for both water and polar solvents to plasticize dried plant tissue. While humidification (or conditioning when using solvents) has become a standard conservation procedure, its effects on material properties have remained only theoretically evaluated rather than through a material study. In fact, untested concerns have been raised over microbial growth, and also the potential for irreversible swelling of the basketry elements. As a result, polar solvents – for example ethanol – have been added to or become a preferred conditioning media instead water. The research for this thesis project, conducted at the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program, revolved around designing an experiment to track the extent of swelling and subsequent recovery of basketry samples treated with water and ethanol vapor. These samples represent two plant species, willow (Salix spp.) and spruce root (Picea spp.), one deciduous and the other coniferous, which occur with some frequency in the basketry traditions of the western United States and Canada. The extent of swelling before and after the conditioning process between all the samples was compared, using measurements taken with a Keyence digital microscope. Pure water, pure ethanol, and three mixtures of the two at different proportions, were each evaluated for consequent dimensional changes occurring before, during, and after conditioning to the same relative humidity as is typically used in conservation treatments. The results of this study not only corroborate information from fields as diverse as conservation, forestry science and material science, but also point towards clear trends which can inform the conservator’s decision-making in planning humidification/conditioning treatments of basketry. By performing a material study, we are able to provide clearer guidelines about the effects of different conditioning solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Hayley Monroe

Hayley Monroe

Master's Student, UCLA/Getty Program for the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Hayley Monroe is a third year student in the UCLA/Getty Master’s Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a BA in Classics. She gained field experience in the conservation of ceramics, metals, glass and... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Ellen Pearlstein-[Fellow]

Professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials
Ellen Pearlstein is a professor and member of the founding faculty in the UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Material, where she teaches graduate classes in the conservation of organic materials, ethics of working with indigenous communities... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Paintings) Evolon: Its Use from a Scientific and Practical Conservation Perspective
In recent years, Evolon®CR, made of a highly absorbent polyester/ polyamide microfilament fabric, has started to be used by many conservators for the removal of varnish layers on paintings. Its potential for controlled solvent application and dramatic reduction of mechanical action is particularly appealing. Moreover, it is especially suited for large-scale paintings. Several case studies about the use of Evolon®CR have been published, but up until now as far as we know, no in-depth scientific study into the behavior of Evolon®CR with solvents for conservation applications has been carried out. In this presentation preliminary results of testing of Evolon®CR will be presented. Moreover, a novel procedure for loading Evolon®CR with solvent for varnish removal will be demonstrated and an illustration given of how physical and visual documentation of varnish removal from the used sheets provide much data for further research on the removed materials using MA-XRF or GCMS.
 
In order to understand how Evolon®CR holds up in solvents, solvent extractions were analysed with Py-GC/MS. No extractables could be determined, however, micro and possible nano-scale-fibers (polyamide (nylon-6) and polyester) were found. From preliminary results of diffusion tests using a mock-up it appears that a fully saturated 'Evolon tissue'  first releases  solvent into the painting after which it reabsorbs it, together with available extractable components in the varnish/ paint (free fatty acids). The rate and depth of diffusion is dependent on the solvent used. This result was shown to be similar??identical to varnish removal using cotton swabs, but has the benefit that no mechanical action is involved.
 
After extensive testing, conservators at Restauratieatelier Amsterdam, developed a simple, but highly effective system of loading the Evolon®CR with specific amounts of solvent. This ensures that only the amount of solvent needed to swell and remove the varnish layer(s) is administered to the painting and that every part of the painting receives exactly the same amount of solvent. After timed trials with small strips of Evolon®CR using varying solvents on various parts of a painting, the most effective solvent at the least concentration for the least amount of time can be determined. The varnish removal can proceed with larger sheets.
During varnish removal, the location of the sheets on a painting can be documented. After evaporation of the solvent, the sheets of Evolon®CR can be scanned at high resolution and stitched to form a mosaic of Evolon®CR corresponding to the painting. Remarkably, areas of thicker varnish, retouching and fine details, such as the crack pattern of the paint can be observed in the used sheets. In order to get a better understanding the used sheets were scanned with a Bruker macro-XRF scanner. These results, along with those of other tests will be presented.
It can be concluded, that although further research is warranted, the application of solvent using the above method and Evolon®CR  makes varnish removal more efficient and controlled in comparison with varnish removal with swabs. Moreover, the used sheets of Evolon®CR provide an invaluable record of the removed varnish and retouching.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Smelt

Susan Smelt

Junior Paintings Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Susan Smelt is a junior paintings conservator at the Rijksmuseum. She graduated in 2012 from the University of Amsterdam with an MA and Professional Doctorate in Conservation and Restoration of Paintings. During the two-year postinitial phase she worked at the Stichting Restauratie... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Robert Erdmann

Robert Erdmann

Senior Research Scientist, Rijksmuseum
With the latest techniques in the field of computer vision, machine learning, image processing, materials science and visualization theory Erdmann works to preserve, understand and make accessible visual artistic heritage. He is currently a Senior Scientist at the Rijksmuseum. Also... Read More →
avatar for Henk van Keulen

Henk van Keulen

Specialist Conservation and Restoration, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
avatar for Katrien Keune

Katrien Keune

research scientist/associate professor, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam/University of Amsterdam
Katrien Keune is research scientist at the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. She also holds an appointment as Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and contributes to the Netherlands Institute for Conservation, Art and Science (NICAS) at a scientific... Read More →
avatar for Kathrin Kirsch

Kathrin Kirsch

Conservator of paintings and modern artworks, Restauratieatelier Amsterdam
Kathrin completed her degree at the University of Applied Sciences in Cologne in 2000, specializing in the restoration of paintings and sculpture. During her 5-year program, she completed a six-month internship at SKRA in 1997 (Stichting Kollektief Restauratieatelier Amsterdam) in... Read More →
avatar for Petria Noble

Petria Noble

Head of Paintings Conservation, Rijksmuseum
As Head of Paintings Conservation at the Rijksmuseum since 2014, Petria has expanded the department, laying more emphasis on research into the materials and techniques of artists' as well as those of conservation. Originally from Australia, Petria Noble carried out her post-graduate... Read More →
avatar for Andreas Siejek

Andreas Siejek

Painting Conservator, Restauratieatelier Amsterdam
Andreas Siejek is net als zijn collega Kathrin Kirsch afgestudeerd aan de University of Applied Sciences in Keulen als Diplom-restaurator voor schilderijen en geploychromeerde sculptuur. Andreas heeft jarenlange ervaring als zelfstandig restaurator. Hij werkte voor onder meer het... Read More →
avatar for Saskia Smulders

Saskia Smulders

Conservation Scientist, Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed
Saskia Smulders - de Jong is a conservation scientist at the Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed (Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands). After 7 years working as a biochemical and pathological laboratory analyst, Saskia Smulders - de Jong completed a Master's degree in Conservation... Read More →
avatar for Gwen Tauber

Gwen Tauber

Senior Paintings Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Gwen Tauber has been a painting conservator in the Rijks Museum since 1990 and is primarily concerned with the treatment of paintings, their examination and treatment documentation. She works in the midst of an interdisciplinary team comprised of conservators, scientists and curators... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Photographic Materials) How to Receive and Organize a Collection of 1 Million Photographs at Once? Material and Metadata Discussions
All over the world for decades, newspapers and journalist groups have formed huge collections of photographs and clippings. This presentation aims to analyze the strategies used and projected to describe the photographic collection of the Jornal do Commercio (Comercy newspaper). When this newspaper was closed in 2016 it has been the longest paper in activity in South America; in the same year, Instituto Moreira Salles, a cultural institute that stores documental collections, bought the collection of photographs that was gathered by this newspaper. Over 70 years the newspaper collected around 1 million photographs, 700,000 photos, and 300,000 negatives, most of them about Brazil. These pictures were stored in file folders that received a thematic title in order to organize the photos in series. Much information about the pictures was registered on the back part; it’s possible to identify information such as date, place, photographer, newspaper where it was published and sometimes the full article. In order to catalog this collection, from the hugest series to each photograph, it was necessary to identify ways to transcript all the available data. The 1 million photographs were kept in around 1900 boxes; each of them contained 2 to 120 cardboard files; in the top of these files there is a title that informs which kind of pictures are in the files. In the original organization the collection was divided in two huge series, subjects and personalities; those series were divided into thousands of smaller series. The first tool used was a penscanner that can scan digitized texts and apply OCR, but this scanner wasn’t useful and precise in the old cardboard files, because there was no contrast. This pen only has good results in white paper. Then the team started to use a voice recognition software available in any Macintosh operational system. This software, used in Portuguese, reached high levels of precision and helped to make the process of description of the series very quickly. This software couldn’t be used in the personality series, because it only works in one kind of idiom, so the team is taking pictures of the cardboard files in order to apply OCR. The digital capture of useful informations for cataloguing and to describe this collection is a strategy to register the documents of the collection in a fast and accurate way. It’s also a conservation initiative, because it avoids information and documents disassociation. This set of actions have an important role to insert the cataloguing data in international standard like Dublin Core, Lido and ISAD(G). In addition discussions related to thesaurus, folksonomy and automatic indexing are equally relevant for this works and strategical group of actions. 

Speakers
avatar for Rodrigo Bozzetti

Rodrigo Bozzetti

Registrar / Historian, Instituto Moreira Salles
Graduated in Library Science in 2012, by the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro state. Master degree in Information Science in 2016 by the Brazilian Institute of Information in science and Technology, where I developed an epistemological study about the concept of document. Since... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:00pm

(Research and Technical Studies + Textiles) Roundtable Discussion
When TSG and RATS began planning a joint session for the 2018 annual meeting, we met with some resistance because AIC records suggested that there were no individuals who were members of both specialty groups.  We've learned since that this is both not true (two of our panelists are members of both) and it's definitely not the case that no one in TSG is doing research, nor because no conservation scientists are interested in textiles. But how can we increase the interactions and strengthen ties between our two groups? 

In this panel discussion you will hear from a conservator in a major museum, a current professor, a retired professor and a conservator in private practice. Each will bring a different approach to this topic and offer advice and anecdotes on how they bridge the gap between research and textiles in their profession. Topics of discussion will include: what makes for a good and successful research project? Do all projects have to involve big questions and fancy scientific equipment?  How can keeping an open mind, and questioning assumptions lead to new discoveries?   What makes projects work?  What makes projects not work?  We hope that this panel will help our communities forge connections, learn from successes and failures and encourage each other.  Audience participation in the form of an open question and answer session will follow.
Panelists:
  • Dr. Margaret Ordoñez, Professor Emerita, Textiles, Fashion Merchandising, and Design, University of Rhode Island; Conservator, Ordoñez Textile Conservation Services, Camden, TN
  • Mary W. Ballard, Museum Conservation Institute, Smithsonian Institution, Senior Textiles Conservator, Suitland, Maryland
  • Gwen Spicer, Spicer Art Conservation, LLC
  • Dr. Nancy Odegaard, Conservator, Head of Preservation Division, Arizona State Museum; Professor, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, School of Anthropology, American Indian Studies GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

Speakers
avatar for Mary W. Ballard

Mary W. Ballard

Senior Textiles Conservator, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
MARY W. BALLARD Senior Textiles Conservator at the Smithsonian’s Museum Conservation Institute, helped organize multiple sessions with the late Dr. Helmut Schweppe on dyeing and dye analysis of natural and early synthetic dyes. A recent research interest has been the effect of LED... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Nancy Odegaard-[Fellow]

Dr. Nancy Odegaard-[Fellow]

Conservator, Head of Preservation Division, Arizona State Museum; Professor, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, School of Anthropology, American Indian Studies GIDP, University of Arizona, University of Arizona
NANCY ODEGAARD PhD, FAIC, FIIC is Conservator and Head of the Preservation Division at the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. She is also a Professor in the Materials Science & Engineering Department, School of Anthropology, and Drachman Institute at the University of Arizona... Read More →
avatar for Margaret Ordoñez

Margaret Ordoñez

Professor Emeritus, University of Rhode Island
Taught textile conservation classes in the graduate programs at Kansas State University and the University of Rhode Island; retired from URI in 2017 and set up Tenasi Textile Conservation Services in Tennessee. MS and PhD in textiles and clothing departments at the University of Tennessee... Read More →
avatar for Gwen Spicer-[Fellow]

Gwen Spicer-[Fellow]

Conservator, Spicer Art Conservation, LLC
Gwen Spicer is a textile, upholstery and objects conservator in private practice. She earned her MA in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College, and has since taught and lectured around the world. In her twenty years in private practice, she assists many individuals and organizations... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:30pm

(Private Practice) Conservators in Private Practice Group Business Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Objects Conservator, The Found Object Art Conservation
Kerith Koss Schrager is an Objects Conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation. She has worked with institutions such as Historic Hudson Valley, Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Freer|Sackler Galleries (Smithsonian Institution), Field Museum, and Shelburne... Read More →

Thursday May 31, 2018 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Westchase Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

5:45pm

Pre-Objects and Architecture Reception Tour of the Heritage Society
Join us for a one hour tour at the Heritage Society before the OSG/ASG Reception on May 31. You will have the opportunity to view The Yates House and the 4th Ward Cottage. These properties will not be open during the reception. You will also be the first to arrive at the reception!   

The 1870 Yates House was originally located at 1318 Andrews Street in Freedmen's Town. The simplified Greek Revival home was built by the Reverend John Henry Yates, an emancipated slave who later served as the minister for Antioch Baptist Church and founder of Bethel Baptist Church. He also helped to organize the Houston Academy in 1894. Construction of this house a mere five years after Emancipation illustrates the indomitable spirit of a formerly enslaved population that was transitioning into a free society in Houston. 

This 19th-century cottage was previously located at 809 Robin Street in Houston’s Fourth Ward.  It was home to a German immigrant family in the middle of the 19th century before serving as a rental house for more than a century (1883 to 2001). By the turn of the 20th century it was part of the thriving African American neighborhood known as “Freedmen’s Town” which served as a major hub for black education, business, and culture after Emancipation.

Thursday May 31, 2018 5:45pm - 7:00pm
Heritage Society 1100 Bagby St, Houston, TX 77002

6:30pm

Book and Paper Group Reception
The Morian Hall of Paleontology is your back drop as you enjoy excellent food and drink and the opportunity to mingle with your fellow book and paper conservators. Embark on a Prehistoric Safari in one of the nation's top paleontology exhibits.  

Sponsors
avatar for Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.

Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.

Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc.
Hollinger Metal Edge, Inc. has been the leading supplier of archival storageproducts for Conservators, Museums, Government and Institutional Archives,Historical Societies, Libraries, Universities, Galleries and Private Collectors forover 65 years. Famous for The Hollinger Box... Read More →
avatar for Polygon

Polygon

Polygon
Polygon uses state-of-the-art vacuum freeze-drying chambers that use negativepressure to create the most effective drying solution for certain materials andprojects like paper, books, blueprints, x-rays, and film restoration. We also offeradditional services such as copying and secured... Read More →
avatar for Sirma Americas

Sirma Americas

Sirma Americas
MuseumSpace is a comprehensive Museum Management Software Suite. Use the platform’s semantic functionalities to organize records, gather cultural objects, plan and manage upcoming exhibitions, work with crucial documents, simplify image management, create reports, and more. MuseumSpace... Read More →
avatar for University Products, Inc.

University Products, Inc.

University Products, Inc.
University Products is the leading international supplier of conservation tools and equipment, as well as archival storage products. The company distributes products directly to dozens of countries around the world as well as through our many partners throughout Europe, Asia, South... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Houston Natural Science Museum 5555 Hermann Park Dr, Houston,TX 77030

6:30pm

Electronic Media Group Networking Reception
Note: we are holding the ticketed Specialty Receptions on 5/31 and the All-Attendee reception (formerly know as the Opening Reception) on 6/1 due to the late hours of the MFAH.

Sponsor a student ticket! Click here.

Sponsors
avatar for Live Oak Friends Meeting House

Live Oak Friends Meeting House

Our Quaker group began in the mid-1950s as a handful of seekers who met for evening worship at a private home.  Later, as we grew in number, “home” moved eight more times, until we decided to buy a modest, blue-painted frame house with its own small garage apartment in the Heights.Our... Read More →



Thursday May 31, 2018 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Live Oak Friends Meeting House 1318 W 26th St, Houston, TX 77008

6:30pm

RATS/TSG/WAG Reception
Join us at Project Row Houses in Houston's historic Third Ward for this joint and eclectic reception. Gather for food and drink in the historic Eldorado Ballroom. View local art exhibitions, tour the models of redesigned affordable housing that helps fosters community.

Sponsor a student ticket! Click here.

Sponsors
avatar for Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc.

Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc.

Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc.
Dorfman Museum Figures, Inc. has been serving the museum community for over 50 years. Originally specializing in creating life-size lifelike figures for museums, Dorfman has sculpted the likenesses of over 800 people and created over 5,000 realistic figures for museums, visitor centers... Read More →
avatar for Project Row Houses

Project Row Houses

Project Row Houses occupies a significant footprint in Houston’s Historic Third Ward, one of the city’s oldest African-American neighborhoods. The site encompasses five city blocks and houses 39 structures that serve as home base to a variety of community enriching initiatives... Read More →
avatar for T and D US, LLC

T and D US, LLC

T and D US, LLC
T&D Corporation manufactures a complete line of wireless and stand-alone Data Loggers offering a variety of web based data collection, remote monitoring and notification features.  Wireless data collection options include an innovative hand-held portable unit with graphical display... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Project Row Houses 2521 Holman St, Houston, TX 77004

7:00pm

Paintings Group Reception
The stunning Menil collection will be the location for the paintings reception. The Twombly Gallery will be open for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy food and drink, while you reconnect and network with your peers.

Note: we are holding the ticketed Specialty Receptions on 5/31 and the All-Attendee reception (formerly know as the Opening Reception) on 6/1 due to the late hours of the MFAH.

Sponsor a student ticket! Click here.

Sponsors
avatar for Atlas Preservation Inc.

Atlas Preservation Inc.

Atlas Preservation
Atlas Preservation was conceived based on the need for a one stop source for all monument restoration supplies. Our mission quickly expanded to include many other fields relating to conservation & historic preservation. such as products for metal conservation, historic window repair... Read More →
avatar for Kremer Pigments Inc.

Kremer Pigments Inc.

Kremer Pigments Inc.
KREMER PIGMENTS has been discovering and redeveloping historical pigments and mediums since 1977. Our professional assortment consists of over 100 different mineral pigments made from precious and semiprecious stones, which we offer in various grinds and qualities, over 70 natural... Read More →



Thursday May 31, 2018 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Menil Collection 1533 Sul Ross St, Houston, TX 77006

7:00pm

Objects and Architecture Reception
Celebrate the historical architecture and objects that build Houston - gather on Connally Plaza in the heart of modern Houston surrounded by some of Houston's oldest buildings. We will have access to the museum and the interiors of some of the historic buildings. Enjoy food and drink from Pappasitos Catering - a Houston tradition. We are attempting to arrange a pre-reception viewing time as well. Note we are holding the ticketed Specialty Receptions on 5/31 and the All-Attendee reception( formerly know as the Opening Reception) on 6/1 due to the late hours of the MFAH.

