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avatar for Kiraz Akoglu

Kiraz Akoglu

Yale IPCH & Computer Sciences Department
Associate Reserach Scientist
West Haven, Connecticut
Kiraz Goze Akoglu is currently Associate Research Scientist at the Yale Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage (IPCH) Sustainable Conservation Laboratory (SCL) as a conservation scientist dedicated to building materials conservation with a solid interdisciplinary scientific background. Having an interdisciplinary background has encouraged her not only to conduct scientific research, but also to implement it in different areas of Cultural Heritage Preservation. As a Masters in Archaeometry at Middle East Technical University (METU), she used optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date mud brick samples from the Catalhoyuk Neolithic Site. Her doctoral work for the Commagene Nemrut Development and Conservation Program, using surfactants to inhibit the hydric swelling of sandstones and consolidating the weak stones with nanodispersive silicate solutions, led to the approved main treatments for the sandstones of the Nemrut Mount Monument (one of World Heritage List sites in Turkey). During her appointment at METU she was involved in many national and international research projects focused on different problems of built heritage. In 2012, Akoglu has appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Architecture at Mustafa Kemal University (MKU). There she led courses on Building Materials, Physical Environment Inspection and Sustainable Architecture. At Yale IPCH she collaborated with the Computer Science department to develop CHER-Ob, an open-source software for integrating images with point-based analyses, 2- and 3-D data, and archival data in a shareable platform. It was successfully employed to use ultrasonic velocity measurements and mapping of visual weathering forms to monitor memorial stones in Grove Street Cemetery, a national landmark in Connecticut, USA. Her current research at IPCH combines finite element method computational techniques and Geological crack propagation models to study the degradation of gesso layers in medieval panel paintings, with the aim to develop standards for museum climates as part of preventive conservation methods.
Wednesday, May 30
 

12:30pm

 
Thursday, May 31
 

2:00pm

2:30pm

3:00pm

4:00pm

4:30pm

5:45pm

 
Friday, June 1
 

8:30am

10:30am

11:30am

1:00pm

3:30pm

4:00pm

4:30pm

5:00pm

 
Saturday, June 2
 

10:30am

11:30am