Sponsors
avatar for Bruker Corporation

Bruker Corporation

Bruker Corporation
Bruker is one of the world’s leading analytical instrumentation companies. We cover a broad spectrum of advanced solutions in all fields of research and development. Bruker’s innovative methods and non-destructive analytical techniques help to protect and preserve artifacts and... Read More →
avatar for GC Laser Systems

GC Laser Systems

GC Laser Systems
G.C. Laser Systems Inc. designs and builds unique laser systems specifically for art and architecture conservation.  Our compact and portable systems, such as the GC-1, offer unmatched precision and control over the level of cleaning.  We also offer custom built laser cleaning solutions... Read More →
avatar for Heritage Society

Heritage Society

The Heritage Society (THS) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to tell the stories of the diverse history of Houston and Texas through collections, exhibits, educational programs, film, video, and other content. Founded in 1954 by a number of public-spirited Houstonians... Read More →
avatar for Sirma Americas

Sirma Americas

Sirma Americas
MuseumSpace is a comprehensive Museum Management Software Suite. Use the platform’s semantic functionalities to organize records, gather cultural objects, plan and manage upcoming exhibitions, work with crucial documents, simplify image management, create reports, and more. MuseumSpace... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Heritage Society 1100 Bagby St, Houston, TX 77002

9:00pm

UPenn Night Cap
Thursday May 31, 2018 9:00pm - 10:00pm
MKT Bar 1001 Austin St, Houston, TX 77010

9:00pm

 
Friday, June 1
 

7:30am

(Book and Paper) Book and Paper Group Business Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Whitney Baker-[PA]

Whitney Baker-[PA]

Head of Conservation, University of Kansas Libraries
Whitney Baker is Head of Conservation Services at the University of Kansas Libraries, where she has worked since 2002. Since 2004 she has taught the preventive conservation class in the graduate program in Museum Studies at the University of Kansas. She holds an MLIS and Advanced... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

7:30am

(Electronic Media) Electronic Media Group Reception
Moderators
avatar for Crystal Sanchez

Crystal Sanchez

Video and Digital Preservation Specialist, Smithsonian Institution, OCIO, DAMS
Crystal Sanchez is a media archivist at the Smithsonian Institution on the Digital Asset Management System (DAMS), working to preserve and provide access to digital collections from across the Smithsonian’s diverse Museums, Archives, Libraries, Research Centers, and the Zoo. She... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

7:30am

(Objects) Objects Specialty Group Business Meeting with a Light Breakfast
Moderators
avatar for Anthony Sigel

Anthony Sigel

Senior Conservator of Objects and Sculpture, Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies
Tony Sigel is conservator of objects and sculpture at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard Art Museums, and is responsible for the treatment of sculpture and three dimensional objects of all materials from pre-history to post-modern. He was trained through... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

7:30am

(Paintings) Paintings Specialty Group Business Meeting
Speakers
avatar for Noelle Ocon-[PA]

Noelle Ocon-[PA]

Conservator, North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation
Noelle Ocon has served as the conservator of paintings at the North Carolina Museum of Art since 1997. Ocon’s focus is on the examination, documentation and conservation of the 17th century Dutch and Flemish collection, as well as the implementation of technology, including infrared... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

7:30am

(Textiles) Textiles Specialty Group Business Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Laura Mina-[PA]

Laura Mina-[PA]

Head of Textile Conservation, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
Laura Mina received her MA in fashion and textile studies from the Fashion Institute of Technology, and her BS in performance studies from Northwestern University. Before joining The Met, Laura worked with the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Smithsonian Institution.

Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

8:00am

(Photographic Materials) Photographic Materials Group Business Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Barbara Lemmen-[Fellow]

Barbara Lemmen-[Fellow]

Senior Photograph Conservator, Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
Barbara Lemmen is Senior Photograph Conservator. She earned her BA in Art History and Chemistry from Williams College, and an MS from the Winterthur Museum/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation (WUDPAC). Since 2002, she has been affiliated assistant faculty at the University... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Architecture) The development of modern organic materials, 1845-1930
Up to the middle of the nineteenth century, the “liquid-to-solid” organic materials that serve as architectural paints, coatings and adhesives represented the chemistry of natural products. The sources of raw materials were varied, including drying oils, tree resins, and animal and fish glues, but commercial users wanted products with greater ease of use, and better (and more consistent) performance. The earliest of these improved materials involved relatively simple modification of natural products, with industrial-scale experimentation giving us vulcanized rubber and cellulose nitrate. Improvements in the production of coal and oil distillates, and in the structural study of organic molecules, led to the first generation of phenolic resins and butadiene rubber in the early twentieth century. By 1930, many familiar materials—such as alkyd resins, PVC and Nylon 66—were starting to enter the marketplace. They set the stage for a broader revolution in polymer science that dramatically changed the work of architects, engineers and builders in the decades that followed.

Speakers
avatar for Norman Weiss-[Fellow]

Norman Weiss-[Fellow]

Associate Professor, Columbia University
Norman R. Weiss is recognized for more than fifty years of scientific work with historic structures. He has taught at Columbia University since 1977. Prof. Weiss is a fellow of the Association for Preservation Technology, Vice President of MCC Materials, and Director of Scientific... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Book and Paper) Small but bulky: a study on the rebinding of a portable 15th century book of hours
Book conservation treatment rarely calls for the full rebinding of a book. Where possible, conservators preserve the material nature of a book by keeping its original components and performing minimal intervention. At times, more interventive treatments are necessary to prepare the book for safe handling. HRC 10, a 15th-century Flemish book of hours from the Ransom Center’s Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Collection, presents a case-study where rebinding became essential, allowing an in-depth examination into combinations of different binding components suitable for small, bulky manuscript formats. Prior to treatment at the Ransom Center, HRC 10 was in a 19th-century stiff board, laced-in binding sewn on recessed cords. While the manuscript is small enough to fit into the palm of a user’s hands, its 226-folio text block makes the volume very thick. The opening of the volume’s parchment leaves was restricted by the binding and the text block’s heavily lined spine. To access the book’s contents, users had to exert pressure to open the text block, often with their fingers touching the fragile illuminations and writing that is close to the edges of the pages. As the manuscript is often studied for its illuminations, curators and conservators determined that treatment was necessary to increase the openability of the text block. Multiple conservators worked on HRC 10 over the course of its treatment, and the treatment plan changed greatly from its initial development to completion. When a decision to resew and rebind a text block is made, conservators usually attempt to create a new binding structure that is sympathetic to the period of the text block. For HRC 10, this would have meant resewing on raised supports. While this is a strong sewing structure, it is not optimal for small, bulky text blocks, where the sewing supports tend to restrict the movement of the spine. Resewing HRC 10 in such a structure were therefore not successful in increasing the openability of the volume. Several models with various sewing structures were made to determine the best structure for HRC 10, using different combinations of components such as sewing style, sewing support materials, lining materials and methods of attachment, and endbands. An unsupported link stitch, similar to the sewing used for earlier Byzantine and Coptic bindings, was finally selected. It greatly improved the openability. The binding was then covered in an alum-tawed skin, a conservationally-sound material. The treatment project of HRC 10 presented an opportunity to trace the thought-process of different conservators throughout the treatment of one manuscript, culminating in an in-depth examination of the structural complications of working with small, bulky text blocks to provide a satisfactory treatment solution.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Kwan

Kimberly Kwan

Bollinger Conservation Fellow, Harry Ransom Center
Kimberly Kwan is the Bollinger Conservation Fellow, Book Lab at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. She received her MA in Conservation at Camberwell College of Arts, London, UK with a specialization in books and archival materials. Prior to working at the Ransom... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) Facial Reconstruction of Ancient Egyptian Mummies: Experiences from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Poised at the intersection of science and art, the field of facial reconstruction offers an unprecedented way to approach the ancient dead as human beings who “look like us.” This paper discusses issues precipitated by the digital reconstruction of the faces of two ancient Egyptians stewarded by the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, and considers how new scientific technologies as well as ethical concerns complicate attempts to render human remains more recognizably human. The interdisciplinary nature of this project required developing a new framework for respectful practices for the preservation and presentation of human remains, particularly as there were many perspectives involved; in the case of this research, this included the combined expertise and insights of forensic artists and anthropologists, a facial prosthetist, radiologists, biomedical engineers, digital imaging specialists, Egyptologists, graduate and undergraduate students, as well as an art conservator. Focusing on two ancient Egyptian individuals who have been closely associated with the history of Baltimore, and Johns Hopkins University, its hospital and its Archaeological Museum since the early twentieth century, this paper highlights the many unexpected types of documentation that were required to more fully understand the “object biographies” of these two individuals. From their acquisitions to early autopsies, to past conservation treatments, recent computed tomography scanning and digital reconstruction as well as multi-band imaging of associated objects, the kinds of data, and expertise required to decode these new kinds of data, has raised questions about how we affect a more holistic stewardship of human remains. The paper will also consider how the final digital depictions were contextualized and interpreted for a broader audience through student documentation and student-designed public programming in order to invite the museum visitor and the public to have a role in ensuring a respectful stewardship of the people of the past.

Speakers
avatar for Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Sanchita Balachandran-[Fellow]

Associate Director/Conservator, Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Sanchita Balachandran is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She teaches courses related to the technical study and analysis of ancient objects, as... Read More →

Co-Authors
JG

Juan Garcia

Student, Ridgely Middle School
avatar for Mark Roughley

Mark Roughley

Research and Teaching Assistant, Liverpool John Moores University
Mark is a trained Medical Artist and his 3D modelling, CGI texturing and animation skills, alongside knowledge of CT data reconstruction practice, 3D scanning and 3D printing are used to aid in Craniofacial Reconstruction and for presentation to public audiences.
avatar for Kathryn Smith

Kathryn Smith

PhD researcher, Face Lab
Craniofacial identification and depiction (forensic and archaeological) | visual art and curatorship | Ethics of display
avatar for Meg Swaney

Meg Swaney

PhD Student, Egyptian Art & Archaeology, Johns Hopkins University
Meg Swaney is a PhD student in Egyptian Art & Archaeology and a Graduate Student Museum Supervisor at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. She she does osteological work at the JHU Mut Temple expedition, and her dissertation focuses on the art history of the temple of Ptolemy... Read More →
avatar for Caroline Wilkinson

Caroline Wilkinson

Director, Liverpool School of Art & Design
Craniofacial identification and forensic art

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Paintings) The Blues of Jan de Bray's Judith and Holofernes: the technical study of two blue pigments and its impact on treatment
This paper will present the examination, analysis, and treatment of a seventeenth-century oil on panel painting in the collection of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The painting depicts Judith and Holofernes and was painted in 1659 by Jan de Bray, a Haarlem-based history and portrait painter. The painting was brought to the conservation department for examination and treatment in the summer of 2016. Although initial stages of the treatment were straightforward, the removal of many layers of discolored natural resin varnish revealed an unusual and confusing pattern of damage in the blue area of the bedspread. Extensive abrasions, some round and ring-shaped, were visible with the naked eye, and the presence of microscopic islands of whitish material suggested that either pigment discoloration or undesirable pigment-binder interactions had occurred. To more fully understand the damage and alterations, the blue area was subjected to intensive study. Non-invasive analytical and imaging techniques, in addition to micro-sample analysis, were employed, including infrared reflectography (IRR), Hirox digital microphotography, micro Reflectance Transformation Imaging (micro-RTI), cross-sectional analysis, macro X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (MA-XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-BSE/EDS), Ultra High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Photo Diode Array (UHPLC-PDA), and portable micro-Raman spectroscopy (pRaman) and X-Ray Diffractometry (pXRD). Two different blue pigments were identified: indigo was used in the first blue layer of the bedspread with lapis lazuli glazed on top. The whitish islands were characterized as lapis lazuli that were apparently degraded in the past. The authors propose a possible mechanism for the degradation of the lapis lazuli based on SEM-EDS data showing reduced levels of sulfur in the degraded areas. These data are then correlated with observations of the painting’s condition as well as with another recent publication of a painting by Hieronymus Bosch (Genbrugge 2016). Another significant finding includes the presence of alum in the indigo, which may explain the light blue fluorescence of the dark blue indigo paint under UV illumination. Consultation of contemporary source material provides additional context for the use of ultramarine and indigo pigments in seventeenth-century Dutch paintings. Ultimately, a more complete understanding of the materials present in the blue area and the ways in which later alterations to these pigments have affected the overall appearance of the painting informed the inpainting stage of treatment. This treatment step is discussed in light of these findings.

Speakers
avatar for Gerrit Albertson

Gerrit Albertson

Conservator, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fairchild Center for Paintings Conservation
Gerrit Albertson is currently the Annette de la Renta Fellow in Paintings Conservation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, working under the supervision of Michael Gallagher and Dorothy Mahon. A 2017 graduate from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Yoshinari Abe

Dr. Yoshinari Abe

Lector, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science
Dr. Yoshinari Abe is Lector of analytical and inorganic chemistry at Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science. He received a Ph. D. degree in chemistry from Tokyo University of Science in 2012 for studies in scientific investigation of blue colorants and pigments... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Art Proaño Gaibor

Dr. Art Proaño Gaibor

Materials Scientist - Specialist in Conservation and Restoration, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE)
Art Proaño Gaibor is a Specialist in Conservation and Restoration at the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands since 2017. He has a degree from the ROC chemistry school of Amsterdam since 2008. He is specialized in the analysis of organic colorants in textiles, synthetic colorants... Read More →
avatar for Anna Krekeler

Anna Krekeler

Paintings Conservator, Rijksmuseum
Anna Krekeler was trained as a paintings conservator at the University of Fine Arts in Dresden, Germany. Since her graduation in 2007, she has been working in the Rijksmuseum’s Painting Conservation Studio. Her main research interest is in the techniques and materials of artists... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Annelies van Loon

Dr. Annelies van Loon

Paintings Research Scientist, Rijksmuseum
Annelies van Loon is a paintings research scientist both at the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) and the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis (The Hague). She received a master’s degree in chemistry, a post-doctoral diploma in the conservation of easel paintings from the Limburg Conservation... Read More →
avatar for Petria Noble

Petria Noble

Head of Paintings Conservation, Rijksmuseum
As Head of Paintings Conservation at the Rijksmuseum since 2014, Petria has expanded the department, laying more emphasis on research into the materials and techniques of artists' as well as those of conservation. Originally from Australia, Petria Noble carried out her post-graduate... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston
  • Specialty Tracks Paintings
  • Cost Type Included with registration
  • Abstract ID 13355
  • Authors (in order) Gerrit Albertson, Anna Krekeler, Dr. Annelies van Loon, Dr. Art Proaño Gaibor, Dr. Yoshinari Abe

8:30am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) All that Glitters: Visualizing and Characterizing Gold Leaf through Macro-XRF Scanning
The application of gold leaf is ubiquitous in late medieval painting, but our knowledge of how it was applied is based largely on historical treatises and modern practice. Analytical techniques traditionally applied to the study of historic works of art, such as X-radiography and point-analysis x-ray fluorescence (XRF), identify only the presence and elemental composition of the metal leaf at a single point, respectively. MA-XRF scanning has opened up a new avenue of research into the study of gilding materials and techniques by providing unprecedented new insight into visualizing the dimensions of individual gold leaves, differences in how the leaf was applied by various artists and workshops, and the variability of gold leaf alloy compositions available. In addition to elucidating the original artistic creative process, MA-XRF can identify and map restoration interventions using gold leaf, thereby providing new documentation of historic conservation or restoration efforts. Statistical measurement of the dimensions of individual gold leaves provides a new tool for supporting or refuting links between separated components of altarpieces. This poster presents the results of studies from a number of paintings and manuscript illuminations that demonstrate the ability of MA-XRF to elucidate new information about the composition of metal leaf, its application, and its past conservation.

Speakers
avatar for Douglas MacLennan

Douglas MacLennan

Research Lab Associate, Getty Conservation Institute
Douglas MacLennan joined the Technical Studies research laboratory at the Getty Conservation Institute in 2016. His work focuses on the technical examination of works of art in collaboration with both conservators and curators. His research interests include the use of XRF and multispectral... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nathan Daly

Nathan Daly

Postdoctoral Fellow, Getty Conservation Institute
avatar for Arlen Heginbotham

Arlen Heginbotham

Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture, J. Paul Getty Museum
Arlen Heginbotham received his A.B. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and his M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College. He is currently Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Arlen’s research interests include the history... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Lee

Lynn Lee

Assistant Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Lynn Lee received her PhD in physical chemistry from the University of California Berkeley. Her current areas of research include the study of traditional—especially those used in antiquities—and modern artist materials and techniques using non- or minimally invasive analytical... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Schmidt Patterson

Catherine Schmidt Patterson

Associate Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Catherine Schmidt Patterson received her PhD in physical chemistry at Northwestern University. Her primary areas of research are the use of non- or minimally invasive techniques such as Raman microspectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, technical imaging to study works of art... Read More →
avatar for Yvonne Szafran

Yvonne Szafran

Senior Conservator, J Paul Getty Museum
avatar for Karen Trentelman

Karen Trentelman

Senior Scientist, Getty Conservation Institute
Karen Trentelman is head of Technical Studies research, which focuses on the scientific study of works of art to further the understanding and preservation of these works in collaboration with conservators and curators. Current areas of interest include: revealing hidden layers in paintings and manuscripts using noninvasive spectro... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Turner

Nancy Turner

Conservator, J. Paul Getty Museum

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Textiles) A Lot of Nitpicking; Documentation of Tom Welter’s painted silk battle flag encapsulation method and materials.
Reconsidering the history of conservation is not solely about how things have been treated. Instead, by examining the decision-making process, which forms and informs future conservation treatments, we can gain context to fully understand and assess previous work. Tom Welter began to develop a method to encapsulate fragile silk battle flags in 1964 after a 3 day tutorial with conservator Katherine Scott. While Welter was very talented as an artist and mechanic he had no prior experience in textile conservation. The encapsulation treatment he developed, while invasive by today’s standard, was performed on more than 200 painted silk battle flags throughout the country. Innovative in application Welter’s ultimate goal of treatment was not just to consolidate but to make the flags available for use. Within this paper, a detailed documentation of the procedure developed by Welter will be revealed. Materials such as surfactants and adhesives will be identified. All information documenting the treatment procedure will be based on; Welter’s personal journal entries, written treatment documentation, physical evidence, and an oral history provided by his daughter Nancy Cyr. It is hoped that by documenting Welter’s encapsulation method, conservators and curators will be better informed to preserve these fragile silk battle flags.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Frisina

Ann Frisina

Conservator, Minnesota Historical Society
Ann Frisina began her career at the Textile Conservation Workshop in 1989 where she spent three years under the guidance of Senior Conservator, Karen Clark. While at T.C.W. her work focused on flat 2-dimensional textiles ranging in sizes from small samplers, to larger quilts. Moving... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

8:30am

(Collection Care) Materials Selection for Storage, Exhibit, & Transport: A Moderated Panel Discussion
It is an acknowledged truth in the field of preventive conservation that materials selected for storage, exhibit, and transport of collections play a critical role in the long-term preservation of these same collections. The wrong materials—those selected without careful consideration or those selected based on flawed assumptions (e.g. one batch of material varies in composition from another)—can impact the overall stability of collections, promote damage to collection items, or result in material failure. Selecting an appropriate material can be fraught with challenges: What are the specific properties necessary for the task? How can these properties be evaluated to relate to material performance and overall task compatibility? How can communication with industry result in a supply of consistent material? Nevertheless, collection care professionals must regularly select materials for purpose amid these challenges, which can leave the professional feeling like their best efforts still rely on guesswork, qualitative evaluation, and inconsistent results. 
To begin unraveling this complex issue and begin developing solutions, a working group (Materials for Collection Care Working Group) consisting of the various stakeholders engaged in material development, testing, and selection is underway. This group is currently engaged in identifying the current challenges with materials selection and evaluation and more clearly defining the stakeholders and their roles. From there, the group will develop a resource for advancing the community’s ability to take a more educated role in material development, selection, evaluation, and use. 
A moderated panel focused on improving awareness of materials, their components, and the testing required for their use in collection care will consist of: 
1. A Standards professional representing an organization that develops community-tested standards, such as ASTM. This person will address how standards are developed, resources needed for their development, and community expectations: Michael Skalka, National Gallery of Art and ASTM Chairman of DOI.57 Artist Materials
2. A Conservation Scientist to present the complexities of material testing: Eric Breitung, The Metropolitan Museum of Art 
3. A Conservator experienced in developing specifications for products: Andrew Robb, Library of Congress 
4. A Supplier discussing the challenges of working with manufacturers and consistency of materials: John Dunphy, University Products 
5. An Exhibit Designer discussing the challenges of working with collection care professionals and materials suppliers and manufacturers to develop in-budget exhibitions with a collection care priority: Tomomi Itakura, Fine Art Museums of San Francisco 
Through presentations and moderated discussions, continuing steps for the working group will be identified and prioritized. Each panelist will be given 10 minutes to speak, followed by 30 minutes for guided discussion and questions. 

Moderators
avatar for Pamela Hatchfield-[Fellow]

Pamela Hatchfield-[Fellow]

Head of Objects Conservation, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Pamela Hatchfield is the Robert P. and Carol T. Henderson Head of Objects Conservation at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She received her Master’s degree in Art History and Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, with an advanced... Read More →
avatar for Catharine Hawks-[PA]

Catharine Hawks-[PA]

Collections Program Conservator, Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of Natural History
Catharine Hawks is an objects conservator with a focus on natural history collections. Before becoming the museum conservator for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), she was in private practice for 20 years, working with over 100 institutional clients in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Eric Breitung

Eric Breitung

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eric Breitung, Research Scientist, specializes in modern preservation materials and museum environment issues in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Scientific Research. His work includes the development of advanced analytical test methods for assessing commercial materials... Read More →
avatar for John Dunphy

John Dunphy

Vice President & General Manager, University Products
avatar for Andrew Robb

Andrew Robb

Special Projects Officer, Library of Congress
avatar for Michael Skalka

Michael Skalka

Conservation Administrator, National Gallery of Art
B.A., Art History, Rutgers University M.F.A. in Museum Studies, Syracuse University Conservation Administrator at the National Gallery of Art. 1984 to present. Responsible for overseeing daily financial administrative operations of the conservation division. Serves as the coordinator... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Architecture) Life after Lead Paint for Historic Houses
For centuries, lead based paints have been the primary paints used on external woodwork on historic houses. However, recent changes in legislation related to VOCs (volatile organic components) and the restriction of the use of lead paint due to toxicity has meant that paint formulations have changed to meet the changing legislation requirements. In addition, there has been a growing interest in the use of "environmentally friendly" paints. For historic houses, the cyclical maintenance requirements of repainting external woodwork is a major financial consideration and as result, the need to assess the performance of the wide variety of paints available encouraged the National Trust to undertake a series of paint trials to assess sustainability as well as consideration of the visual appearance of the paint (a factor which is important in maintaining the historic appearance of our properties). In 2006, the National Trust began a series of external paint trials on 13 garage doors on one of our properties to assess the performance of the selected paints. The trials provided information about the sustainability of the paints based on visual evidence of cracking, flaking, color change and moisture penetration. Whilst informative, it was realized that the results could not provide a recognized methodology for comparing the paints' performance. As a result, a group of heritage organizations led by the National Trust decided in 2011 to conduct a series of trials at the Paint Research Association in order to provide an industry recognized standard testing procedure to assess 34 paints which were selected on the basis of those used by the members of the group as well those which were commercially available to ensure that they would still be available after the conclusion of the trials. In addition, a number of "environmentally friendly" paints were included to assess their performance. The trials began in 2012 and after four years of testing, the results enabled the group to evaluate the performance of the paints and select 10 paints which performed above average as well as a linseed based paint, a lead based paint and a ICP (internal comparison product used as a standard) to be used to coat a number of the original panels to assess their performance. It was felt that this test would reflect more accurately the method of repainting used on historic properties where the underlying paint layer is simply sanded to remove defects and then coated with a new paint layer. It would also provide information about the sustainability of applying a different paint system over an existing paint layer. This paper explains the procedures involved and the results to date which should provide guidance for historic properties to ensure that the most sustainable paint systems are applied to external wood work.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Leback Sitwell

Christine Leback Sitwell

Paintings Conservation Adviser, National Trust
Christine Sitwell received a Master of Science in Art Conservation from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum in the United States. Subsequently she was awarded a Smithsonian fellowship for an internship in the conservation department at the Tate Gallery, London. In 1990 she... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Book and Paper) Branded by Fire: Treatment of los Primeros Libros
The Texas A&M University Libraries collections contains twenty examples of volumes designated as "primeros libros" and form the basis of international collaboration of nearly thirty institutions to build a digital humanities collections of these volumes available for research (http://www.primeroslibros.org). These Texas A&M University volumes are previously untreated at the libraries and several are in need of intense conservation treatment to bring them back as functional research tools. This presentation will review the unique characteristics of volumes of primeros libros selected for conservation, such as the marcas de fuegos (burned in brand) that is on several foredges of the books, and how those characteristics informed the treatment decisions while preserving the significance as unique artifacts.

Item Background: “Primeros libros” are books first printed in the Americas from approximately 1539 to 1605 in colonial Mexico and Peru. They are part of the Colonial Mexican Collection, which contains thousands of works either produced in Mexico or European imprints concerning Mexico during the Age of Exploration, Colonial, and early National periods and is a significant collecting area for the library as well as resource for the scholarly community in this area. The collection offers a significant number of examples of Mexican colonial bindings, woodcuts, illustrations, illuminated and decorated manuscripts, types, publishers, marginalia, and other information.

Speakers
avatar for Jeanne Goodman

Jeanne Goodman

Conservator, Texas A&M University Libraries
Jeanne Goodman is conservator for the University Libraries at Texas A&M University. She received her MLIS from Simmons College with a concentration in Preservation and her undergraduate work with University of Delaware in Collections Care. She completed the full-time Bookbinding program... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Electronic Media) Collaboration in the Aesthetic Zone: Trisha Brown and Robert Rauschenberg
Set and Reset is a masterpiece of American postmodern dance, establishing Trisha Brown's role as a seminal choreographer working within abstraction. The performance, a collaborative project between Trisha Brown (choreography), Laurie Anderson (music), and Robert Rauschenberg (set and costumes), made its U.S. debut in 1983 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York. To assure the longevity of Set and Reset, preserving the set’s film elements has become a collaborative effort between two of the artists’ estates, demonstrating a new preservation strategy for the exchange of information, histories, funding, storage, and clarification of rights. Since it's inception, the Trisha Brown Dance Company has frequently toured Set and Reset domestically and internationally, including a major performance this past spring 2017 as part of the Rauschenberg’s exhibition at Tate Modern, London. Prior to London, the performance continually used Rauschenberg’s original set, which Rauschenberg entitled Elastic Carrier (Shiner) despite the entire performance being named Set and Reset. The set consisted of a freestanding multi-pyramid structure on which montaged archival footage from 6 reels of films is projected, and the film elements were deteriorating from years of continued use. Recognizing this, TBDC applied without success for several grants to preserve the films. The project was "set and reset" a few times until fall 2016 when TBDC joined with the Rauschenberg Foundation and work proceeded with BB Optics and independent media conservator, Shu-Wen Lin. The result of this project debuted at the performance in London. Throughout the preservation project, we endeavored to track and document the reasoning behind the unavoidable changes between the 1983 and 2017 presentations. Given the collaborative nature, we carefully address the following issues - who is responsible to preserve a moving image work that is part of a performance? Is Elastic Carrier (Shiner) an independent work, or may it only exist as an element of the dance? What is the implications of migrating a moving image work in performance from film to digital projection? This panel aims to share the continuing conversation among estates and foundations, and to shed light on issues and principles surrounding the preservation of moving images in performative artworks.

Co-Authors
avatar for Shu-Wen Lin

Shu-Wen Lin

Research Fellow for Digital Preservation, National Library of Medicine
Shu-Wen Lin serves as Associate Conservator, Time-Based Media at M+ Museum for Visual Culture, and as Research Fellow for Digital Preservation at National Library of Medicine in 2017. She received her MA from the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program at New York University... Read More →
avatar for Cori Olinghouse

Cori Olinghouse

Archive Director, Trisha Brown Dance Company
Cori Olinghouse is an interdisciplinary artist, archivist, and curator. Since 2009, she has served as Archive Director for the Trisha Brown Dance Company, a company she danced for from 2002-2006. Olinghouse is currently developing a series of artist archivist projects that explore... Read More →
avatar for Francine Snyder

Francine Snyder

Director of Archives and Scholarship, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation
Francine Snyder is the Director of Archives and Scholarship at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. Prior to the Rauschenberg Foundation, Ms. Snyder spent nearly a decade as Director of the Library and Archives at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and, before that, she was a Project... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) Gold Working at Ur: A Collaborative Project to Better Understand Ancient Gold Smithing
This paper presents recent research on gold artifacts from the Royal Cemetery of Ur, ca. 2450-2100 BCE and proposes some possible methods for their manufacture. Sir Leonard Woolley excavated these artifacts at the site of Tell al-Muqayyar (ancient Ur) in southern Iraq in the 1920s-1930’s as part of a project sponsored by the Penn Museum and the British Museum. Iraq’s 1924 Antiquities Law provided for a division of finds, and half the material went to the Iraq Museum, with a quarter going to the Penn Museum and a quarter going to the British Museum. The initial data were collected as part of the Ur Digitization Project, a joint initiative between the Penn Museum and the British Museum to digitize objects and records at both institutions. The collaborative nature of the Ur digitization project fostered interdisciplinary research at the Penn Museum. These relationships have continued beyond the Ur Digitization Project and so too has the examination of the gold from Ur. Initial analysis of the gold from Ur focused on objects from Private Grave (PG) 1422. It has since expanded to include a diverse selection of gold items from the Royal Cemeteries as new research has been conducted in preparation for the re-installation of the Middle East galleries at the Museum. This paper will focus on three distinct object types, gold vessels, gold jewelry, and gold fillets. All the data presented here were captured non-invasively using digital X-radiography and digital photomicrographs. While X-radiography and microscopy are not new techniques for the examination of archaeological objects, new developments in digital processing allows for better data collection that can highlight features previously difficult to capture. The present study combines the knowledge of conservators, archaeometallurgists, and archaeologists to better understand how the gold vessels and adornments from the royal cemeteries may have been manufactured. This interdisciplinary study places the objects within their archaeological context as well as highlights which aspects of their manufacture are significant.

Speakers
avatar for Tessa de Alarcon-[PA]

Tessa de Alarcon-[PA]

Project Conservator, Penn Museum
Tessa de Alarcon has been employed as a Project Conservator at the Penn Museum since 2012. She has worked on two condition assessment projects, the Ur Digitization Project and the Digital Kourion project and she is currently working on preparing objects for the re-installation of... Read More →

Co-Authors
MJ

Moritz Jansen

Teaching Specialist for Archaeometallurgy for the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials, Penn Museum
Moritz Jansen has been the Teaching Specialist for Archaeometallurgy at the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials at the Penn Museum since October 2015. Before he came to the Penn Museum he was employed as a Research Fellow in the Department for Archaeometallurgy... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Richard Zettler

Dr. Richard Zettler

Associate Curator-in-Charge of Penn Museum’s Near East Section, Penn Museum
Richard L. Zettler is an archaeologist specializing in Mesopotamia, the region occupied by modern Iraq and Syria. He received his MA and PhD (1984) in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago. He worked at Nippur, early Mesopotamia’s religious center... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Paintings) Gabriel Revel’s "Portrait of a Sculptor": a painting and treatment in transition.
The examination and treatment of Old Master works inevitably involves the interpretation and conceptual deconstruction of a complex overlay of visual evidence of the artist’s studio practice, natural aging of materials, past structural treatments, cleanings, restorations, and even associated damage. In the case of a portrait by the French baroque academic painter Gabriel Revel, these tasks were complicated by the dramatic revelation of compositional features in part obscured by the painter himself in pentimento. In particular, the rendering of a small statuette that had been covered by past restoration raised questions about the correct reading of the piece. As part of the creative evolution of the portrait, Revel modified the left forearm and hand position to make room for the inclusion of a classical statuary fragment of a head. Yet the positioning of the fingers is ambiguous and the painter’s intentions are unclear as to whether the portrait was meant to contain both of the sculptural fragments or just one. Digital X-radiography imaging of the substrate paint layers conducted at Oregon Health and Sciences University was hampered by an aluminum sheet concealed within the wax resin lining dating to the 1960s. Mammography, with a higher resolution for assessing subtle differences between densities in materials, also provided limited results regarding the original composition. Imaging was helpful, but failed to present a clear answer to questions that remained regarding the reconciliation of the various compositional features of the subject’s left hand and his possessions. Reversal of the lining and removal of the aluminum sheet were considered to improve imaging clarity, but eliminated as options due to the sustained structural stability of the lining materials. Ultimately, a bold curatorial decision was made to temporarily reveal all compositional elements of the painting. Although the composition has greater clarity and visual strength without the statuette, suggesting a reason why it was previously masked, the restoration choice was acknowledged as potentially a transitional state. It is hoped that bringing attention to the work will inspire research of Gabriel Revel, an artist with scarce dedicated scholarship, and therefore provide greater clarity regarding the artist’s intentions. The paper will discuss conservation of the portrait as a sum of multiple historic identities, and the decision making process that guided the treatment choices in the formal interpretation, perhaps ephemeral, of "Portrait of a Sculptor".

Speakers
avatar for Nina Olsson

Nina Olsson

Principal and owner, Nina Olsson Art Conservation, LLC
Nina Olsson is a researcher and conservator of paintings in private practice established in Portland, Oregon in 2001. Since 2015, Nina is also president and co-founder of Heritage Conservation Group, LLC, a consortium of Portland-based conservators of diverse specialties. Nina has... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Springer-[PA]

Samantha Springer-[PA]

Conservator, Portland Art Museum
Samantha Springer relocated to Portland, Oregon in 2015 to take the position of Conservator at the Portland Art Museum. While Samantha remains a generalist due to her responsibility for care of a broad collection, she has particular interest in preventive conservation, sustainability... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Photographic Materials) Revealing History with Moisture and Megabytes: Curled Panorama Prints from WWI and WWII
This case study presents an ongoing project in collaboration with a military history museum and their archives for the conservation and digital preservation of 150 - 200 silver gelatin panorama prints from World War I (1917 -1918) and World War II (1940 - 1944). This project began in 2011 and work continues as funds are available. Along the way, other work has been requested and some replica digital prints have been made for the Adjutant General's office, the HQ offices, and VIP Officers' temporary housing.

Using example prints of the project, I will explain and illustrate the steps taken from the receipt and documentation of the original photographs, through the humidifying and flattening of the prints, to the repair and/or lining for stabilization. The next steps for the digital reformatting and any digital repair to the photographs will explain the level of capture and files that were requested by the museum's archivist. Finally, the reprinting of the photographs as digital prints in oversized formats will be adiscussed. To date, approximately 30 individual images that were in the original collection have been conserved.

Over the past six years, there have been new donations to the museum and donors have requested copies of the donated prints.  The museum has agreed, using some of their funds for this purpose. There have been approximately 7-9 unaccessioned prints that were requested to be reformatted instead of the original group.  One of the most interesting of the new prints is believed to be a photograph of the first Airborne Company formed in the U.S. Army.  

Sizes of prints ranged from 3"x 12", to 10"x 38", to 8"x 48", and the reformatted digital image files run into the gigabyte sizes. The prints are on neutral tone B&W papers, warm tone B&W papers, sepia and brown toned B&W papers. Some are semi-matte, though most are matte finished papers and all have a baryta coating. A few have the soldier's handwriting on them, showing where the "saloon", mess hall, "my tent", and various companies of a brigade. This presentation will show not only the details of the original materials used in these prints and steps used to conserve them, but will also allow us to put into perspective of the human element that was, and is, a part of war and the preparations. It reveals some of the naïveté that men and societies had when soldiers reported to training for combat during those eras.

Speakers
avatar for Kim R. Du Boise-[PA]

Kim R. Du Boise-[PA]

President; Senior Photograph Conservator, PhotoArts Imaging Professionals, LLC
Kim R. Du Boise has over 40 years’ experience with art, photography, and photographic materials as a photographer, university/college instructor, printmaker & conservator. Kim developed the art department at Pearl River Community College in 1987-1994 and a BFA curriculum in Photography... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) A contribution toward the identification of wood by heart-cut pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry.
This paper presents a novel method for conducting wood identification based on chemical analysis using heart-cut pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HC-Py-GC/MS) to analyze volatile fractions and thermal decomposition products from finely divided wood samples. This method has several advantages over traditional anatomical identification including a significantly reduced sample size (0.3 mg of powder vs. more than 40 mg for traditional thin anatomical sections), and increased ease of sampling. The method also shows promise for successfully discriminating between species that are not separable by anatomical methods. The use of an established analytical technique that is widely found in conservation science laboratories should make this method readily accessible to many researchers in the cultural heritage sector. The use of user-friendly and commercially available software for the evaluation of the GC/MS data also makes it possible to develop a reference database that can be easily shared and referenced by collaborating researchers. Evolved gas analysis (EGA) was used to establish an optimized furnace temperature that minimizes the production of compounds from the pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose while maximizing the contribution of non-cellulosic components such as lignin and extractives, which are more likely to be characteristic of specific species. The use of a selective sampler system further reduces cellulosic contributions to the chromatograms by diverting evolved gases away from the GC column after 30 seconds of sample residence in the pyrolyzer. Results were interpreted through comparison with reference standards utilizing F-Search from Frontier Laboratories, which is software commonly used for the identification of polymeric materials and additives in plastics. The software produces a weighted average of the mass spectra of all integrated components in a chromatogram (an INT-SUM spectrum), which can be matched against an established library of standards. Comparison of the chromatograms and statistical evaluation of the INT-SUM spectra by F-Search provided accurate results and eliminated the need for specific compound identification, thus rapidly increasing the speed of data interpretation. F-Search also allows for the exclusion of peaks, which is a feature used to eliminate problematic peaks produced by contaminants such as glues, varnishes or waxes. For this preliminary study, reference samples of 62 wood species commonly found in decorative arts collections were analyzed with the optimized HC-Py-GC/MS method. The resulting chromatograms and INT-SUM spectra were compiled in a reference library. The method was validated by analyzing samples taken from 17th – 19th century objects within the J. Paul Getty Museum collection and comparing the results to identifications made through traditional anatomical study. All of the samples were correctly identified through the combined use of the F-search ranking system and visual comparison of the chromatograms.

Speakers
avatar for Arlen Heginbotham

Arlen Heginbotham

Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture, J. Paul Getty Museum
Arlen Heginbotham received his A.B. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and his M.A. in Art Conservation from Buffalo State College. He is currently Conservator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Arlen’s research interests include the history... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Jessica Chasen

Jessica Chasen

Assistant Conservator, J. Paul Getty Museum
Jessica Chasen is an assistant conservator in Decorative Arts and Sculpture Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Jessica earned an M.S. in Art Conservation from Winterthur / University of Delaware with a specialization in objects conservation and a minor in painted surfaces... Read More →
avatar for Michael R. Schilling

Michael R. Schilling

Senior Scientist, Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Michael Schilling is head of Materials Characterization research at the Getty Conservation Institute, which focuses on development of analytical methods for studying classes of materials used by artists and conservators. He specializes in gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:00am

(Textiles) The Mortlake Horses: A Collaborative Approach to the Conservation of Seventeenth-Century British Tapestries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
In preparation for the fall 2019 re-opening of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s renovated British Galleries, Associate Conservator Olha Yarema-Wynar and Assistant Conservator Alexandra Barlow completed the long-term conservation treatment of the seventeenth-century tapestry The Destruction of the Children of Niobe (#36.149.1) from the English Mortlake workshop. This tapestry is one of two within The Met’s collection from The Horses, a set which depicts riding horses found in Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
The Destruction of the Children of Niobe, measuring approximately twelve feet by twenty feet, is impressive in size and image. Past restoration efforts of this large artwork are visible throughout the piece, and within this one tapestry exists numerous examples of the techniques used in the history of tapestry preservation. The most recent treatment was informed by an understanding of these historic techniques and the skill and experience of the conservators.  Stimulating conversations with curators at The Metropolitan Museum of Art also influenced the treatment by helping to determine the aesthetic vision for the tapestry. These discussions presented a challenge on how to accommodate the vision of the curators with the conservators’ decisions about stabilization needs and the tenets of current conservation philosophy.
For both conservators and curators, historic repairs are a valuable document of prior methods. They provide an understanding of changes in technical skill, the effects of restorations, and the shifting viewpoints on the value of tapestries. The conservators working on this project were able to survey in detail these previous techniques. This presentation discusses both the methods that have proved stable, as well as those that have caused additional conservation issues over time. While many of the historic insertions are strong and discrete, earlier use of darning and mending stitches have caused distortions to the surrounding areas. It was only after careful dialogue and discussion on the stability of the textile that these previous repairs were documented, removed, and updated. Time was also a consideration throughout the entire treatment.
The 2016-2017 treatment involved both conservation and restoration stitching, as well as a combination of both handwoven fabric used for reproduction gallon borders and commercially available fabric for stabilization and the lining.
As a case study, this presents the examination of one object and how its materials and techniques provide critical annotation to the history of the preservation of tapestries.  

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Barlow

Alexandra Barlow

Assistant Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Alexandra Barlow, Assistant Conservator, is currently working with Olha Yarema-Wynar on the treatment of three large tapestries in preparation for the renovation of the British Galleries. She received her MA in Fashion and Textile Studies with a focus on Conservation from the Fashion... Read More →
avatar for Olha Yarema Wynar

Olha Yarema Wynar

Associate Conservator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Olha Yarema-Wynar, Associate Conservator, is responsible for the conservation of textiles from the Department of Arms and Armor and the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Art's tapestries collection. She holds an MFA in decorative and applied arts from the Lviv National... Read More →



Friday June 1, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Electronic Media) Lighting Round - Emulating Horizons (2008) by Geert Mul: the challenges of intensive graphics rendering
Similar to a conservator going into the details of a certain paint or plastic used in an artwork, I will concentrate on the graphics pipeline of Horizons (2008), a software-based artwork by Dutch media artist Geert Mul. The graphics pipeline is a chain of software and hardware tools a computer needs to render graphics. It can be very specific for video games or software-based artworks that make use of intensive, real-time graphics rendering and it has an impact on the preservation strategy. This research is based on the publications (Falcao et al. 2014)1 and (Rechert et al. 2016)2. Computer rendered graphics are quite common in software-based art. Artists may use video game software to produce video games for their simulations or interactive animations as for instance for Sow Farm (2009) by John Gerrard or Olympia (2016) by David Claerbout. Other artists and their collaborators produce the software themselves as for instance Geert Mul and his programmer Carlo Prelz did for Horizons (2008). Horizons (2008) has a classical setup for a computer-based artwork: it receives user input from a sensor, the computer generates a video by combining image sources and the sensor input and outputs the video on video projectors. Thus, it should be possible to generalize the findings of this research for artworks with a corresponding setup. While preparing for his retrospective, Geert Mul realised, that many of his artworks did not function anymore and needed updating or transfer to newer hardware. Consequently, he initiated a project with LIMA, a platform for research and archiving of media artworks in Amsterdam, in order to make his artworks “future proof” 3. Horizons (2008) did not have an immediate problem. However, when evaluating its long-term preservation options, it turned out that its graphics rendering was video card dependent. The model of the video card was hard-coded into the software, which means that changing the video card makes the work dysfunctional. As emulators of personal computers usually do not emulate specific video cards, I also feared, that Horizons could not be emulated. The hard-coding of the video card could be remedied by adapting the reference from the old to the new video card. However, it would still not make the work suitable for emulation. Furthermore, it appeared that certain intermediary software libraries are necessary in order to make the work independent from the hardware and therefore enable software rendering or virtualization. By analysing the graphics pipeline, it is thus possible to assess with a high probability whether the work can be emulated or virtualized. Other factors that might impede an emulation such as peripheral equipment are not discussed here. Yet, I will show, what has to be considered when “building” such an emulation or virtualization for graphics intensive artworks. 1 Falcao, Patricia; Ashe, Alistair; Jones, Brian (2014): Virtualisation as a Tool for the Conservation of Software-Based Artworks. Tate. London. 2 Rechert, Klaus; Ensom, Tom; Falcao, Patricia (2016): Introduction to an emulation-based preservation strategy for software-based artworks. Pericles / Tate. 3 http://www.li-ma.nl/site/news/future-proof-transformation-digital-art-2017

Speakers
avatar for Claudia Roeck

Claudia Roeck

PhD candidate, University of Amsterdam
My interest lies in the preservation of time-based media art. The ongoing and fast technological change and the processual character of many contemporary artworks open a fascinating field of work. I started my professional career as an environmental engineer with focus on waste management... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 9:45am
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Architecture) Can’t Touch This! The Treatment of Original Distemper Painted Plaster Walls
In May of 2016, members of the Department of Conservation and Technical Research at the Walters Art Museum began to investigate the original plaster walls in the library of 1 West Mount Vernon Place, which is now a part of the museum complex. This impressive family home was designed by architects Niernsee and Neilson and was completed by1851. After a series of other owners and uses, the building was given to the museum by the City of Baltimore in 1984. It subsequently underwent significant renovations and opened to the public in 1991 as a gallery of Asian Art. In 2016, after 25 years of use, upgrades to the HVAC system and the installation of a fire suppression system led to the temporary closure of the building and allowed for gallery refurbishments. When the conservation department was asked to remove fabric paneling from the library so that it could be replaced, they were surprised to find that the original painted ornamental plaster that had not been viewed since 1991 was largely intact. This raised and decoratively painted ornamental plaster was first covered with fabric in the 1890s when the house underwent significant alterations. At that time, many of the high points of the plaster had been chiseled off to allow the fabric panels to span the walls without distortion. In addition, later upgrades, including the installation of gas and electric lines for wall sconces and an air duct were made without regard to the plaster walls. Despite these interventions, the original color scheme and decorative painting were intact, especially in the protected upper areas of the walls. One interesting feature of the design was the use of faux wood graining on the raised plaster elements. The faux wood graining integrated the painted plaster with the surrounding woodwork. Early hand-colored photographs of the room also show that there was an elaborate ornamental plaster ceiling that was later covered with a wooden beam ceiling. Despite numerous alterations to the room, the conservation staff advocated for the preservation and display of this rare survival of an original architectural painted finish. Given the size of the project, the conservation department contracted additional help to complete the conservation and restoration of the library walls. Once the project started, the extreme sensitivity of the distemper painted finish to water and polar solvents posed significant challenges in the selection of treatment materials and methods. The application of any sort of mold making material to the friable and readily stained painted surface was impossible, meaning that a “touch-less” method was needed to re-create large missing raised plaster elements. A partnership with the 3-D scanning and printing program at Harford Community College provided some creative solutions for this project. Silicone solvents aided in removing some large spackle repairs from the walls by providing a safe way to remove a water-soluble material from a water-soluble surface. The material challenges of this project led to creative solutions that can hopefully be adapted for future use in architecture and other specialties.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Marie Hulman-[PA]

Stephanie Marie Hulman-[PA]

Conservator, Decorative Arts Conservation LLC
Stephanie Hulman is a professional conservator of decorative and historic finishes, and she has been working in the field of heritage preservation since 2005. She earned her Master of Science in Art Conservation degree from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation... Read More →
TP

Tia Polidori

Conservation Technician, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library
Tia is a conservation technician working on a two-year IMLS grant at Winterthur recoating silver objects in the Winterthur collection.


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Book and Paper) The unintended effects of some book treatments on original or early binding structures and materials
The treatment of bound materials in special collections has become more conservative over the past half century. Today, book conservators choose treatments that safeguard physical information intrinsic to early bindings. The treatments focus on mending and stabilizing book structures, which lessen the need for invasive treatments such as rebinding or rebacking covers. However, in repairing rather than replacing older structures and materials, the book conservator is often challenged by the binding's deteriorated condition, which can range from slight to considerable. At the Ransom Center, we have found that the repair of one binding structure can stress and, in some cases, break adjacent deteriorated binding components. This presentation will discuss problems that typical repairs can cause such as a new break in the sewing structure or stiffness in the spine, which changes how a book opens and how the pages turn. Techniques used by Ransom Center conservators to minimize stress to older components in order to preserve early structures and materials will be described using case studies.

Speakers
avatar for Olivia Primanis

Olivia Primanis

Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center
Olivia Primanis is the Senior Book Conservator at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, where she performs conservation treatments and manages the book lab and special projects. She is interested in general conservation and preservation subjects relating to library and museum... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) The Tell-Tale Conservation of Two 2,000 Year Old Leather Water-Skins
In the early sixties, archaeologist Yigael Yadin excavated the "Cave of Letters" located near the Dead Sea in the Judean Desert, Israel. The cave probably served as a hideout during the second Jewish revolt against the Romans in 132 CE. Among many rare finds were several vegetable tanned leather water-skins, two of them in nearly complete form. While water-skins were originally created to contain liquids, the content of one of these excavated water-skins was different. It included: unspun wool skeins, jewelry, clothing, small glass vessels, wooden cosmetics utensils, and spindle whorls, indicating a secondary use of the water-skin as a satchel. The most historically significant items in the water-skin were a packet of letters written by Shimon Bar Kokhba himself, the leader of the rebellion, to his subordinates in hiding - hence the name “Cave of Letters”. The dry, stable conditions in the cave resulted in the leather’s fine state of preservation. Details such as historical repairs, in the form of sewn patches, could clearly be recognized in several places on the water-skin, and its opening end was still tied with an original rope. The water-skins, which are under the jurisdiction of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), are part of the archaeological collection of the Israel Museum (IMJ) in Jerusalem and are on display. Prior to their arrival at the IMJ, the water-skins were treated, probably in the mid 1960’s. Although no treatment records exist, black and white photographs from the excavation revealed that this initial treatment included cleaning, reshaping and inserting an inner support of a thick, cream colored fabric stuffed with hay. Nylon filament was used to hold down leather pieces which were folded over. In 1998, the IMJ’s Metal and Organic Materials Conservation Department was asked to assess the condition of the two treated water-skins. The evaluation concluded that while the leather was in exceptional state for its age, the 1960’s materials used in the treatment were not of conservation grade, and the aesthetics of the objects were not pleasing. It was therefore decided that one of the water-skins would be retreated. In 2017, fifty years after its initial treatment, and twenty years after the retreatment of its “twin”, the second water-skin was retreated. Over the span of 55 years, three different teams of well-meaning professionals tended to these invaluable treasures. Each team, with their knowledge and available materials, used these to their best abilities. This presentation aims to reveal, compare, and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment within the perspective of time.

Speakers
avatar for Irit Lev Beyth-[PA]

Irit Lev Beyth-[PA]

Head of Metals and Organic Objects Conservation, The Israel Museum
Irit Lev Beyth graduated in 1994 from Queen's University with a Master's of Art in Conservation. She interned at The Brooklyn Museum of Art and has been an objects conservator at The Israel Museum since 1998. In 2015 she was appointed Head of Metals and Organic Materials Conservation... Read More →
avatar for Hadas Seri

Hadas Seri

Object Conservator, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
Hadas Seri is an object conservator at the Metals and Organic Materials Conservation, the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. She graduated in 2010 from the Master of Art Conservation program at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada. Ms. Seri holds a second MA in Art History and a B.Sc... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Liatte Dotan

Liatte Dotan

Pre-Program Intern, The Israel Museum
Liatte is a pre-program intern in object conservation at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. In 2016 she obtained her B.A from the Honors Art History Program at Tel Aviv University. Liatte intends to continue her studies with a degree in art conservation in the coming years.
avatar for Jessica Lewinsky

Jessica Lewinsky

Object Conservator, Israel Museum
Jessica Lewinsky is an objects conservator at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. She specializes in collections care and preventive conservation. In 2014 she obtained her B.A.Sc. in Art and Heritage Conservation from ECRO, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; and in 2017 her M.A. in Theory and... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Paintings) Old World, New World: Painting Practices in the Reformed 1686 Painter’s Guild of Mexico City
In 1911, Emily Johnston de Forest, daughter of the founding president of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, John Taylor Johnston, donated her vast collection of tin-glazed earthenware to encourage the creation of a permanent display showcasing the artistic grandeur of colonial Mexican art. Despite her efforts, de Forest’s vision was not realized until 2013, when the Museum appointed a curator of Colonial Latin American Art. Since then, the Museum has organized exhibitions and acquired artworks from New Spain. For more than three hundred years this Spanish kingdom encompassed modern-day Central America up to the western half of the United States, as well as the Philippines. The Museum’s newly focused interest in the artistic output of this territory prompted the technical examination of two paintings, one by Cristóbal de Villalpando (ca. 1649-1714) and the other by José Sánchez (active 1686-95). From 1686 to 1688, these artists worked closely in the Painter’s Guild of Mexico City, scrutinizing the works of many young aspiring artists. In this capacity, they were responsible for shaping Mexican artistic practices well into the 18th century.

Cristóbal de Villalpando, the most productive painter of the New Spanish Baroque, developed an individual aesthetic that distinguished him from his contemporaries. The technical study of his Adoration of the Magi (1683) was carried out for a monographic exhibition on the artist that took place at the Metropolitan from July 25 to October 15, 2017. Unpublished and unknown to scholars, The Adoration has been in the collection of Fordham University since the mid-19th century, and has only recently been included into the artist’s oeuvre. The Marriage of the Virgin (ca. 1690) by José Sánchez was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum in 2016. It is one scene from a series depicting the life of the Virgin Mary, a subject frequently explored by painters in Spanish America. The paintings were created within a span of ten years, during which these artists served two years together as Guild examiners.

The results of our findings will be discussed in both regional and international contexts and will reveal the close connections and differences between preparation practices in Spain and its transatlantic territories. Of particular interest is the identification of ash in the ground layers of both paintings. This type of preparation is described by Francisco Pacheco in his 1649 treatise and has been identified in paintings of artists practicing in Madrid. This study presents material evidence that Mexican artists were following Madrilenian traditions, which had most likely been passed down through the Spanish painters that arrived in New Spain from the motherland.

This study comes at a propitious time. Art historical attention to New Spain has increased in the last decades but technical studies that contextualize the unique qualities of these important paintings are limited. Focusing attention on the individual contributions of New Spanish artists is essential to increase awareness of their artistic production, and create a body of knowledge about their material practices. 

Authors in Publication Order: José Luis Lazarte Luna, Dorothy Mahon, Silvia Centeno, Federico Caró, Louisa Smieska

Speakers
avatar for José Luis Lazarte Luna

José Luis Lazarte Luna

Andrew W. Mellon Fellow, Department of Paintings Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Department of Paintings Conservation
José Luis Lazarte Luna obtained a Master of Science degree from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation with a specialization in paintings. He is completing his second year as a fellow in the Department of Paintings Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Federico Carò

Federico Carò

Associate Research Scientist, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Scientific Research
Federico Carò received his PhD in Earth Science from the University of Pavia, Italy, where he worked on the characterization of natural and artificial building materials for conservation purposes. Since joining the staff of The Metropolitan Museum of Art he has investigated inorganic... Read More →
avatar for Silvia Centeno

Silvia Centeno

Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research, The Metropolitan Museum of Art/ Department of Scientific Research
Silvia A. Centeno is a Research Scientist in the Department of Scientific Research at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she collaborates with scientists, conservators, and curators in studying and preserving works of art, and also pursues research in treatment methodologies and... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Mahon-[PA]

Dorothy Mahon-[PA]

Conservator, Department of Paintings Conservation, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Dorothy Mahon received her MA in the history of art and a certificate of advanced study in conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. She was appointed to the staff in 1981 and has conserved paintings spanning the collection, with emphasis on the technical... Read More →
avatar for Louisa Smieska

Louisa Smieska

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Fellow, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Scientific Research
Louisa Smieska received her PhD in Materials Chemistry from Cornell University in 2015 and then pursued postdoctoral research at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), where she developed expertise in scanning X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the corresponding data analysis. Her... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Photographic Materials) From Here On and Beyond: Researching Objects, History and Collection at The Museum of Modern Art
The Museum of Modern Art's 4-year Thomas Walther Collection project culminated in December 2014 with a symposium, Object: Photo print publication, website and exhibition.  This material-based study of the Walter Collection is symptomatic of a larger institutional interest in materials characterization that is not confined to a single collection, medium or even institution, but part of an ongoing effort to promote materials-based scholarship at large. Three years hence, assimilation of conservation material content continues at MoMA as well as in related arts fields, as can be seen in curatorial, technical art history and academic initiatives focused on material culture.
In 2005 with the Plane Image: A Brice Marden Retrospective, 2006 with Dada in the Collection, and on a yearly basis since, the department of conservation at MoMA has published formative work on individual artists, or artistic movements, in conjunction with curatorial initiatives.  Subjects include work of Pablo Picasso, Bill Brandt, Henri Matisse, Bruce Conner, Francis Picabia and Frank Lloyd Wright, among many others. In 2012, there was a considerable uptick in these studies which now include online publications.  Raisonné-style format to artistic studies is increasingly seen as a model. 
This presentation will outline the development of MoMA’s conservation scholarship, consider how this trend is reflected in and parallel to, sister institution's programming, posit views on the causes of this trend and review resources for these critical investigations.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Ann Daffner-[PA]

Lee Ann Daffner-[PA]

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Conservator of Photographs, The Museum of Modern Art
Lee Ann Daffner is the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Conservator of Photographs at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City since 1998 and is responsible for all aspects of the preservation, conservation and materials research for photographs in all the Museum’s collections... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) Interdisciplinary and Multi-Technique Study of Previous Conservation, Bending Media, and Pigments of a Painted Polychrome Coffin from the Late Period
This paper describes the scientific investigations of an Ancient Egyptian painted wooden coffin, dating back to late period (664-332 BC). The polychrome coffin was previously restored, and previous plaster fills obscured original surface. The focus of this study is to use a multi-analytical approach to map and identify the pigments used on a polychrome wooden coffin , as well as to provide a deeper understanding of the painting techniques, the condition of the object, identification of wood species, identification of insects founded inside coffin, previous conservation materials, ground layer and painted layer included in this study. Several analytical and observation methods were employed in the identification processes such as the Light optical microscopy (OM), X-ray fluorescence portable (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Moreover, the application of technical photography provided useful information about the spatial distribution of the surviving original pigments, in particular visible-induced luminescence, which played an important role to recognize spatial distribution of areas containing Egyptian blue, even if it is in traces or mixed with other pigments, the authors were significantly interested in mapping technical photography (TP) including IR false color with XRF results as a non destructive methods to identify coffin pigments. Red pigment identified as Cinnabar, and recorded as a rare pigment found in late period collections. Key words: painted wooden coffin; Multispectral imaging; XRF; wood identification; Cinnabar

Speakers
avatar for Mohamed Moustafa

Mohamed Moustafa

Scientific conservator, Grand Egyptian Museum
Licence in Archaeology from Cairo University, Faculty of Archeology, Conservation Departement , 2010 ,now he is master student specialized in conservation of wooden artifacts and working in his master about (Treatment and Conservation gilded and painted wooden artifacts with application... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Medhat Abdallah

Dr. Medhat Abdallah

Head, Wood Laboratory, Grand Egyptian Museum, Conservation Center, Ministry of Antiquities
Dr. Medhat abd allah abd elhamid, Director of Conservation for the Sqqara Collection, is a specialist in conservation of wooden artifacts. He has published many papers and posters in international periodicals and conferences and shared as an Egyptian expert in the joint conservation... Read More →
avatar for Ahmed Abdrabou

Ahmed Abdrabou

Conservator, Wood Laboratory, Grand Egyptian Museum, Conservation Center, Ministry of Antiquities
Ahmed Abdrabou is conservator at the Wood Laboratory, Grand Egyptian Museum, Conservation Centre (GEM.CC), Ministry of Antiquities, Egypt. Ahmed carried out several treatments on many museum objects, in particular the collection of King Tutankhamun. He is currently the head of documentation... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Hussein M. Kamal

Dr. Hussein M. Kamal

Technical Affairs, Grand Egyptian Museum, Conservation Center
Hussein M. Kamal, PhD in Conservation of Antiquities, is the General Director of Conservation Technical Affairs at the Grand Egyptian Museum, Egypt. He has published extensively in different conservation aspects and presented lots of issues in international conferences and congresses... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:30am

(Textiles) Confronting Challenges and Considering Consensus in the Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Fashion
This paper and presentation will focus on the conservation of an eighteenth-century French court dress and the research that this work inspired. Undertaken during a Fellowship at the Costume Institute, the treatment was an opportunity to consider broadly the conservation of garments from this time period. While there is no set of conservation methods or ethics unique to eighteenth-century costume, a collection survey of that century’s womenswear revealed certain patterns of degradation and common issues relating to both treatment and display. For example, how should conservators approach garments that have been altered, as so many eighteenth-century garments have been? Questions like this became the basis of a larger study of fashion conservation practice, drawing on both literature review and interviews with conservators in the United States, United Kingdom, and France. These not only provided an understanding of the range of possible solutions for the problems posed by eighteenth-century garments, but also shed light on a more abstract question: to what extent is there (or is there not) a consensus among conservators as to best practice for the conservation of fashion objects? Furthermore, do differences in approach lie along personal, institutional, or geographic lines?

Speakers
avatar for Marina Hays

Marina Hays

Polaire Weissman Conservation Fellow, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Costume Institute
Marina Hays is the Polaire Weissman Fund Fellow in Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute, where she is currently researching fashion conservation practice with a particular focus on eighteenth-century garments. She was previously an intern at The Met... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

9:45am

(Electronic Media) Lighting Round - Preserving Stephan von Huene’s electronic artworks by means of bit-stream documentation
The ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, Germany is well-known for its media art collection. Recently the ZKM inherited two artworks by German-Californian artist Stephan von Huene, which have been undergoing a comprehensive acquisition process by means of audio, video and bit-stream documentation during a one and a half year fellowship. Von Huene’s computer-based sound installation "What’s wrong with Art?" (1997) shall be core theme and case study of the given talk. Stephan von Huene is a particular case, when it comes to systematic documentation of his electronic artworks by the artist himself. The artists estate, a meticulous archive of photographic and technical documents, is demonstrating this systematic way of working, and thus is a outstanding source for researchers. "What’s wrong with Art?" (1997) consists of three computer controlled organ towers in the colors red, yellow and blue, a complex electronic circuit, custom-made computer hardware as well as executable and compiled files written by the artist. Assessing the risks, future access and preservation it became apparent that the computer, with its individual plug-in cards and compiled code once failing could not be reactivated, reproduced or emulated and would therefore be lost. To cope with this issue, the electronics technicians, information scientists and conservators of ZKM worked closely together to tackle the risk of loss by designing an individual “Logic Analyzer”, recording and documenting the output and bit-stream of the computer and conducting comprehensive documentation of the logic system.

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Bunz

Sophie Bunz

Assistant Conservator, University of the Arts Bern
Sophie Bunz completed a Masters program in Conservation-Restoration of Modern Materials and Media at Bern University of the Arts, Switzerland. After her studies she held a fellowship at the ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, Germany. Subsequently she works as an assistant for... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 9:45am - 10:00am
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

10:00am

Break in the Exhibit Hall
Friday June 1, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Texas Ballrooms E-H (Exhibit Hall) Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Architecture) Moving a Monument: The Relocation of Extending Arms of Christ at Houston Methodist Hospital
Extending Arms of Christ is a 96’ L by 16’ H site-specific mosaic mural created in 1963 by Bruce Hayes for the front façade of Houston Methodist Hospital. Originally consisting of 3 large scale panels of Italian glass tesserae on a concrete bedding, the mosaic was designed to be the most prominent decorative feature above the entry doors to a major teaching hospital associated with Houston’s Baylor University medical school. Distinctly modern in character, the mosaic features the Christ figure with extended arms at the center of a geometric abstract background that is punctuated with stylized imagery of modern medical equipment, doctors, and historical figures, like Florence Nightingale. In 2014, RLA was contacted by Hunt Construction Group, a firm overseeing expansion of the hospital, to determine if the mosaic could be relocated into a 50’ atrium within the lobby of a new tower addition. Over the years, the mosaic had become obscured from the street by trees lining the sidewalk. A porte cochere, added in 1987, had covered up the bottom 4’ of the mosaic. Relocating the mosaic would allow it to be showcased once again for hospital patrons, as well as preserved and protected in a controlled interior setting. Moving an artwork of this size is challenging under any condition. This one was further complicated by its location over the hospital’s main entrance and next to the emergency room driveway, which barred the use of a crane or blocking of the street. A test probe revealed that the mosaic was separate from the wall of the building and therefore theoretically detachable. However, preclusion of the crane meant that the original panels, which measured 38’ 6” wide by 16’ high and weighed approximately 10,850 pounds, would need to be cut to allow them to be lowered by a gantry that could accommodate a maximum of 400 - 500 pounds. Our first task was to figure out how to do this without impacting the design elements, and determining in advance that the mosaic could later be re-assembled seamlessly. Because design of the new addition was completed by the time the mosaic relocation was considered, our next challenge was how to reinstall the artwork onto a metal stud wall. The engineer’s design solution involved the use of plywood, which raised concern because of possible warpage in the event of a catastrophic weather event. Said event occurred on August 25, 2017, when Hurricane Harvey devastated the Houston Metropolitan area. Installation of the 93 cut mosaic panels was completed at that point. Only the repair of the join lines remained to be done. As of this writing, we have not been able to return to Houston after Harvey. However, Hunt construction informs us that the mosaic is intact. As part of this presentation we will reveal what, if any, impact the hurricane had on the mosaic. The goal is to complete the conservation by December 2017.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Ciociola-[PA]

Kelly Ciociola-[PA]

Senior Conservator, RLA Conservation
Kelly Ciociola holds a 2010 Masters in Historic Preservation with a concentration in materials conservation from the joint program of Clemson University and College of Charleston . A Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation, she presently serves as Senior... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Rosa Lowinger-[Fellow]

Rosa Lowinger-[Fellow]

Principal Conservator, RLA Conservation
Rosa Lowinger graduated from the NYU conservation program in 1982 and has been a Professional Associate of the AIC since 1984. In private practice since 1987, she presently has studios in Miami and Los Angeles where she specializes in problems specific to sculpture and contemporary... Read More →
avatar for Christina Varvi-[PA]

Christina Varvi-[PA]

Senior Conservator, RLA Conservation, Inc.
Christina Varvi, Senior Conservator and Professional Associate of the AIC, holds an M.S. in Historic Preservation with a concentration in Materials Conservation from Columbia University. A specialist in architectural and public art conservation, Christina is RLA’s lead professional... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Book and Paper) Transparent Liquid Colors: "Not Just For Ornament"
Today, transparent graphic effects can be made with the click of a mouse. However, in the 18th century, a specific type of colorant was commercially manufactured to render clear, brilliant, transparent effects. These colorants were called transparent liquid colors. They are little mentioned in the conservation literature and in the history of watercolor. These liquids are very different from water-based media used for other types of objects, such as miniatures and even other types of popular prints. The transparent liquids were commonly used for coloring maps, plans, prints, and even painting on velvet. This paper will examine the history and development of the transparent liquids and will include observations from recreations based on recipes found in historic manuals. The identification of transparent liquids, visually and analytically, may help to answer one of the vexing questions regarding hand coloring – that is “who put the color on the map or print?” The use of the transparent colors may suggest a professional or technical hand, versus amateur, particularly after the invention of watercolor in cake form.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Irving-[PA]

Joan Irving-[PA]

Paper Conservator, Winterthur Museum
Joan Irving is the paper conservator of Winterthur Museum and is an affiliated professor of art conservation in the joint Winterthur/University of Delaware Art Conservation Program. She served previously as head of paper conservation at the Conservation Center for Art and Historic... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Collection Care) Towards understanding the basis of Oddy test failures via quantitative volatile organics and other analytical analyses
We have been examining and testing a range of building, construction, and housing materials for their suitability and level of risk to a range of collection materials. Upon initial testing of proposed materials for use in two large construction/renovation projects, a substantial number of the materials were found to fail the standard Oddy metal coupon test, often in a rather unusual and/or spectacular manner. It should be noted that the original Oddy test focused on the impact on metal only, rather than considering the impact on other material compounds as the dose recipient (such as paper, parchment, polymers, etc.). We have been examining the compounds emitted by these construction and housing materials and how they interact/react with the metal coupons. Through the use of thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry, we are able to identify and quantify the compounds emitted from each material. In addition, other analytical tools are being utilized to examine what compounds are depositing or have reacted at the surface of the Oddy test coupons during exposure to elevated temperatures and humidity. Coordinating and comparing the chemical analyses with the results from the Oddy test are improving our ability to understand the mechanism(s) behind the failure of the Oddy test and, in turn, guide and speed material product selection. Testing of proposed materials aims to minimize risk to the collection but this risk often cannot be entirely removed by product choice alone. As a means of mitigating the residual risk from volatiles, we have also examinined and characterized commercially available sorbent materials for their selectivity, capacity, functionality and adsorption/desorption characteristics. This presentation will detail our on-going research using quantitative volatile organic compound analyses of building, construction, housing, and sorbent materials to further understand and minimize the risk to the range of materials in our collections during storage and exhibition.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Monroe

Eric Monroe

Supervisory Physical Scientist, Library of Congress
Dr. Eric Monroe is a Supervisory Physical Scientist in the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Libray of Congress. Dr. Monroe received his PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana in 2008. From there, he completed postdoctoral studies... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Fenella France

Fenella France

Library of Congress
avatar for Amanda Jones

Amanda Jones

Preservation Specialist, Library of Congress
Amanda Jones is a Preservation Specialist in the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress.
avatar for Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Cindy Connelly Ryan-[PA]

Preservation Science Specialist, Library of Congress
Cindy Connelly Ryan is a specialist in historic artists' practices with a background in physics (Carnegie-Mellon University) and art conservation (New York University). She held a Forbes Fellowship at the Freer/Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution before joining PRTD in... Read More →
avatar for Kelli Stoneburner

Kelli Stoneburner

Preservation Technician, Library of Congress
Kelli Stoneburner is a Preservation Technician in the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress.

Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Electronic Media) Introducing ‘Code Resituation’: Applying the Concept of Minimal Intervention to the Conservation Treatment of Software-based Art
This joint paper proposes a new treatment method for the conservation of software-based art that was developed as part of the ongoing research collaboration between the Guggenheim Conservation Department and the Department of Computer Science at New York University. The new treatment technique, termed “code resituation” by the authors, is tailored to serve artworks where code intervention is necessary to restore the artwork’s functionality. Traditional code migration, as practiced by computer programmers, includes the deletion and replacement of non-functional, original code. Intended behaviors and discernable output of an artwork would be recreated by means of contemporary programming languages, aiming for the most elegant and efficient programming solutions currently available. This traditional migration approach, the authors argue, has the potential to strip an artwork of some or all traces of the artist’s hand. His or her choice of programming language, artistic expression as seen through nuances in the source code and algorithmic detail, code annotations and unrealized drafts can all be lost in code migration. Code resituation, instead, aims to preserve the original artist’s code while adding conservation code to reanimate the original to full functionality. With the development of this new treatment approach, the authors apply the conservation principle of minimal intervention to the conservation of software-based art. The new method of code resituation was successfully tested on three artworks from the Guggenheim collection, which were treated in the course of the Guggenheim’s initiative “Conserving Computer-based Art”.

Speakers
avatar for Deena Engel

Deena Engel

Clinical Professor and Director, Program in Digital Humanities and Social Science, Department of Computer Science, New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences
Deena Engel is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences of New York University as well as the Director of the Program in Digital Humanities and Social Science. She teaches undergraduate computer science courses on... Read More →
avatar for Joanna Phillips

Joanna Phillips

Senior Conservator of Time-based Media, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Joanna Phillips is the Senior Conservator of Time-based Media at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, where she founded the media art conservation lab in 2008. At the Guggenheim, Phillips has developed and implemented new strategies for the preservation, reinstallation, and... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) Hot Tub Time Machine: A Heated Water System for Artifact Disassembly and Treatment
The conservation of complex composite artifacts can pose a real challenge for conservators. Different material types often require dissimilar treatment methods, which can be incompatible between materials, resulting in the potential to damage one while attempting to conserve another. Therefore, when determined necessary, the decision can be made to disassemble an object, treat component parts separately, and then reassemble after treatment. This approach can be especially difficult for objects recovered from archaeological sites. The effects of the burial environment can lead to the hardening and embrittlement of organic materials and corrosion and de-alloying of metals. In both scenarios, this can result in an inability to easily and safely take part archaeological objects requiring the development of new treatment techniques and procedures. Between 1998 and 2002, over 210-tons of artifacts from the wreck site of the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor were recovered off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina by archaeologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and US Navy divers. Many of the retrieved artifacts came from the vessel’s engine room which included five steam engines and an assortment of plumbing assemblies. Having spent nearly 140 years on the seafloor, the cast iron elements of these artifacts had de-alloyed through graphitic corrosion and now possessed the structural integrity of chalk. If that was not challenging enough, a majority of the “graphitized” objects had attached component parts which had become adhered together by rubber gaskets that had hardened having lost their elasticity over time. Early in the treatment of these artifacts, it was clear that some level of disassembly would be required so that organic, copper alloy, and iron alloy elements could receive independent treatment. However, any attempt to separate the objects into their component parts led to the cracking or breaking of the fragile “graphitized” material due to the rigidity of the gaskets. Fortunately for the conservation staff, during the application of a routine hot treatment technique used to removed concretion from copper alloy artifacts, it was discovered that a temperature of approximately 160 degrees Fahrenheit caused a previously hardened rubber gasket to soften an become pliable. This revelation led to the hypothesis that one potential solution to the disassembly conundrum could be to submerge the artifacts in a hot water bath and allow the transmission of heat to soften the gasket material; thus, limiting damage to the de-alloyed cast iron during disassembly. Additional experimentation to identify the effects of an elevated temperature on “graphitized” cast iron samples followed. Positive results from sample testing led to the design and construction of a heated water system and the development of a treatment procedure for artifact disassembly. This paper will provide an overview of the project and the operation the hot water tank apparatus. In addition, other potential treatment uses for the machine will be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for William Hoffman-[PA]

William Hoffman-[PA]

Director of Conservation and Chief Conservator, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Will Hoffman received his Master's degree in art conservation from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario in 2009 specializing in the conservation of objects. He received Bachelors' degrees in Anthropology (concentrating in North American and Historic Archaeology) and Fine Arts (concentrating... Read More →

Co-Authors
RS

Ralph Spohn

Conservation Department Volunteer, The Mariners' Museum and Park
Ralph Spohn holds a PhD Organometallic chemistry. He worked for a major petrochemical company for 28+ years. During this time he was involved in basic and applied research. He holds 10 patents. He developed and ran this company’s research analytical lab for 5 years. He was recognized... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Paintings) Material Matters Research for Rare Wall Murals revealed at the Historic Sinclair Inn Museum
In 2014 and 2016, Conservator Ann Shaftel enacted conservation treatment of recently discovered historic walls murals behind wallpaper at the 18th c. Sinclair Inn Museum, located in a former second floor function room. At least two layers of murals were found, the first comprising Masonic Lodge fluted columns painted in the four corners of the room, which may date to the late 18th or early 19th c. Subsequent layers of painting, done over the Masonic columns, comprise panoramic views on all four walls which appear to portray the Annapolis Basin in various scenes, together with a portrait of a man in Scottish military dress, believed to be painted in the 1830s or 1840s. Later painted details of Masonic iconography have also been identified. This room has written documentation as one of the oldest known Masonic meeting places in North America. In the Conservation Treatment of the fragile and unique wall murals, the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) was requested by the Annapolis Historical Association, the local community not-for-profit owner of the museum, to research and advise on the both the wall paintings and the historic structure that contain the paintings, prior to and during the work. Based on this research and conservation related advice, an understanding and appreciation of the properties of the materials of the building and its walls was developed which informed and guided the hands-on revealing and conservation treatment of the murals. Dating back to 1710, the building itself is the second oldest extant wood frame building in Nova Scotia and Canada, which is an open-concept museum today in which layers of history are revealed, with didactic labels, audio/visual interaction and local guides. The museum building itself is informed by materials and historic research. The conservation of the wall paintings was then prefaced by site visits, sampling and materials research carried out in the laboratory by Canadian Conservation Institute painting conservators and scientists, research that continued through the two years of the Conservator’s involvement in the hands-on process. Historic preservation specialists from CCI were twice invited to the site to research and advise on preservation measures for the building itself as well as for the murals once they were revealed. The range of materials research provided by CCI was augmented by simple on-site materials research undertaken by the conservator herself before and during the conservation treatment. Augmented chemical analysis on the wallpaper and pigments was provided by Saint Mary’s University Chemistry Department, for example the existence of arsenic in a wallpaper colour we were working with. This presentation demonstrates the vital importance of materials research for conservation treatment of multi-layered fragile wall paintings contained within an historic structure. Acknowledgements: Paul Marcon, Tom Strong, James Bourdeau, Jennifer Poulin, Elizabeth Moffatt, Dominique Duguay Report CCI 2015 Sinclair Inn Report 127794 Report CCI Final Technical Report Sinclair Inn 100351 Sinclair Inn Painted Room Report CCI 11-2011, Prof. Christa Brosseau, Department of Chemistry, Saint Mary’s University. 

Speakers
avatar for John Ward

John Ward

Preservation Development Advisor, Heritage Interiors, Canadian Conservation Institute
John Ward is trained as a built heritage conservation architect who has worked with the Heritage Conservation Directorate, PWGSC, between 1996 and 2009, focusing on providing advice on federal heritage buildings including those on Parliament Hill, and since 2010 has been a Preservation... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Emma Hartman

Emma Hartman

Fulbright Fellow, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts
Emma Hartman holds a BA in Chemistry and the History of Art from Amherst College, where she concentrated on the study of prints and manuscripts. She is currently a Fulbright-Nehru Student Researcher at the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts in New Delhi, India, where she conducting... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Photographic Materials) Color Records: Wood’s Diffraction Process of Color Photography
In 1899 American physicist Robert W. Wood invented a new three-color photographic process utilizing diffraction gratings of different grove spacing. While the process’s drawbacks, including the need for a special viewer, relegated it to the laboratory, the finished plates had the interesting property of displaying natural color without the use of pigments or dyes. The George Eastman Museum collection contains several plates from the inception of Wood’s process and more than a dozen from the brief period of commercialization in the first decade of the 20th century. For this project the history of the process was documented and variations within were recorded using photomicrography. A lens system based on original viewing apparatus was then constructed to enable the viewing and photo-documentation of all the images. As the plates rely solely on the diffraction of white light to produce color, the images captured appear essentially as they did when produced over 100 years ago.

Speakers
avatar for Zach Long

Zach Long

Assistant Conservator, George Eastman Museum
Zach Long is Assistant Conservator at the Kay R. Whitmore Conservation Center at the George Eastman Museum. He holds a Master of Arts and Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from Buffalo State, State University of New York and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photographic... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) Another Look at Conserving a Japanned High Chest
A growing awareness of East Asian influence in our Western world has spurred a reconsideration of many of the rare American Japanned objects from the first half of the 18th century. Among these is a sometimes celebrated high chest in the Art Museums collection at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (CWF). One of only about 15 such Japanned forms known, the bulk of the artistic merit of the cabinet lies in the decoration attributed to Robert Davis of Boston, around the 1730’s. Because the iconography of these—mainly Boston made—Japanned objects continues to be something of a mystery among many decorative arts scholars, the material make up has become the obvious necessary foundation to our understanding of such mannerist artistic expressions. In this paper the CWF high chest is presented with an eye toward understanding the original materials and design intent, as well as the reinterpretation of some of these lost and poorly restored elements. Like many of its cousins, this Japanned cabinet has seen several campaigns of restoration in its lifetime. With time, the raised ornament seems to have failed in many of these surfaces and the multiple restorations appear to have veered further from the maker’s vision with each campaign. Some attention will be paid to the choices of material and technique in the restorative process as well. The study and analyses that preceded the on-going treatment featured photography with visible light, ultra-violet, Infra-red, and x-ray. Analyses for materials identification featured X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, SEM with EDX, and visible and fluorescence cross-section microscopy. Combining the findings from these analytical techniques has provided a fairly comprehensive picture of the materials in the surface decoration. They have also revealed a few surprises in makeup, as well as a much-needed road map for the treatment protocol. The project reflects a vital collaboration between the CWF Analytical Lab and Wood Artifacts Lab. Insights gleaned from this exploration and treatment will hopefully inspire other owners to reconsider their objects with the hope of new exhibits and a better understanding of interpretation.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Swan

Christopher Swan

Senior Conservator, Furniture, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Chris is a furniture and wooden artifacts Conservator at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Virginia where he has been since February, 1999, and where he also completed his third-year graduate internship, and a Getty post-graduate internship from 1994-1996. In between positions... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Kirsten Moffitt-[PA]

Kirsten Moffitt-[PA]

Conservator & Materials Analyst, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Kirsten Travers Moffitt is a conservator of painted surfaces with a specialty in the microscopy and analysis of historic finishes. She received her B.F.A. in Fine Art from the State University of New York at Purchase in 1997, and spent the next eleven years working as a decorative... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

10:30am

(Textiles) The Use Of Paper-Based Materials For The Treatment Of Plant Fiber
The collection of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (AfricaMuseum) encompasses a broad range of objects that contain plant fibers. Those plant fibers are sensitive materials which can damage easily due to handling, light exposure and fluctuations in relative humidity and temperature. Consequently the fibers of the objects are often discolored, deformed or broken and multiple objects are actively shedding fibers or suffer from ‘baldness’.
Some plant fiber objects selected for exhibition in the renovated AfricaMuseum were too degraded to be displayed. The plant fibers were treated with paper materials in order to stabilize the objects and improve their readability. Multiple products can be grouped under the term ‘paper based Materials’, such as Japanese tissue, archival grade paper and cellulose pulp. These materials are not commonly used in textile conservation. The products have specific sets of characteristics  that can be applied to the divers treatments of objects, ranging from structural fills to thin protective coatings. Paper fibers are strong, light-weight, flexible and they can be toned with well-known conservation grade paints and dyes to mimic the appearances of the original object. The versatility of the paper based materials will be demonstrated through several treatments that are on the verge between the disciplines of textile, object and paper conservation.
This paper will focus on multiple case studies carried out by the conservation lab of the AfricaMuseum. For the treatment of two African plant fiber masks, Japanese tissue and Arbocel 400 were used for loss compensation and fiber support. Furthermore Japanese tissue has been used as a substitute for plant fiber cord, with well be documented through the treatment of a dance costume made from knotted plant fiber. Thick bands of Japanese paper also proved to be the ideal support for the support and stabilization of the woven plant fibers from a burial mat. An even thicker band of conservation grade paper paperboard was used to recreate pieces of the waistband from a skirt made out of thick plant fibers. A short overview will be given of other African objects that were treated with paper material such as drums, figurines and string instruments.
Japanese tissue, conservation grade archival paper and cellulose pulp have become staple materials in the conservation lab. The variety of the papers and cellulose pulp available is huge and their versatility can be even further adjusted by the choice of dye/paint and adhesives or through additions of other materials. Paper based materials have often proved to be the perfect fit for the treatment of the diverse collection of the AfricaMuseum; were conservation is a cross-discipline between objects, textile and paper conservation.

Speakers
avatar for Anoek De Paepe

Anoek De Paepe

Objects conservator, Royal Museum for Central Africa
Anoek De Paepe is an object conservator at the Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA) in Tervuren, Belgium. As the museum is being renovated, she is currently working on the preparing the objects for the reopening of the museum at the end of 2018. In 2016 she received her master’s... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Marieke van Es

Marieke van Es

Conservator, Royal Museum for Central Africa
Marieke van Es graduated at the University of Antwerp were she received her master degree in conservation and restoration. After graduating she started to work at the Fashion Museum in Antwerp. Since 2014 she is working at the RMCA were she is preparing the object for the renovated... Read More →
SG

Siska Genbrugge

Objects Conservator, Royal Museum for Central Africa
Siska Genbrugge is objects conservator at the Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA) in Tervuren, Belgium. Prior to her appointment at the RMCA she was assistant objects conservator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). Siska completed her MA degree in conservation as a... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Architecture) Transportation, Installation, and Conservation of the 20th c. fresco 'Haitian Massacre, 1937': Challenges, solutions, and contributions
The transportation and installation of the fresco mural Haitian Massacre, 1937, followed by its conservation, was not only challenging for the conservators but also for the engineers contracted for the project. The mural, created in 1974 by Dominican artists José Ramírez Conde and Roberto Flores, presented extensive damage from being hastily cut away from its original location and enduring three years of harsh environmental conditions after being left outdoors just covered by a tarp. Funded by the Ambassadors’ Fund for Cultural Preservation program, the project was lead by Dominican paintings conservator Hilda Abreu Utermohlen and U.S.-Argentinian Viviana Dominguez, mural conservator. The conservators took on the task of not only conserving the extensively damaged fresco, but also of advising on its preventive care, especially during its transportation from this exposed location to the Memorial Museum of the Dominican Resistance in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and subsequent installation in the museum, where it could be appreciated by the public. 
Throughout the project, the authors faced technical and logistical challenges, due to the large size and heavy weight of the fresco wall, its poor condition, the long travel route from its location to the museum, the narrow entrance to the museum, its maneuvering for affixing it to the installation base, limitations in the availability of trained professionals in mural conservation and supplies, as well as budget constrains. These challenges were ingeniously sorted out thanks to the efforts and teamwork of the conservators and engineers, resulting in the successful completion of the project. Utermohlen and Dominguez presented the examination, planning and preparation phases of the project during AIC 44th Annual Meeting in Montreal in 2015, as a work in progress. On this presentation the authors will describe the completion of the project, consisting of its transportation, installation, and conservation treatment, followed by the repair of building features and exhibit completion by the museum. Highlights include: the frame used for securing the large wall during the 14 km ride through the city and into the narrow streets of the Colonial City, and the methods used for bringing in the severely damaged wall and securing it in place. Also, they will detail the conservation treatment activities performed, including consolidation and loss compensation with local materials and techniques similar to those used by the artists. In the conclusion, they discuss and reflect on the results and benefits derived from this project, not only for the specific preservation of this artwork, but also as a tool to convey its multiple values. Moreover, the international nature of the assembled team provided not only an opportunity to collaborate hand in hand in the exchange of knowledge, but also to build bridges of understanding among the participants. 

Speakers
avatar for Viviana Dominguez-[PA]

Viviana Dominguez-[PA]

Senior Conservator, Art Conservators Lab LLC
Viviana Dominguez is a specialist in the conservation of large-scale works of art on public places, wall paintings, and easel paintings. She has worked in the field since 1983, preserving national and monuments, and international works. She has broad experience in a large variety... Read More →
avatar for Hilda Abreu Utermohlen-[Fellow]

Hilda Abreu Utermohlen-[Fellow]

Executive Director, Hilab
Hilda is founder and Executive Director of Hilab, a private art conservation firm in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. She has 28 years of experience working in the treatment of paintings and a wide range of art conservation services and consultations in her country and the Caribbean... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Book and Paper) John Singer Sargent: New insights into his watercolor materials and techniques
As imaging technology continues to be developed in the service of material identification and mapping, long-standing assumptions about artists’ media and processes can finally be tested. Analytical methods such as GC-MS, SERS, XRF mapping, and hyperspectral imaging represent opportunities to breath exciting new life into exhibitions of works by artists who have become perennial favorites. John Singer Sargent is one such artist on whom numerous tomes have been written and about whom it may seem there is nothing more to say. This talk will contradict that notion by presenting new insights into Sargent’s materials based on the coordination of close visual observation, scholarship, and material analysis using established scientific technqiues as well as techniques that have only recently become available such as hyperspectral imaging and macro-XRF mapping. The present exhibition John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age afforded the opportunity to conduct a technical study of eleven of Sargent’s watercolors at the Art Institute of Chicago. Though the sample set is small for such a prolific artist, the works span nearly forty years of the artist’s watercolor production. He sustained passion for the medium throughout his life and, as analysis revealed, he sometimes experimented by altering his media. These discoveries were made possible through collaboration between curators, conservators, and scientists who are innovators in fields ranging from computer science to spectroscopy. They stress the importance of establishing a scientific basis for claims made about artists’ processes, even if they originate from primary and secondary sources. This information adds to the extensive body of technical work that has already been published on the largest American collections of Sargent’s watercolors, namely those at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the Worcester Museum.

Speakers
avatar for Francesca Casadio

Francesca Casadio

Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist and Co-director NU-ACCESS, The Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University
Francesca Casadio joined the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003 to establish and direct a state of the art conservation science laboratory. In January 2018, she will assume the post of Executive Director of Conservation and Science in the same institution. Dr. Casadio has also established... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Agnese Babini

Agnese Babini

Visiting Graduate Student, NU-ACCESS, Northwestern University
Agnese Babini is a graduate student in Science for Conservation from the University of Bologna. She received her B.S in Technologies for Conservation of Cultural Heritage at the University of Bologna, with a thesis on the proposal of analytical protocols for the authentication... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Biolcati

Veronica Biolcati

intern, Technical Studies Research Laboratory, Getty Conservation Institute
Veronica Biolcati is an intern at the Technical Studies Research Laboratory of the Getty Conservation Institute. Her research interests include the investigation of the materials and techniques used for painting, the application of new methods and technologies for the scientific study... Read More →
avatar for Mary Broadway

Mary Broadway

Associate Paper Conservator, Art Institute of Chicago
Mary Broadway is the Associate paper conservator at the Art Institute of Chicago Additional Co-authors include: Mary Broadway, Veronica Biolcati, Ken Sutherland, Francesca Casadio, Emeline Pouyet, Agnese Babini, Gianluca Pastorelli, Danielle Duggins, Marc Walton
DD

Danielle Duggins

Graduate Student, Materials Science and Engineering, NU-ACCESS, Northwestern University
Danielle is a PhD student in Materials Science & Engineering at Northwestern and joined NU-ACCESS in August of 2017. Her research is focused on coupling optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral measurements for the identification of paint pigments. She received her BS in Physics... Read More →
avatar for Gianluca Pastorelli

Gianluca Pastorelli

Postdoctoral Fellow, Northwestern/ARTIC Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts
avatar for Emeline Pouyet

Emeline Pouyet

Post doctoral fellow, Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago
Emeline Pouyet is a post-doctoral fellow at the NU-ACCESS center (Chicago, U.S.A). She received her M.S. degree in Archaeometry in 2010 and completed her Ph.D. studies in 2014 at the ID21 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). Her activities focused... Read More →
KS

Ken Sutherland

Conservation Scientist, Art Institute of Chicago
Ken Sutherland is a scientist in the Department of Conservation and Science at the Art Institute of Chicago. He held previous positions as scientist in the Conservation Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Research Fellow in the Scientific Research Department of the National... Read More →
avatar for Marc Sebastian Walton

Marc Sebastian Walton

Co-Director, Research Professor, Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts
Marc Walton joined the Northwestern University / Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts in 2013 as its inaugural Senior Scientist and as a Research Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. In January of 2018, he was appointed... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston
  • Specialty Tracks Book and Paper
  • Cost Type Included with registration
  • Abstract ID 13827
  • Authors (in order) Mary Broadway, Veronica Biolcati, Ken Sutherland, Francesca Casadio, Emeline Pouyet, Agnese Babini, Gianluca Pastorelli, Danielle Duggins, Marc Walton

11:00am

(Collection Care) Evaluating the Potential of A-D Strips for Assessing the Safety of Materials for Museum Objects
This presentation will deliver the results of experiments designed to evaluate how A-D Strips, originally developed to quantify the condition of cellulose acetate film, can be applied to detecting other forms of acidic off-gassing as well. Organic carbonyls are found in a variety of materials including adhesives, wood and laminates, flooring, paints, and textiles used in the storage, display, and transport of objects. Acetic and formic acids are believed to be the primary risks to cultural heritage materials from organic carbonyl pollutants, whether directly emitted from a source or oxidized from the aldehyde forms acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. These pollutants are particularly damaging to metals such as lead and copper and calcareous materials (in the form of Byne’s Disease), but can also affect a range of other acid-sensitive materials.

Monitoring for the presence of organic carbonyls is currently limited because the methods for doing so (primarily diffusion tubes) can be expensive to employ. A-D Strips though provide a relatively quick, easy, and inexpensive way and because of this, they have been used in a wide variety of applications: for monitoring of collections, to check the effectiveness of mitigation measures, to evaluate housing seals, and to confirm whether or not products are off-gassing in a version of an Oddy-like test.

In order to use the strips informatively where other acids aside from acetic are present, experiments will be conducted to develop a scale describing the response of the strip to the presence of formic acid. While A-D Strips will continue to react in the presence of any acid so that it will not be possible to identify whether the color changes are due to acetic, formic, or another acid, experiments into their reaction to formic acid will help to add to our scientific understanding of how the strips should be applied in contexts where another organic carbonyl is the concern. With additional testing, this tool can be appropriately used to perform preliminary screening of materials to be used in collection spaces as a complementary procedure to Oddy testing, as well as potentially inform their utilization in a broader range of applications for collections degradation and pollutant monitoring. 

Speakers
KM

Kelly McCauley Krish

Preventive Conservation Specialist, Image Permanence Institute
Kelly McCauley Krish, Preventive Conservation Specialist, joined IPI in May 2016 as part of the environmental management consulting team and to provide other preventive services. Kelly earned her MS in Art Conservation from the Winterthur- University of Delaware Program and a BA in... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Jean-Louis Bigourdan

Jean-Louis Bigourdan

Senior Research Scientist, Image Permanence Institute, Rochester Institute of Technology
Jean-Louis Bigourdan is a senior research scientist at the Image Permanence Institute (IPI), Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York, USA. He has a background in Chemistry, photography and conservation of photographic materials. He received his diploma in the conservation... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Electronic Media) Revealing Hidden Processes: Instrumentation and Reverse Engineering in the Conservation of Software-based Art
Software-based artworks possess a curious material status. While rooted in bits stored on a physical medium, they can also be considered performative and ephemeral in that the tangible elements of such works are created on-the-fly when the software is executed. When realised, the artwork is experienced primarily in relation to the experiential elements of the performance (i.e. its inputs and outputs). However, the conservator must also understand the underlying mechanism of code being processed in a technical environment: a challenge which has required the development of new analytical approaches. Source code analysis provides one means of addressing this layer, and has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach to understanding software programs through the close study of the code they were written in. However, this approach might not be suitable in all scenarios. While source code relates closely to the compiled software, the process of transformation involved means that equivalence between the two is not always direct or clear. Where source code presents high levels of complexity, it may not be possible (or even necessary) to find the resources to carry out in-depth source code analysis. In a worst case scenario, source code is simply missing or inaccessible. Furthermore, elements of performance linked to the software's interaction with its technical environment can often not be completely understood or measured through source code alone. In this paper, I explore methods that intercept the software performance and directly address the compiled software in order to derive useful conservation information. In these cases analytical and interrogative approaches from software engineering may be repurposed to reveal hidden computational processes, profile performance, log events and decompile code. Careful analysis of information gathered can yield important insights for conservation, including elucidating complex dependencies, revealing unclear program behaviours and ensuring that significant characteristics of the software performance can be maintained. This paper will report on the application of these approaches to software-based artworks from the Tate collection. In doing so I reach some overarching conclusions regarding the potential and limitations of these novel methods in relation to existing approaches, and argue for their place in the toolbox of the time-based media conservator.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Ensom

Tom Ensom

Digital Conservator, Tate / King's College London
Tom Ensom is a London-based digital conservator, and is currently in the final stages of his PhD at King's College London, which has been undertaken in collaboration with Tate. His PhD research has developed approaches to the analysis, description and representation of software-based... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) ‘All That Is Gold Does Not Glitter’: Developing Guidelines for the Recovery of Tin-plate on Mineralized Archaeological Iron through Material Analysis
X-radiographs are important guides for the air abrasive cleaning of archaeological iron. What happens then when an important feature, such as a finishing surface, recorded by an x-radiograph fails to materialize? Is this merely human error on the part of the conservator? Can the x-radiographic signatures of these surfaces be caused by other factors? Or have residual finishing surfaces simply degraded past the point of un-assisted visual detection? This presentation will discuss how the combination of spectral imaging and elemental analysis can contribute to x-radiographic interpretations of non-ferrous finishing surfaces on archaeological iron and inform decisions as to the practical recovery of such surfaces. Tinned surfaces are fairly ubiquitous in the archaeological record and are frequently documented in x-radiographs. Actual recovery of these surfaces, however, is under-reported in academic literature. Due to the nature of tin corrosion and its products, tin-plate is often assumed to be a visually discrete, recoverable surface. This is an assumption seemingly supported by the presence of distinct areas of differential density known as ‘tinning lines’ on x-radiographs. However, the extent to which these lines reflect the actual condition of the underlying tinned surface and can predict the success of practical recovery is not well documented. This is especially true in the context of highly mineralized artifacts in which metallic tin may no longer exist. The aim of this project is to positively identify and characterize presumptive tinning surfaces on a highly-mineralized iron artifact using SEM-BEI imaging and SEM-EDX elemental analysis to corroborate x-radiographic and optical microscopy evidence of tinning. This project uses an archaeological wrought iron key dating from the late medieval period of the deserted English village of West Whelpington as its subject. Previous conservation indicates that the artifact was likely tinned. The validity of this identification is tested through a) producing an array of x-radiographs that explore variables, such as penetrative power, exposure time and geometry to confirm the presence of tinning lines, b) performing investigative cleaning via air abrasion to test recoverability of the layer based on x-radiographs, and c) sectioning the key and using spectral analysis techniques to better chemically and physically describe and corroborate the presumptive finishing surface. The presentation will also use SEM micrographs and SEM-EDX mapping to illustrate the distribution of highly mineralized tin layers in the corrosion matrix and discuss the extent to which these morphological changes can be detected in x-radiographs and used as signifiers of surface condition. Ultimately, this will prompt commentary as to what constitutes a recoverable surface and what factors a conservator will need to take into account, such as, stakeholders, work constraints, and artifact ‘value’, etc. when making decisions about whether or not to attempt recovery of a finishing surface that is analytically distinct but not necessarily visually or physically identifiable. Much like “all that is gold does not glitter” this paper will demonstrate that not all things of value are strictly material.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Crepeau

Michelle Crepeau

Conservator, North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources
Michelle Crepeau is a Master's degree recipient recently returned from studying abroad at Cardiff University, Wales, following the completion of an MSc. in Conservation Practice with a focus on archaeological and object conservation. She has additional undergraduate qualifications... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Nicola Emmerson

Nicola Emmerson

Lecturer in Conservation, Cardiff University, School of History, Archaeology and Religion
avatar for David Watkinson

David Watkinson

Professor (Conservation)/ Deputy Head of School, School of History, Archaeology and Religion, Cardiff University

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Paintings) An Obscured Beauty: analysis and treatment of "Dancing Girl" by Muhammad Baqir
In 2015 The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston acquired Muhammad Baqir's "Dancing Girl" dated 1192 AH (1778 AD), their first Islamic easel painting. While Baqir is primarily known for his miniature painting, this oil on canvas work is roughly 59 inches tall, 31 inches wide, with an arched top, and features a 3/4 size portrait of a female dancer. The subject is dressed in a patterned skirt with jeweled bodice holding castanets in both hands, with one arm raised above her head. She stands before an open window with a typical landscape behind and a bowl of pears to the side. Baqir was one of the first Persian painters to incorporate European motifs and techniques into his works, and his use of perspective in particular shows the intersection between West and East. Large canvas paintings are rare for this late Zand period and few of them have been studied in depth. As the techniques and materials of miniature painting do not always translate to larger works, analysis of Baqir's materials and methods in this painting compared to his smaller compositions contributes to a greater understanding of Persian oil painting in general. Immediately after acquisition research on the painting began to aid in the overall treatment. The painting has been examined with UVF and IRR imaging along with X-radiographs. Analysis was performed using XRF and FTIR, dispersed and cross sectional samples including fiber identification of the canvas, as well as SEM-EDX. The work has been lined and treated at least twice in the past, although no conservation records are extant. Analysis shows several layers of shellac applied throughout the years and it is speculated the painting had never before been thoroughly cleaned. Overall the surface exhibited a thick plastic appearance detracting from its dynamic qualities. Additionally the severe yellowing of the coating distorted the color relationships of the composition and obscured any subtleties of shading. Cleaning the painting was undertaken with caution as several areas contain vermillion, which proved to be sensitive to any solvents strong enough to solubilize the shellac. The jeweled decorations in the dancer's costume are composed of metal flakes with painted details on top. These areas are likewise extremely delicate and could not be cleaned with solvents. The cleaning therefore consisted of two phases. First using appropriate organic solvents in any non-sensitive areas, then the remainder of the painting was slowly cleaned mechanically. The painstaking cleaning revealed beautiful delicacies in the technique and restored much of the original aesthetic. Older campaigns of retouching and over-painting were also removed and new compensation was completed in a more discreet manner. The investigation and treatment of "Dancing Girl" provided important insights into the painting materials and techniques of the late Zand/early Qajar period as well as several practical methodologies for their continued preservation. The knowledge gained from this project regarding larger Persian oil paintings on canvas is an invaluable addition to Western conservation circles.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Gardner-[PA]

Melissa Gardner-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Melissa Gardner is the Associate Conservator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston where she has worked for the past seven years in various roles.She is a graduate of the Conservation Center, IFA NYU primarily specializing in Old Master easel paintings. During her time... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Dr. Corina E. Rogge-[PA]

Dr. Corina E. Rogge-[PA]

Andrew W. Mellon Research Scientist, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Corina E. Rogge is the Andrew W. Mellon Research Scientist at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Menil Collection. She earned a B.A. in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College, a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Yale University and held postdoctoral positions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Photographic Materials) The Chemistry of Digital Fine Art Paper Yellowing: A Comparative Case Study of Moab Entrada Rag Natural 300gsm and Harman Inkjet Glossy Art Fibre Warmtone by Hahnemühle
The yellowing of inkjet papers is a documented problem for cultural institutions and the conservation community. This study investigated two commercially available inkjet papers that had yellowed naturally under different conditions. A double-coated fine art paper Moab Entrada Natural 300gsm, developed a yellow stain within one year of printing, after unprotected exposure to light and atmospheric pollutants in a home environment. A roll of Harman Inkjet glossy fine art fibre warmtone paper by Hahnemühle yellowed when the packaging material, a polyethylene bag, was in contact with the paper during shipping. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and UV-VIS reflection measurements were used to characterize the naturally yellowed papers. Attempts were also made to purposefully drive the yellowing reactions in fresh samples of these papers. Fresh paper samples were exposed separately to short wave UV light, long wave UV light, and NO₂ gas (to simulate atmospheric pollution). The SEM of the cross sectioned papers revealed complex microstructure in the coatings of the papers. Chemical analyses suggest that neither UV nor NO₂ exposure alone were the sole reason of the naturally yellowed paper. The pattern of chemical changes from XPS line scans of cross sections of the naturally yellowed paper suggested that the cause of the yellowing was diffusing into the paper making atmospheric pollutants a more likely cause. We suggest that the increased porosity of inkjet papers may have made them more susceptible to oxidizing gases in atmospheric pollution or outgassing from packaging materials as compared to more traditional paper formulations.

Speakers
avatar for Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Monique C. Fischer-[Fellow]

Senior Photograph Conservator, Northeast Document Conservation Center
Monique C. Fischer is the senior photograph conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) in Andover, MA.  She holds a master’s degree in art conservation from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum, and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Smith College... Read More →

Co-Authors
SB

Savannah Butler

Student, Harvard University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
avatar for Carew Giberson Chen

Carew Giberson Chen

Student, Harvard University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
Student at Harvard University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology.
avatar for Arthur McClelland

Arthur McClelland

Principal Scientist, Harvard University - Center for Nanoscale Systems
Arthur McClelland received his PhD in applied physics from the University of Michigan in 2009. He has worked at the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University since 2011 running the optical spectroscopy laboratory.
avatar for Nina Shevzov Zebrun

Nina Shevzov Zebrun

Student, Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology
VZ

Vanya Zvonar

Student, Harvard University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Hunters Creek Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Textiles) The Hidden Codex, A discussion of loss of cultural heritage of the history and religion of indigenous people and its impact on Mesoamerican studies through the examination of a possible newly discovered original Mixtec codex.
Kelly Gross, Midwestern Epigraphic Society Editor, 5-year AIC Member. The problem is that historically significant artifacts are being ignored and their cultural heritage lost. This occurs largely because of the difficulty some, but not all, experts have in recognizing the value in something new or undiscovered. The Hidden Codex is a case in point. This artifact is a single work on plaster and fiber mat in vivid color likely by a single artist and measures 122 cm by 30.5cm. It has been well researched. Carbon dated at 1650 C E, the codex pigments were made from all natural materials in the La Mixteca region of Oaxaca in Mexico. Previously unknown, it is not one of the only eight known Mixtec codex artifacts in the world but instead represents the only Mixtec divinatory almanac, referred to as a Tonalamatl, now known to exist. It portrays five deities and is calendrical in nature with borders of the traditional 13- day pictorial sequencing as seen in some of the other 8 known Mixtec codex examples. But unlike the others it portrays the rituals and festivals of the indigenous religion. Normally other researchers would continue to study and duplicate the findings. Instead, what is happening is that a cultural history is being lost in an attempt to enforce a traditional orthodoxy: That no new codex artifacts can be discovered. Any attempts to contradict this thinking are met with claims from the archeology establishment that the authors are promoting reproductions or forgeries. This paper explores the Hidden Codex research on both sides and presents an objective picture including provenance documents of source location and history. Insight is provided into the codex’s pictorial use of calendar-based events and rituals on a cultural basis. Finally, the results of EDS and FTIR analytical testing are presented along with pigment photomicrographs and a discussion of the indigenous construction and its importance historically. The significance of this research is that it presents what could possibly be the only known codex that was never in the hands of the Spanish. This paper also presents the possibility that the indigenous people continued to practice their religion under Spanish occupation, contrary to popular opinion.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly H. Gross

Kelly H. Gross

Editor, Midwestern Epigraphic Society
Kelly H. Gross is a five year AIC member, has served as The Midwestern Epigraphic Society Newsletter editor, and has been involved in numerous technical research projects and assignments. Through his consulting work Mr Gross has been fortunate to engage with professionals in education... Read More →

Co-Authors
LJ

Loren Jeffries

Research analyst, Hidden Codex Properties, LLC
Roger Sexton and Loren Jeffries have both authored books on the subject of ancient mesoamerican artifacts and culture and are founding members of the Midwetern Epigraphic Society. Mr Jeffries book,"The Sacred Count: The Fractal Calendar of Ancient Meso-America" – November 20, 2016... Read More →
avatar for Roger Sexton

Roger Sexton

Research analyst, Hidden Codex Properties, LLC
Roger Sexton and Loren Jeffries have both authored books on the subject of ancient mesoamerican artifacts and culture and are founding members of the Midwetern Epigraphic Society. Mr Jeffries book,"The Sacred Count: The Fractal Calendar of Ancient Meso-America" – November 20, 2016... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
River Oaks Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:00am

(Research and Technical Studies + Wooden Artifacts) Bringing back color: Retouching faded furniture with colored light
Throughout the centuries organic colorants, both from natural and synthetic origin, were used to stain wood. This application lead to vivid colored objects of which the wood texture is still visible. Colorants can be applied over the complete surface of an object or used especially for marquetry, resulting in multi-colored objects. In addition to the coloring of wood, the natural color of unstained wood plays also an important role in the overall appearance of furniture. The main disadvantage of the use of organic colorants is the fact that they can severely fade in time, this is also true for the natural color of wood. As a consequence, the original appearance is lost to such extent that many museum visitors are not even aware of the fact that numerous pieces of furniture were originally colored; the visitors appreciate the natural, discolored wood and knowledge of how these objects originally looked like is sometimes completely ignored. To obtain knowledge about the original appearance is a great challenge, and it is good to realize that we will never be able to get the ‘exact’ colors right. However, more insight is required to be able to come as close as possible to the original intention of the makers of these objects. To revive this knowledge is only possible with an integrated approach. With this presentation, this integrated approach will be discussed. The research involves chemical analysis of the faded material, which is a challenge on its own, to identify the colorants used. The next step is the study of historical recipes and the creation of reconstructions (small mock-ups) based on these recipes to obtain more knowledge of the range of colors possible with the materials used. Degradation research is carried out on some of these colorants to understand their behavior. Finally, faded pieces of furniture were retouched using colored light, projecting a computer image via a beamer on the object in which the faded colors were revived. Although a promising technique, with possibilities to show these original vibrant objects to a large audience, questions arise about the accuracy of the reconstructed colors and the possible change in artistic value. However, it stimulates the discussion between curators, conservators and scientists about the possibilities and limitation of this technique and how to present the objects to the museum audience. Two case studies will be discussed. A group of objects designed by the Dutch architect Piet Kramer in the 1930’s which were originally stained with brilliant synthetic dyes and are now heavily discolored were accurately examined and these results will be presented. In addition, preliminary results will be discussed about the retouching of a much more complicated 18th century commode created by Andries Bongen.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Dr. Maarten R. van Bommel

Prof. Dr. Maarten R. van Bommel

Professor of Conservation Science, University of Amsterdam, conservation and restoration of cultural heritage
Maarten van Bommel is professor of conservation science at the university of Amsterdam, were he held a position both at the faculty of Humanities and the faculty of Science. He is chair of the section conservation and restoration of cultural heritage were future conservators / restorers... Read More →

Co-Authors
avatar for Federica van Adrichem

Federica van Adrichem

Trainee in conservation and restoration of cultural heritage, University of Amsterdam
JB

Jaap Boonstra

Conservator wood and furniture, Amsterdam museum

Friday June 1, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

(Objects + Archaeological Conservation) Measuring the burial microenvironment on an archaeological site as an aid to the conservation management of artifacts in the museum
Preliminary results will be presented from an in-situ assessment of the chemical microenvironment of an Early Bronze Age site in Central Anatolia. The work involved assessing the pH, the redox potential and chloride ion activity and was carried out in August 2017 on the soil of the Kaman-Kalehöyük excavation site in Turkey of the Japanese Institute of Anatolian Archaeology to ascertain the changes that occur in the burial and post excavation environment. A chloride ion electrode, pH meter, and corrosion meters with appropriate reference electrodes and calibrating materials were used. Surface chloride and pH mapping was carried out on excavated copper alloy objects and correlated with the archaeological profiles and records. Initial measurements indicate that it will be possible to prepare a degradation and conservation index as part of a mechanism to determine on a systematic basis corrosion behavior and which objects are in greatest need of conservation intervention. Treatment priority score cards will be prepared based on the significance and conservation needs assessments.

Speakers
avatar for Ian D. MacLeod

Ian D. MacLeod

Fellow, Western Australian Maritime Museum
Ian D. MacLeod completed his studies at the University of Melbourne in 1974 and did post-doctoral work at the University of Glasgow (Scotland) and Murdoch University (Perth, Australia). From 1978 he worked for the conservation department at the Western Australian Museum and developed... Read More →
avatar for Alice Boccia Paterakis-[Fellow]

Alice Boccia Paterakis-[Fellow]

Director of Conservation, Japanese Institute of Anatolian Archaeology
A MAC graduate of the Queen’s University conservation program, Alice received her PhD in conservation from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, in 2011. She served as Director of Conservation for the Athenian Agora of the American School of Classical Studies... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:30am - 11:45am
Texas Ballroom B Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

(Architecture) Analyzing Spanish colonial pigment utilizing sophisticated technology: The excitement and the obstacle in the discoveries
Traditional conservation techniques first uncovered the existence of Spanish colonial era frescoes on the interior walls of the Sacristy, in the Alamo Church, eighteen years ago. The stencil designs discovered encompass the entire room; at wainscot level, frieze band above entry doors, and along the arches of walls. The universal conservation lab techniques and analysis provided some of the answers however, there is still much to learn about the wall art in the Sacristy. Recently, conservation work in the Sacristy began and more evident questions arose; one inquiry: Is there another way of analyzing the pigment without removal? The answer is to this question is yes, by utilizing traditional analysis and state of the art technology. Through the use of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF), the pigments that remained on the walls in the Sacristy were sampled and characteristic elements were identified. The 2000 paint analysis report identified four Spanish colonial tinted limewashes. The recent utilization of the pXRF analysis report, identified three unknown Spanish colonial tinted limewashes and metal leaf with high levels of copper. In addition to the pXRF, a scanning electron microscope, SEM with EDS capabilities was also used on selected sampled fragments. Elemental maps confirm the identification of vermillion (HgS). This advanced technology helps guide conservation efforts and leaves the microscopic historic elements intact. A second inquiry transpired: How do we visually see the invisible design elements? By employing multi-spectral imaging with ultraviolet florescence technical photography, 3-D photographic techniques: Reflectance Transformational Imaging (RTI) and DSLR photogrammetry were also a part of this project. The multi-spectral imaging documented invisible design elements, important application techniques; “pouncing”, “outlining”, and “block filling”. The multi-spectral imaging created high-resolution images along with 3-D models and photo mosaics. A third inquiry loomed: Why the sophisticated equipment used did not determine the shapes of areas where high levels of Lead (Pb) exist at the “tips” of an invisible floral design? The floral designs are located symmetrically on the original walls. The invisible floral designs contain an urn painted with ochre, reds and copper green. The shape of the urn is unknown. The project utilizing multi-spectral imaging and portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy results were exciting, but some of the unknown Spanish colonial designs remain a mystery. Is there a technology that can solve the mysteries in the Sacristy at the Alamo?

Speakers
avatar for Pamela Rosser-[PA]

Pamela Rosser-[PA]

Conservator, The Alamo
Pamela Jary Rosser PA AIC is native to San Antonio. She grew up in the art and architecture world. She graduated with a degree in fine art and a minor in art history from the University of Incarnate Word. She studied art history in Italy and is a Professional Associate of the American... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Texas Ballroom C Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

(Book and Paper) Multi Spectral Imaging and the Digitization of the Dead Sea Scrolls
The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS)in the Judean seventy years ago, is considered one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern times. The scrolls were either written or copied in the Land of Israel between 250 BCE and 68 CE. They represent the oldest written record of the Old Testament, and contain the earliest copies of every book of the Bible, except one. This “Ancient Library” allows us to peer into a period, 2000 years ago, pivotal to both Judaism and Christianity. Thanks to these remarkable texts, our knowledge concerning the origins of Judaism and early Christianity has been greatly enriched. Issues of publication, conservation, preservation and documentation of the DSS have concerned both scholars and conservators ever since the scrolls’ discovery. The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), first embarked on this ambitious project of multi spectral imaging as yet another conservation effort, but it very soon it evolved into an overall project that is gradually changing DSS research environment and methodology. I will begin with a general overview presenting a short historical assessment of the state of preservation and documentation of the scrolls and their availability to the public and to the scholarly community before this project began. The presentation will discuss in depth the technology and sciences involved in the imaging, the development of a noninvasive monitoring system based on the multi spectral images for following the state of preservation of the scrolls; the creation of highest-quality color images and advanced near infra-red images for public and scholarly use; the online digital library, open access, computer generated tools, algorithms, virtual work-spaces, and new studies resulting from these best possible images. Finally, I shall briefly survey future objectives and challenges we still face. The Dead Sea Scrolls are a universal cultural heritage. As such, it is our duty to safeguard and preserve them for future generations while sharing them with the public and scholarly community worldwide.

Speakers
avatar for Ashlyn Oprescu

Ashlyn Oprescu

Conservator, Israel Antiquities Authority



Friday June 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

(Collection Care) Collaborative Project Between Museums - The Case Study of The National Museum of Taiwan Literature and Zhong Lihe Memorial Institute
In 2017,The National Museum of Taiwan Literature (NMTL) began a new project that focuses on preserving the collections of local museums by providing both collections management and preventative conservation education. The local museum staff will have the ability to preserve their collection independently through this project. The project has produced trilateral benefits on national museums, local museums and the public. The NMTL is the first national literary museum in Taiwan that works toward displaying the history of Taiwan literature and teaching civilians about their own historical literature. As the first official literary museum, the NMTL has the responsibility responsibility to assist and guide other local literary museums in developing and preserving Taiwan literature. The Zhong Lihe Memorial Institute ( ZLMI) is the first unofficial local literary museum established by a private legal institute, which occupies an important position in the field of Taiwan literature. The ZLMI houses not only the collections of significant Taiwanese authors, but specifically the collections of its namesake, Zhong Lihe. The collections provide evidence of Taiwan literary history and its developments. However, shortage of funds and lack of professional knowledge has left a gap in collections care. Their collections suffered because of an unsuitable storage environment and resource shortages. Due to this situation and the historic significance of the collection, the NMTL decided to use its greater funds and large professional staff to assist them in preserving their collections. During this project, we helped ZLMI to improve staff abilities in collection management by contributing our resources, such as professional knowledge, experiences and resources of preservation. We planned a series of programs helping them to develop collection management skills including improving their own collection system, teaching preservation and conservation knowledge, and improving the museum environment. Furthermore, the new collection system will now allow the staff to know the condition and the total amount of their objects. Secondly, we held education seminars to give local museum staff basic ideas about preservative conservation. Last but not least, we built a database of the ZLMI collection by digitally recording whole script collections. As a result the collections can be promoted and applied for research and education across Taiwan. The results show unparalleled success. Now the ZLMI has a comprehensive collection system. In addition, the staff have improved professional skills and management abilities to preserve collections. As for the NMTL, we now have access to the research resource of the ZLMI digital database collection. The case of collaboration with ZLMI is the first stage for a large-scale collaborative project, and the success of the ZLMI collaboration will be used to enact similar methods to assist other local literary museums in the future. As a result, NMTL can not only establish long-term collaborative partnership between NMTL and local museums, but also aid in the preservation of Taiwan’s literary history.

Speakers
JJ

Jen Jung Ku

Senior Paper Conservator, National Museum of Taiwan Literature
Jen Jung Ku received a MA in paper conservation from the Tainan National University of the Arts Tainan National University of the Arts (2010). She undertook advanced internships and additional training at the George Eastman House and Library and Archives Canada .She is presently senior... Read More →
avatar for Chi-Chun Lin

Chi-Chun Lin

Object conservator, YL Conservation Studio
Chi-Chun Lin has worked an assistant conservator at National Museum of Taiwan Literature (NMTL) since 2015. She has managed three projects assisting museum staffs in NMTL to do object catalogue and management. In 2013, the Staffordshire Hoard Conservation team at the Birmingham Museum... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Meyerland Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

(Electronic Media) Establishing Preservation Practices for Net Art and App-Based Works
Over the years, efforts by libraries, archives, and museums to incorporate digital media artworks into their collections has grown increasingly complex. The vast amount of born-digital art output is changing traditional approaches to archiving, collection building, and preservation. The National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art) is an IMLS-funded initiative created to address the challenges of digital preservation while fostering career development for new professionals. Coral Salomón is the NDSR Art resident at the University of Pennsylvania’s Fisher Fine Arts Library where she is focusing on the preservation of arts-related apps and websites, as well as providing repository recommendations for born-digital artworks. During this presentation, Coral will highlight some of the outcomes of her residency, focusing specifically on app and website preservation. She will discuss tools, strategies, and resources needed to capture web- and app- based art. The presentation will include challenges encountered, lessons learned, and “real world” applications of the recommended processes. It will also cover strategies for communicating the importance of preserving and providing access to this content to potential collaborators such as curators, gallery owners, and artists. This session is intended for individuals beginning to establish a web archiving program at their institutions, who are currently preserving this type of dynamic and ephemeral content, or that are interested in a walk-through to this subject matter.

Speakers
avatar for Coral Salomón

Coral Salomón

National Digital Stewardship Resident in Art Information, University of Pennsylvania
Coral is the NDSR Art Resident at the University of Pennsylvania. She is exploring preservation issues surrounding born-digital art and art resources. Coral is a MLIS grad from Mayagüez, PR. Previously, she worked at the Frick Art Reference Library and at the Center for Puerto Rican... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Briargrove Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

(Paintings) Symbol, Record, Object: Treating the many facets of two Qajar Iran imperial portraits
This paper discusses the treatment of two life-size portrait paintings in the collection of The Smithsonian Institution, Sackler Gallery of Art: the 1859 three-quarter length portrait of Prince Jalal al-Din, son of Fath Ali Shah by Abu’l Hasan Ghaffari, and the 1915 full-length painting of Ahmad Shah and his Cabinet by Ustad Assadallah al-Husayni Naqqash-bashi. Both paintings are powerful examples of how Iranian artists responded to the influences of Western portraiture while maintaining a unique sense of stylized line and pattern. Each painting required structural and cosmetic treatment, with treatment goals including reversing extensive previous treatment and preparing the painting for exhibition. As symbols of the importance of these men, the portrait of Prince Jalal al-Din is unique in the artist’s exceptional rendering and adherence to a very traditional 19th century portrait presentation, while the group portrait of Ahmad Shah, standing in front of his brother and ten members of his cabinet, was clearly influenced by contemporary photographs. Historical record was further presented in Ahmad Shah’s painting by the later addition of inscriptions identifying the men, and the replacement of the original dated artist’s signature at the bottom of the image. Examination and treatment of Ahmad Shah’s painting sought to place these inscriptions in context with other restorations, and to inpaint damages to balance visual unity of the image with the evidence of the painting as historical document. The materials and construction of each painting also greatly influenced the recent conservation treatments. The earlier portrait of Prince Jalal al-Din had a very traditional, Western painting construction of stretched, pre-primed linen canvas. Later restorations followed with lining and large areas of fill and restoration. Although the present treatment reversed most of the earlier treatment, it still followed a traditional path of re-lining, filling and inpainting. The later painting of Ahmad Shah had a simpler, less conventional construction, and was painted on seamed sections of thin, cotton fabric with no preparatory ground. Later repairs included small local patches and isolated restorations more in keeping with a hanging textile than a traditional stretched painting. The present treatment included a modified padded panel/stretcher support which would allow an easel painting presentation while retaining the irregularities of the seamed support fabric. Both treatments were informed by the accumulated histories of the paintings and the desire to respectfully preserve their very different constructions while enabling the vitality of the subjects to be present to the viewer.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Pollak-[Fellow]

Nancy Pollak-[Fellow]

Conservator, Art Care Associates
Nancy Pollak is a 1991 MS Graduate of the Winterthur / University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation where she majored in painting conservation with a special emphasis in painted textiles. She also holds a BFA in painting from Seton Hill College. In 1996 she established her private... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Texas Ballroom A Marriott Marquis Houston

11:30am

12:00pm

(Book and Paper) 2018 Book and Paper Wiki Discussion Session
The Book and Paper Wiki is a collaborative knowledge base of conservation techniques that belongs to all of us. Please come to the 2018 Book and Paper Wiki Discussion Session to keep updated about its progress. We will acknowledge the people who have made contributions, demonstrate new and improved Wiki pages, and gather suggestions for improvement on the Drying and Flattening chapter. Attendees will be invited to comment what the Wiki should focus on in 2018-2019.

The 2017 Book and Paper Wiki Discussion Session in Chicago provided energy, inclusion, and focus to the continuing effort to make the Wiki as relevant as possible. We discussed reformatting and updating chapters; how to deal with outdated (historical) treatments, materials, and terminology; and the importance of including images and videos. With the help of a group of volunteers, we have been following through on your input with great success.

This has been the best year yet for the Book and Paper Wiki.  Let's keep the momentum going. The feedback that we receive during these sessions is invaluable in planning for the future of the Book and Paper Wiki and maintaining an engaged and active membership.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Kelly-[PA]

Katherine Kelly-[PA]

Senior Book Conservator, Library of Congress
Katherine Kelly is a Senior Book Conservator at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Previously, she has worked at the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, the National Archives, Iowa State University, Harvard University, and Cornell University. She received her MS in Information... Read More →
avatar for Denise Stockman-[PA]

Denise Stockman-[PA]

Associate Conservator of Paper, New York Public Library
Prior to coming to NYPL, Denise was a fellow at the Morgan Library and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She interned at a variety of institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Barnes Foundation, and the National Galleries of Scotland; and was a technician... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Texas Ballroom D Marriott Marquis Houston

12:00pm

(Wooden Artifacts) Wooden Artifacts Group Business Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Genevieve Bieniosek-[PA]

Genevieve Bieniosek-[PA]

Furniture Conservator, Biltmore Estate
Genevieve Bieniosek is a furniture conservator at Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina, and is currently serving as Chair of the Wooden Artifacts Group. She is an AIC Professional Associate, and holds M.A. and Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from Buffalo State... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Kingwood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

12:00pm

(Private Practice) The Science of Things: Theory and Practice for Obtaining Independent Technical Results (Part II)
Limited Capacity seats available

This two-day program will address issues and solutions for obtaining analytical results and material identification for conservators who do not have access to technical equipment or scientific expertise in their studios or laboratories.

This panel discussion will include presentations and discussion on the various models for offering analytical services as well as the pros/cons, ethical and logistical considerations for conducting this kind of research. Speakers will represent various aspects of the process of obtaining analytical services: finding appropriate laboratories, different types of companies/organizations/individuals offering these services, and understanding the issues and limitations of interpreting results. Audience participation will be encouraged with a moderated discussion following brief presentations.

The panel discussion will be a follow-up discussion to selection of tips and case studies presented on the first day of the program (Thursday, May 31: 12:00pm to 2pm)

The audience is not limited to conservators in private practice, but any individual or organization that does not have these resources. Topics include:
obtaining free and affordable technical analyses from labs and regional sources, accurate and affordable color-matching without a spectrometer, DIY Oddy testing and RTI, and using local medical facilities for radiography

Moderators
avatar for Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Kerith Koss Schrager-[PA]

Objects Conservator, The Found Object Art Conservation
Kerith Koss Schrager is an Objects Conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation. She has worked with institutions such as Historic Hudson Valley, Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Freer|Sackler Galleries (Smithsonian Institution), Field Museum, and Shelburne... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Kristin deGhetaldi-[PA]

Dr. Kristin deGhetaldi-[PA]

deGhetaldi Fine Art Restoration, LLC
Kristin de Ghetaldi is a painting conservator who graduated in 2008 with a Master of Science degree from the Winterthur/University of Delaware program in Conservation. She recently obtained her PhD in Preservation Studies from the University of Delaware and completed a three-year... Read More →
avatar for Emily MacDonald Korth

Emily MacDonald Korth

President and Chief Analyst, Longevity Art Preservation, LLC and Art Preservation Index/APIx, LLC
Emily MacDonald-Korth is an art preservation specialist working in art conservation and research, fine art and collections consulting, and historic paint analysis. MacDonald-Korth has worked on conservation and technical analysis projects across the United States, in China, and in... Read More →
avatar for Nica Gutman Rieppi-[PA]

Nica Gutman Rieppi-[PA]

Conservator, Art Analysis & Research (AA&R)
Nica Gutman Rieppi is Principal Investigator for Art Analysis and Research (US). Working with conservators, appraisers, art advisors, auction houses and private collectors, she has over 20 years of experience in the field of art forensics. She obtained dual Master of Arts degrees... Read More →
avatar for Marc Sebastian Walton

Marc Sebastian Walton

Co-Director, Research Professor, Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts
Marc Walton joined the Northwestern University / Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts in 2013 as its inaugural Senior Scientist and as a Research Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. In January of 2018, he was appointed... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Montrose Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

12:00pm

Discolored - Now What - Socratic Dialog with Lunch
Limited Capacity seats available

The removal of a strongly yellowed varnish, the removal of the traces of corrosion caused by pigeon droppings on a bronze statue, bringing back original color and appearance. These are decisions which professionals make every day decisions on the conservation, preservation and restoration of objects in the broadest sense of the word, be it museum objects, parts of historic buildings, or entire buildings. Heated discussions still occur about which objects may be treated and exhibited or not, this since the “cleaning controversy” related to the “scientifically responsible” removal of yellowed varnishes at the National Gallery in London after the second world war. How may an object be treated and what is an acceptable results? Has the object become what it is supposed to be? Color and discoloration/fading play an important role in such discussions and the resulting conservation decisions. Color is an important part of the original appearance of an object, and the question is then, which color is the “right” one after restoration? What is a good interpretation of color? Thus, what is a good restoration with regards to color? Or, should the object be left in its discolored state? Such questions are certain to continue to incite lively discussions. However, it is often useful to step back and ask what the essence of the debate is, and why such restoration decisions are so controversial. In order to do this, a Socratic dialogue is proposed for the 2018 general sessions in Houston, continuing a series of such dialogues at AIC annual meetings. Participants will look at the role of color, discoloration and fading in conservation decisions. A Socratic dialogue is a structured form of dialogue in which all participants actively contribute. The purpose of the dialogue is not to solve the question at hand, that is, find specific answers to how one should treat discoloration and fading of objects, but to investigate each other’s experience, opinions and concerns with color and discoloration of objects. The Socratic method provides a safe, open environment for participants to investigate what the essence behind these issues is, and to understand their own points of view as well as those of others. It provides a solid foundation for thinking about and understanding how we deal with discoloration, and how this understanding might help us in making treatment decisions in the future. Cost $35 ($45 non-members)

Speakers
avatar for Dr. W. (Bill) Wei

Dr. W. (Bill) Wei

Senior Conservation Scientist, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
Dr. Wei (1955) is a senior conservation scientist in the Research Department of the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE - Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed). He has a B.S.E. in mechanical engineering from Princeton University (1977) and a Ph.D. in materials science... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Memorial Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

12:00pm

JAIC Editorial Board Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Julio M. Del Hoyo-Meléndez-[PA]

Julio M. Del Hoyo-Meléndez-[PA]

Research Scientist, National Museum in Krakow
Julio M. del Hoyo-Meléndez holds a PhD in science and conservation of cultural heritage from the Department of Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage of the Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain. He received a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in chemistry... Read More →
avatar for Bonnie Naugle

Bonnie Naugle

Communications & Membership Director, American Institute of Conservation
Bonnie Naugle joined AIC in 2012. As Communications & Membership Director, she manages AIC’s print and online publications, including AIC News, the Journal of the American Institute of Conservation, and annual meeting print materials; and oversees the membership team. She also... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Westchase Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

1:00pm

Collection Care Network Idea Fair
Interested in preventive conservation and collection care, but not sure how to get more involved around these issues at AIC? Do you have questions about the Collection Care Network? Join the Collection Care Network for an Idea Fair on June 1 at 1pm. Meet all the officers and get a chance to discuss issues in preventive conservation and collection care one-on-one in this informal meet-and-greet event. Discuss current CCN projects and interest areas, including materials testing, collaboration with allied professionals, hazards in collections, professional standing, and much more. Bring ideas and learn how to get more involved. Coffee and Cookies provide courtesy of Tru Vue sponsorship.

Moderators
avatar for Becky Kaczkowski-[PA]

Becky Kaczkowski-[PA]

Preventive Conservator, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
Rebecca A. Kaczkowski is the Preventive Conservator at the Smithsonian’s Museum Conservation Institute (MCI), where she undertakes a variety of projects related to exhibit design, museum environments, the care and storage of collections, and collection care training initiatives... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Tru Vue

Tru Vue

Museum and Conservation Liaison, Tru Vue, Inc.
With over 45 years of proven protection and preservation, Tru Vue fine art acrylic and glass solutions, including Optium® Acrylic Glazing and UltraVue® Laminated Glass, are trusted by conservation and fine art professionals to protect and display the most celebrated artworks in... Read More →


Friday June 1, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Texas Foyer

1:00pm

Archaeological Discussion Group (ADG) Business Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Frances Lukezic

Frances Lukezic

Conservator, Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory
Frances Lukezic is an objects conservator at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory and is currently a Co-Chair of AIC’s Archaeological Discussion Group. She has an MSc in Conservation from Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. Previously, she has worked at the... Read More →

Friday June 1, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Tanglewood Meeting Room Marriott Marquis Houston

2:00pm

(Imaging Technology) High-Resolution Imaging as a new Research Tool in the Rijksmuseum
With the conservation treatment of the two pendant portraits by the Dutch 17th-century Master, Rembrandt van Rijn (Portrait of Marten Soolmans and Portrait of Oopjen Coppit, 1634, canvas, 207.5 x 132 cm, SK-A-5033, SK-C-1768), newly acquired by the Dutch and French Governments, the Rijksmuseum saw an opportunity to push their photographic imaging capabilities even further. Although the Rijksmuseum has a well-established imaging protocol, including consistent lighting and end-to-end color management, it was decided, given the importance of the paintings and their conservation treatment, to utilize high resolution (1200 ppi) and multiple imaging modalities. Additionally, in order to better understand the physical condition of the pictures, they were imaged at each stage of conservation using the same imaging techniques, facilitating high-precision stitching and registration of images of both paintings and across wavelengths. The stitched and registered images, each exceeding 6 gigapixels, were then visualized using the “curtain viewer”, an internet-based image viewing technology developed by Erdmann for the Bosch research and conservation project. For this high resolution photography the museum faced several challenges. For the overall images of these large paintings, a total of 242 images were required. This amounts to approximately 70 Gb per painting per imaging modality. The maximum storage capacity of the Rijksmuseum’s Digital Asset Management (DAM) software is currently only 2 Gb per file. It was also an enormous undertaking to stitch such a large number of composite images and register them for use in the curtain viewers, enabling the conservators to fluidly switch from an overall image to the micro level and back using only the mouse wheel. In this way different technical and chemical images of the paintings, including X-radiographs, ultraviolet fluorescence images, infrared photographs and reflectograms and elemental maps acquired with macro-XRF scanning could be selected and compared ‘side by sid